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Full text of "The Catholics of Scotland from 1593 : and the extinction of the hierarchy in 1603, till the death of Bishop Carruthers in 1852"

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668 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



CAP. LIV. 

PRINTING THE NEW TESTAMENT NO CHANGE OF MEAN 
ING 3OOO COPIES OF THE OLD -TESTAMENT 

BISHOP DOUGLAS AND OTHER ENGLISH CATHOLiCS 

SUBSCRIBE THE COUNT D ARTOIS AT EDINBURGH 

MISSION PUNDS HELD IN TRUST BY BISHOP 

CHISHOLM, SOME PRIESTS AND TWO LAYMEN 

BONAPARTE AT THE GATES OF ROME AN ARMISTICE 

PEACE ON HARD CONDITIONS PRINCE AUGUSTUS 

HIS LOVE FOR THE SCOTCH MISSION PROVIDING 

FOR THE SAFETY OF THE POPE DURING THE PANIC 

IN 1797, BISHOP GEDDES WORSE BISHOP HAY\S 

CONCERN AQUORTIES LEASED FOR A COLLEGE A 

HOUSE FOR 30 STUDENTS BUILT SUPERSEDED BY 

BLAIRS ITS CONDITION IN 1835 NOW ALMOST 

A SOLITUDE ABERDEEN-SHIRE FRIENDLY IN 

fey 179 7r THE FRENCH ONCE MORE APPROACHING i^ 
||||||^ ROME-^FLIGHT ; .. THE^ ONLY \ HOPE THE ? .POPE sJ|| 

"^f- HORSES " IN HIS COACH WHEN A" BRITISH OFFICER^ 

^cS 



THE MISSION FUNDS THE CONGREGATIONS URGED 

TO ASSIST THEIR PASTORS COADJUTOR APPLIED 

FOR SEMINARY FOR THE HIGHLANDS PAINFUL 
CONDITION OF BISHOP GEDDES SECOND SIGHT. 






CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



669 



By October, 1790, Bishop Geddes and Mr. Robert 
son had fairly begun to print the New Testament 
The Greek and Vulgate versions, three English 
Catholic translations, King James and the Italian 
version of Martini, which had been commended by 
the Pope, were all before them. They were so 
sparing in making alterations, that in the whole Gospel 
of St. Matthew, which they had gone through, they 
had not changed the meaning of one word. Some 
expressions, indeed, they had changed. Bishop 
Challoner had done the same in every one of his 
three editions. It does not appear that the work of 
reprinting was continued ; nor are we informed as to 
the amount of work that was done. Nothing 
practical was accomplished, apparently, till the year 
1796, when Bishop Hay, in concurrence with others, 
bargained with John Moir, a printer at Edinburgh, 
for an edition of 3,000 copies of the Old Testament ,jj 
in four volumes. The total. expense, including paper 
and binding, was ^740. Bishop Gibson subscribed 
-,-. for upwards of 1,000 copies in sheets, Bishop Douglas ; 
for 600, Mr. Thomas Eyre atCrookhall, for 100, and, 1 
Coghlan, the bookseller, for 100. Moir printed a like 
edition of the New Testament at ^197. The two 
English Bishops took 1,350 copies, Mr. Eyre, 100, 
and Coghlan, 100. The selling price of the Old 
Testament bound, was 1 2s. ; that of the New, to non 









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CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



subscribers, three shillings. The work was under 
taken and paid for by subscription. Half of the 
price was to be paid on delivery of the second volume. 
By this means alone money was obtained for print 
ing the remaining volumes. Payments to workmen 
and for paper required to be made regularly. Neither 
the Bishop nor Mr. Moir had capital to advance for 
that purpose. The former, nevertheless, was under 
the necessity of advancing upwards of ^80 in order 
to complete the work. The Bishop remained in 
Edinburgh the greater part of the summer, superin 
tending the press. 

Early this year, the exiled Count D Artois came 
to Edinburgh. He was most hospitably received ; 
and apartments were fitted up for him in the Palace 
of Holyrood. It was his intention to remain there r 
until it should be possible for him to. return to France, 
as heir to~the Crown. Bishop Hay was introduced 
to him by his chaplain and was graciously received. 

The Bank of Scotland making a call on its share 
holders, at this time it became necessary that 
Bishop Hay should pay to the bank as much as 
,1800. This would oblige him, he said, to live, at 
least six years, with the greatest economy. Bishop 
Geddes had great doubts as to the expediency of 
lodging so much money in the bank in one name. It 
was a subject he thought, for deliberation and advice, 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



671 






on account of the umbrage it might give to some ill- 
inclined persons, that Bishop Hay should have so 
large a sum of money in the bank, both on account 
of the inconvenience of transferring so much property 
in case of the Bishop s death, and of the temptation 
it presented to his relations in the event of any in 
formality or error in his possession. Inquiry, even, 
in such a matter would be disagreeable. 

As soon, accordingly, as Bishop Hay could proceed 
to the North after attending to the printing of the 
Scriptures, the two Bishops executed a trust deed of 
all their properties in favour of Bishop Chisholm, of 
some of the clergy and two lay gentlemen whom 
they enpowered in the event of their decease without 
successors to hold in trust all the monies standing 
in their names, for the interests of the mission. 

At this time, Rome was panic-struck by the 
approach of a French army under Bonaparte. It 
had taken Bologna, and was marching in three 
columns by different routes, against the City of the 
Popes. The Roman army was quite unable to make 
head against this formidable force, being only 3,000 
in number, and consisting chiefly of the most undis 
ciplined soldiers that could be imagined. Two-^, 
thirds of them were French emigrants, Italian deser 
ters and the refuse of other nations. Diplomacy 
was at work ; but, meanwhile, the fear of the French 



6 7 2 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 






soldiery prevailed. The Scotch agent, writing to the 
Bishop, says: "Such noise and confusion there was 
in town, such dejection and despair surpasses all 
conception ; not a house but resounded with the 
cries of -women and children ; not a countenance but 
expressed terror and dismay, many entirely lost their 
judgments, and parents attempted to make away with 
their daughters by a violent death to preserve them 
from insult. If the courier who came to announce 
an armistice had delayed for twenty-four hours more, 
scenes would have happened here that would have 
equalled anything that is barbarous in history, and 
it is too probable that this day Rome would be a 
mass of ruins. Glory to God the danger is over, 
and I trust there is no fear it will recur. We have 

made an armistice ; and a plenipotentiary is des- 



patched to Paris in order to conclude a peace. The 
conditions are dreadful and humiliating to the last 
degree. We have ourselves to blame for them," $81 

- . : - . / \ -*.. & "_"*:",".? .,>> "";" *i 

Before the courier arrived the more religious 
people betook themselves to prayer. Their miserable 
army gave them no hope ; and the terror inspired by 
the enemy that was so near their gates, was greater 
than would be caused by a horde of the worst 
barbarians. Every street was crowded with peni 
tential processions at all hours of the day, and even 
the night. Prince Augustus had not left Italy. 









CATHOLICS OF "SCOTLAND. 



673 



During the panic he advised the Scotch agent to fly 
with his young charge. As for himself he declared 
that as long as there was any chance of his being of 
service to the Scotch mission, in Rome, he neither - 
-could nor would fly. Mr. McPherson, the Scotch 
agent, has made arrangements for sending his 
students to Naples or Tuscany. The Irish agent 
had disappeared. Mr. Smelt, the English agent, 
was resolved to seek safety in Naples. The Cardinals 
.also determined on taking refuge in the kingdom of 
Naples, carrying the Holy Father along with them ; 
for they were convinced that if he fell into the 
hands of the French they would certainly convey 
him to Paris, where every bad consequence, both as 
regarded his safety and the welfare of religion, was 
to be dreaded. 

In January, 1797, Bishop Geddes became suddenly 
worse. "Bishop Hay set out, at once, to close, as he 
^believed, the eyes of his friend, and coadjutor. The 
invalid, however, rallied, once more ; and the Bishop 
continued his journey to Fetternear in order to" i 
-confer with Mr. Leslie, the proprietor, on the lease 
of a farm for the seminary. An amicable arrange 
ment was speedily made. The Bishop obtained a^ 
lease of the farm of Aquorties on the banks of the 

River Don, two miles from the House of Fetternear 

> . * "> * 

and three from the town of Inverurie, for 107 years." 



674 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



, 



The farm consisted of 200 acres of arable land and 
400 of hill and moor. The rent was ^120, or 90- 
yearly, ^500 being paid on taking possession. It 
was resolved to commence immediately the building 
of a house for the seminary, and at the same time 
the requisite farm offices. It was an arduous and 
costly enterprise. Hence it was necessary to solicit 
subscriptions. The congregation of Propaganda was 
first applied to ; but, owing to the distracted state of 
Italy, could give no assistance. The Government 
was appealed to in favour of the work through Sir 
John Hippisley. The Catholics of the Lowlands 
subscribed more largely than could have been 
expected. Mr. Bagnal, the young priest of Kirkcon- 
nell, obtained from his congregation alone more than 
^80. Edinburgh subscribed ^120. Aberdeen and 
the neighbouring country the same amount. Other 
missions contributed in proportion. The house, not 
"including out buildings, cost ^".1,000; not a large 
sum, considering that it was calculated to accommo 
date thirty students, together with the requisite , 
number of masters and servants. 

It was still occupied by the mission when the 
writer visited the place, the year of his ordination, 
1835. The late Rev. James Sharp was at that time 
in charge of both the farm and the congregation. A 
later visitor found it, when in the hands of a stranger, 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



.675 






quite undivested of its college-like appearance. The 
building is of solid granite, three stories high, with 
an attic, eighty feet in length by twenty-two in width. 
It faces the South, and the River Don in all its 
beauty is seen from the front windows. Its pleasure 
garden, although not large, is finely ornamented 
with shrubberies and a small pond. It is surrounded 
by a formal belt of trees and presents a fair specimerk 
of the landscape gardening of the period. At the - 
western end of the building is the chapel, about 
twenty feet by fourteen, and rising to the height of 
the second story. An outside door admitted the 
congregation. There are galleries at the sides and 
each end of the chapel. In that which faces the altar 
there were seats for the Fetternear family and a few 
people besides. In another gallery on the epistle 
, side .of the altar, communicating with the school 
room, the students , had their seats. The altar and 
altar rails were still preserved as they had been 
originally, the worthy tenant, acting on the impression 
:that a place once dedicated to divine worship should . 
not be subjected to meaner uses. The Corinthian 
pillars above the altar still supported a canopy. The 
space on the floor of the chapel had been for the 
service of the congregation. At the back of the 
house there is a large and fruitful kitchen-garden. It 
was first set apart by the Bishop and cultivated 






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CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



according to his directions. It is still kept in the 
highest order. The Bishop had a room in the house 
to which he resorted in his declining years ; and in 
this room he departed to the better world. The 
place, hallowed by so many interesting associations, 
is now comparatively a solitude ; and in thinking of 
what it was and what it is, one is reminded of 
the lines of Rogers : 

" Mute is the bell that rung at peep of dawn, 
Quickening my truant feet across the lawn ; 
Unheard the shout that rent the noontide air, 
When the slow dial gave a pause to care. 
Up springs at every step to claim a tear, 
Some little friendship formed and cherished here ; 
And not the lightest leaf but trembling teems 
With golden visions and romantic dreams." 

Sir John Hippisley, who was now residing at 
Warfield Grove, Berks, took a warm interest in the 
new seminary. As much aid was required in 
establishing it, and the Bishops contemplated apply- 
,ing to the Government, Sir John advised that they 
i ^should address Mr. Dundas and, through him, the 
Duke of Portland. The worthy Baronet -himself 
also undertook to recommend the matter to Govern 
ment, and for this purpose desired to have a state 
ment of the least possible expense that would be re 
quired to commence the seminary. The assistance 
of the English Catholics might also be requested. 

It was now admitted that a long lease, such as the 
Bishop had obtained, was preferable to a purchase 




CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



-67; 









of property, so little could the Catholics, as yet, rely 
on the better feeling towards them that had come to 1 

o 

prevail in the country. It was, indeed, a disadvan 
tage that there were but few Catholics in the 
neighbourhood of Aquorties. But such disadvantage 
was counterbalanced by the fortunate circumstance 
that the Protestant population of Aberdeenshire 
were more friendly to Catholics than that of any 
other part of the country. The agent at Rome did 
all in his power to interest in the cause of the new 
seminary the Cardinals Gerdil, Albani and Antonelli. 
They favoured it with their approbation ; but, in the 
uncertain state of affairs in Italy, they did nothing 
more. 

In February, 1797, the French were once more at 
the gates of Rome. There was the greatest con 
sternation in the city. It behoved the Scotch agent 
to provide fpr the safety of the students. Acting- ; 
under the directions of the Cardinal Protector, he 
secured the ready money and church plate of the 
.college and made arrangements for the departure of! 
the few students there and of fifteen English students 
whom their agent had left to do as they best could.;- 
He was much assisted by Mr. Graves, an English 
merchant at Rome. Passports and everything else 
that was required, being procured, the party left 
Rome for Civita Vecchia on 1 2th February. Mr. 



CATHOLICS. OF SCOTLAND. 



Sloane, a Scotch merchant there, was all attention 
to them. The day before their departure eleven 
Cardinals fled from Rome. The Pope s horses were 
in his coach, and he was himself dressed for flight, 
when a British officer, Colonel Duncan, arrived at 
the Vatican from Florence, and gave information 
to the effect that the danger was not so im 
minent. The Holy Father shed tears when he found 
that it was not necessary to leave his capital so 
suddenly. In the course of a fortnight the British 
students came back to their colleges. The agent 
was not, as yet, however, without apprehension ; but 
he gave way to importunity. 

The annual meeting was held this year at Gibston, 
near Huntly. Bishops Hay and Chisholm met 
there in the month of August, the administrators of 
the mission funds. It was an important meeting. 
Bishop Hay thereat adopted measures that effectually 
, put a stop to the reports injurious to his character as 
an honest manager of the mission affairs, which were 
afloat ever since the last meeting of administrators 
which was held three years previously. Regarding 
the partial appropriation of a legacy to a special pur 
pose, his opponents had accused him of acting with 
out the advice or concurrence of the administrators, 
and of endeavouring to force them, in an overbearing 
manner, to do as seemed to him fit in the matter. 



CATHOLICS O* SCOTLAND. 



6/9 



The second question concerned an extraordinary 
supply voted for division among the clergy. The 
Bishop had been accused of arbitrarily excluding some 
-of them from the benefit of this supply, contrary to 
the known intentions of the administrators. In 
order to meet these accusations, the Bishop laid 
before the meeting a detailed statement of all 
that occurred at the former meeting and ex 
tracted therefrom a number of queries to which 
he requested categorical replies. This request was 
complied with ; and the replies, completely clearing 
the Bishop of all that had been alleged against him,, 
were written down by Mr. John Reid, clerk to the 
meeting, and signed by all the administrators present. 
Thus were the ill-judged and unfounded misrepresen 
tations of Mr. Farquarson and a few others who 
thought themselves aggrieved by the Bishop, com 
pletely, publicly, and finally refuted. At the same 
meeting Bishop Hay resigned the office of procurator, 
Mr. Charles Maxwell succeeding. Mr. Maxwell, in 
consequence, removed from his mission at H untly to 
Edinburgh. The income of the mission was much 
reduced by the complete failure of its funds in France 
and a great falling off in the remittances that usually 
came from Rome. Four hundred and nineteen 
pounds yearly, was all that could be relied on while 
the expenditure for quotas, that is the allowances to 



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the priests alone, amounted to more than ^550. The 
guardians of the fund, therefore, were under the 
painful necessity of issuing a circular letter informing 
their brethren why they were compelled to reduce 
the quotas to ^15 for the large towns and 10 for 
country missions. 

Hitherto the Catholic laity had not considered it a 
duty to contribute towards the support of their pastors. 
They were now addressed on the subject in a docu- . 
ment signed by the Bishops and appended to the 
letter which conveyed to the clergy the unwelcome 
tidings that their miserable salaries must be reduced. 
The people were shown that there is high authority 
for requiring that they should contribute towards the 
maintenance of their clergy. They were told, more 
over, that unless they made an effort in this direction,, 
all pastoral ministrations must necessarily cease. 

The usual letters to Rome were signed later by 
Bishop Geddes at Aberdeen. In these letters the 
Bishops renewed their^request for a coadjutor in the 
Lowland District (a request which, as has already 
been shown, was complied with), and informed the 
Cardinals that it was the intention of the Bishop of 
the Highland District to establish ere long, at home, 
a seminary, similar to that which had been already 
so auspiciously begun by his brother Bishop ot the 
Lowlands. It was also intimated that Bishop 



;$* 









CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



68 1 











Geddes had nearly lost his speech, that his appetite 
was gone, and that, from time to time, he was attacked 
with such violent internal pain as to make it difficult 
to believe that he could live an hour. His patience, 
meanwhile, was most exemplary. 

The meeting once over, a new matter, on which 
the reader will be glad to have the opinion of the 
Bishops, came up for consideration. It was quite 
natural that Bishop Chisholm should be applied to 
for information on the subject of second sight, which 
was more prevalent in the Highlands than in any 
other part of Scotland. The agent at Rome, Mr.. 
McPherson, requested of him answers to certain 
queries, and with such answers the Bishop readily 
supplied him. In a letter of iQth August, 1797 
Bishop Chisholm wrote : 

"rst. It is my own private opinion that such a 
thingjias existed and does now exist, though less^ 

frequently than in former times. Many are fully 

, . 
convinced of the real existence of the second sight; 

but, many likewise, look upon it as a chimera. But 

-; ^ii* 

you will observe that many are incredulous in matters 
of greater consequence, and many know nothing. 
about the matter, and many are ashamed to acknow- 
ledge their belief on this head, as the belief of the 
second sight is not fashionable. 









682 



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"2nd, There are treatises written on the second 
sight. . 

"3. Some families are more famous for the second 
sight than others ; such is the family of McDonald 
of Morar, though it cannot be said to be confined to 
any particular family exclusively. 

"4th. The nature of it is generally a short and 
sometimes imperfect representation of what is to 
happen, does happen, or has happened at a distance 
beyond the reach of natural knowledge. 

"5th. Such as are affected with the second sight, 
see indiscriminately, happy and unhappy events, but 
more frequently, events of black and melancholy com 
plexion. They see them before the event takes place, 
while it takes place, and after it has happened, but at 
such a distance that it would be impossible to know 
it so soon in a natural way. 

Forbes of Culloden, President of the Court of. 
Session^- while employed in checking some of the 
Highland Chiefs from joining the Prince, was cast 
by contrary winds into one of the small western isles. 
He went, as he landed, to a gentleman s house, who 
had a snug elegant dinner prepared for him and his 
company on their arrival. " Sir," said the President, 
astonished at the sight of the entertainment, and 
understanding the gentleman, s fortune could not be 
great, "May I beg leave to ask if you always live in 










CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



68 3 






this style." "No, my Lord," says the landlord, 
that I cannot afford." "And how," replies the 
President, " did you happen to have such a dinner 
to-day?" "I knew," said the Islander, that your 
Lordship was to be here to-day," " Impossible," 
answers the President, "we only landed just now, 
and, a little before, we knew nothing about it our 
selves. * "Why, my Lord, a man who lives by me 
announced your arrival by describing your Lordship s 
person, your company, dress, figure, etc., and inform 
ing me of the time you would be here to-day, which 
made me prepare the dinner you see." 

A connection of mine, Major Chisholm, son to 
Chisholm of Chisholm, was one day, as he told me, 
walking with his father before the door of the latter s 
castle, when from the castle, a woman, famous for the 
second sight, rushed out and cried aloud : " God. 
preserve your , son, Laird, God preserve your son 
Roderick, I see him all covered over with blood." In 
a short time who appeared on an eminence corning - 
home but Roderick supported by two men, and all / 
covered with blood, after a dangerous fall which was 
only a prelude to the blood he spilt soon after, under 
the Prince, .while he commanded his father s men at 
Culloden. After receiving a mortal wound, my 
uncle who was next in command to him, wanted to 
remove him from the field, and made a motion to 






684 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 






follow him. " No," said he, " command the mere, 
lest any of them should leave the ranks." 

Bishop Hugh McDonald s servant fainted, one day, 
at table. When he recovered he was asked the 
cause : " Why," said he," I saw a dead child on the 
table before me." Within a little space the dead 
body of the child was stretched on. that very table.. 
The Bishop told the story. 

Bishop John McDonald s nephew, who was bred 
in England, came to see his friends in the Highlands. 
While in Morar, among some of his relations, he was,, 
all at once, struck. When asked about it, " I see," 
answered he, "a person drowned, taken out of the 
water ;" and he described his appearance. In a short 
time after, the accounts of such a man as he described- 
being drowned and taken out of the water, were 
received. I knew the man. 

A short time before you (Mr. Paul McPherson}. 
went to Rome, (i 793), in my vicinity while in Strath- 
glass, a child saw his father, Bailie Hector McKenzie r : J 
steward to McKenzie of Seaforth, in the winding 

i- 

sheets. His father called him his little prophet, and 

| soon after, died. 

You have now the second sight brought down to 

. your time from Culloden. I could, for the informa 
tion of their Lordships, give you my opinion relative 
to the cause of it ; I do not mean a natural cause ;. 












- CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



68 5 



l>iit, as this has not been asked, I refer it to another 
time. Some, in very pompous expressions, have at- 

. i 

tempted to explain the second sight in a natural way; 
but their accounts appeared to me most unsatisfactory 
and absurd. I ever am, my dear sir, unalterably 

jyours, 

JOHN CHISHOLM." 






686 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



CAP. LV. 

SECOND SIGHT CONTINUED ALEX. CAMERON, BISHOP 

REGARDING A BRITISH RESIDENT AT ROME 

MISSION OF BALLOCH THE BISHOP REJECTS UN 
NECESSARY CHANGES -- "WOULD HAVE CHURCH 

MUSIC BUT FOR THE TEMPER OF THE TIMES 

THE MUNSHES PRIEST S DOCTORS OF DIVINITY 

BRIGANDAGE OF FRENCH SOLDIERS PIUS VI. 

HURRIED AWAY FROM ROME CONVEYED TO VAL 
ENCE DIED THERE 2QTH AUGUST, 1/99, AGED 

8 1 SCOTCH COLLEGE SEIZED BY FRENCH REPUBLIC 

REV. P. MACP1IERSON BRINGS STUDENTS SAFELY 

HOME MR. MACPHERSON HIGHLY HONOURED IN 

LONDON ASTONISHMENT IN POLITICAL CIRCLES 

BISHOP HAY JUBILANT. 

The question of second sight appears to have 
.been a good deal studied at Rome. One of the 
Cardinals wrote a treatise on it ; and while engaged- 
in collecting facts and materials for this work, Bishop 
Hay took great pains in supplying him with cases 
that had occurred, chiefly in the Highlands; and 
such only as were well authenticated. The Cardinal s 
object was to show that the faculty of second sigJtt 
originated with the evil spirit. The Bishop held 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



687 



the same opinion as the Cardinal as to the origin of 
the faculty. Regarding the fact of its existence, 
there could be no question. There were two in 
stances, particularly, which he was wont to relate, 
giving the proofs, the names of the parties, places, 
witnesses, etc. The first of these was that of a man, 
possessing the faculty of second sight, who declared 
that he saw a child, at the time in apparent health, 
running about the house, dressed in its grave clothes. 
In the other case was described circumstantially, the 
accidental death of a man, at the time of the vision 
in perfect health. 

The Rev. Donald Carmichael combated the Bis 
hop s opinion which ascribed the faculty to the agency 
of the evil one. How could the devil know such and 
such future contingencies ? The Bishop s reply was 
that although the devil has no absolute knowledge of 
.the future, he might have seen in the case of the child 
some indications of internal and mortal disease, not 
yet apparent to human perception. In the case of the 
man, the devil might have prepared the accident and 
made a pretty sure guess as to the event, even though^ 
it was no more than a guess or a conjecture. "I 
would be. interesting to knowwhat the Bishop thought 

of the Lord President s case, related above in Bishop % \ 

- 

Chisholm s letter. Nothing short of absolute Jcnmdedye 
of the future which he denies, and which we must all , 



.688 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



deny to the evil one, could have enabled him through 
ja. seer, to give notice of the President s arrival at the 
.house of the gentleman where he dined so well. If 
-the arrival was brought about by the power of the 
.devil, he must, once at least, have mistaken his 
-vocation when he refrained from wrecking the 
boat and drowning the learned judge and excellent 
-man, together with his whole company. This would 
have been more in keeping with the character which 
Scripture gives to the fiend, who "goes about like a 
raging lion seeking whom he may devour." (Sicut leo 
yngiens, qvcerens quern devoret.} 

It was arranged that the newly appointed coadjutor 
-should be consecrated in Spain. The first news 
which he had of his appointment was in a letter from 
Mr. McPherson that reached him at the same time as 
.an official intimation from Bishop Hay, written at 
Huntly. The Bishop was kind and complimentary. 
The agent s letter was also very gratifying, and:, the 
more so as Mr. Cameron cherished a warm friend 
ship for the Scotch agent at Rome and all his former 
associates. Mr. Cameron s promotion caused a 
vacancy in the Rectorship of the College of Valla- 
dolid. The Scotch Bishops, desiring to avail them 
selves of the privileges granted by a former King 
of Spain, Charles III., prayed that his successor, 
Charles IV., continuing the same privileges, would 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



689 






name to the office one of three whom they proposed. 
They, at the same time, commended the College to 
His Majesty s favour. 

About this time Sir John Hippisley informed 
Bishop Hay, that but for the irruption of the French 
into the Papal States, a British resident at Rome 
would have been appointed by the British Govern 
ment. In the actual circumstances, however, there 
was to be only a Resident on the part of the British 
Merchants, in the person of Mr. Graves. No assist 
ance had, as yet, been obtained from Government 
for the Scotch Mission. The worthy Baronet was 
still watching for an opportunity to forward the matter. 
There was some rather warm discussion between 
Bishops Hay and Chisholm in regard to the Balloch 
or Drummond Mission, where Mr. Andrew Carruthers % . 
was placed. It does not appear to have led to any 

; Important result ; and hence no details need be given. 
Mr. Robertson, the Benedictine friar from Ratis- 

*bon, desired the sanction of the Bishop to some * 
unnecessary and inappropriate changes which he had ** 
introduced into the services for his small congrega 
tion at Munshes. He wished that English prayers, 

/and long ones too, should be enjoined on all congre 
gations before Mass ; that the sermon should be 
delivered in the middle of Mass instead of being 
always preached before Mass began, as had been 



690 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 






the custom in the Scotch mission from time immem 
orial, and that there should be music in his chapeL 
The Bishop patiently reasoned with him on all these 
points ; and firmly refused to sanction such unneces 
sary "changes. It would be appropriate and edifying" 
to have suitable church music, the Bishop always 
thought, but the temper of the times must be con 
sidered. Mr. Robertson s way of managing his con 
gregation was very peculiar. A set of people called 
Elders formed his council, respecting the poor ; there 
were lecturers and Psalm readers in the chapel on Sun 
days, and the council met at the village of Dalbeattie 
once a week, to discuss points of faith and contro 
versy. At these councils he sometimes presided 
himself; if not perhaps Thomas Copeland, John 
Rigg, (two tenants,) or some such Doctor of Divinity 
- took the chair. . Such like practices led to the opinion 
.which -came to prevail in the country, that Mr. 

* _ . /-V. ;*" : *v * 

, Robertson s prayers were not like those at Terreagles 
and Kirkconnell. Mr. John Pepper, the Chaplain: 
at Terreagles, who first gave this information in -a 
letter to Mr. C. Maxwell, expressed the opinion that 
a hard task was in preparation for Mr. Robertson s 
successor. 

As the occupation of Rome by the French affected 
the interests of the Scotch Mission, allusion to it here 
is not out of place. What the Romans dreaded for 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



691 



some time, fell upon the city with all its terrors. A 
French General, Duphot, happening to be killed in 
a riot which he himself excited, no better pretext was 
required by the Revolutionary Army. It was com 
manded by General Berthier, and unceremoniously 
entered and took possession of the city. It acted, 
however, with what, for such an army may be called 
moderation. There was neither pillage nor massacre ; 
and, as long as Berthier commanded, discipline was 
tolerably well maintained. The mean and cruel 
Massena soon succeeded, when there occurred serious 
disorders. The houses of noblemen and other wealthy 
citizens were entered and objects of value carried off. 
Such brigandage touched the honour of the army; and 
the indignant officers presented to the General a strong 
and determined remonstrance, to which were affixed 
several pages of signatures. Massena, in order to- 
counteract this formidable opposition to thievishriess, *. 
ordered a considerable portion of the army to quarters, 
at some distance from Rome. The officers refused 
to obey ; on which, Massena resigned the command, 
and left the city. A greater robbery, meanwhile was" 
remorselessly . committed. The Holy Father was. 
deprived of his temporal sovereignty, and deported,, 
successively/to Sienna, the Chartreuse (Carthusian 
Convent) of Florence, Parma, Turin, Besancon in 
France, Grenoble, and, finally, Valence, where Pius 







692 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 






VI., exhausted by fatigue and anxiety, ended his days 
on the 29th of August, 1799, aged 81. The people, 
wherever he passed, were loud in their demonstrations 
of affection and veneration. 

Three days after the removal of the Pope, the 
Scotch College was taken possession of in the name 
of the French Republic ; but not without much show 
of civility. Mr. McPherson, the agent, remained a 
month longer, hoping to do something still for the 
service of the mission. His chief care, however, was 
the safety of the students. It is very noticeable that 
the French authorities gave him money for his and 
their journey, together with a passport through France 
and a letter to the Minister of the Interior, in case they 
should get into trouble. Mr. McPherson s charge 
was a heavy one ; but he. acquitted himself of it with 
complete success. By 7th April, he had reached 
Genoa f and there, as well as at Civita Vecchia, he 
; met with the greatest civility on the part of the 
French authorities. A few weeks later, he completed, 
without accident, the journey which he had so coura- 1 
geously undertaken, travelling from Marseilles through 
.the heart of France, with his youthful charge to 
London. 

In London Mr. McPherson was much honoured. 
He was an object of interest to His Majesty!s Minis 
ters, to all of whom he was introduced by Sir John 






CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



693 



Hippisley. He had interviews with the Speaker of 
the House of Commons, and presentations to the 
Prince of Wales and the Duke of York. The whole 
political world was stirred by the presence of a man 
who had so fearlessly undertaken and successfully 
performed a journey which to all appeared exceed 
ingly dangerous. Men s admiration was all the 
greater as they still retained but too lively a recollec 
tion of the worst atrocities of the French Revolution. 
Mr. McPherson, himself, was very cool over the 
matter, and only hoped that the acquaintance of so 
many great people would prove useful to him on some 
future occasion. Bishop Hay s anxiety was relieved, 
it was " a cordial to his heart," he said, to receive the 
agent s first letter from London, intimating his safe 
arrival. He immediately communicated the good 
news to Aberdeen and other places. 



> 



694 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



CAP. LVI. 

VALUABLE MANUSCRIPTS MR. MACPHERSON s RETURN 

TO SCOTLAND KIND LETTER OF CARDINAL GERDIL 

PASTORAL LETTER ON LOYALTY BISHOP GEDDES 

LAST LETTER REVOLUTIONARY PRINCIPLES 

SECRETLY SPREADING IN SCOTLAND PROPERTY 

OF THE SCOTCH COLLEGE, ROME ST. PETER S 

AND THE JEWS SIR JOHN HIPPISLEY IN BEHALF 
OF MISSION FUNDS PUBLIC MEN FAVOURABLE- 
GOVERNMENT GRANT LETTER OF MR. DUNDAS 

THE FRENCH TEMPORARILY DRIVEN OUT OF 

ROME, BUT TOO SOON AS YET TO RESTORE ANY 
THING HOME SEMINARIES LAST ILLNESS AND 

DEATH OF BISHOP GEDDES HIS WRITINGS PRO- 

JPAGANDA ROBBED AIDED BY A LIBERAL SPANIARD 

AUSTRIAN S AND RUSSIANS BEAT THE FRENCH 

SAWARROW UNDERSTOOD TO HAVE COMMISSION 

, TO DELIVER THE POPE PIUS VI. CONVEYED TO 

VALENCE DIES THERE. 

Mr. McPherson brought from Paris, four valuable 
manuscripts, the property of the Scotch College there. 
He lent them to Mr. George Chalmers, the eminent 
antiquary, who, in return, gave the agent a carefully 
written receipt. It contains the titles of the manu- 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



695 



scripts which had belonged to the Archbishop of 
Glasgow. They are also enumerated as follows : 
ist, Of the Chartulary of that See (Glasgow) marked 
A ; 2nd, The Chartulary of the same, marked B ; 
3rd, An Original Register in paper of the Lands and 
other Temporal Rights of that See ; 4th, Another 
Register in paper, marked on the outside, 1499, 1510, 
also concerning the Temporal Rights of the same 
See. Then follows a promise to return the manu 
scripts on demand, and a most polite acknowledg 
ment of Mr. McPherson s kindness. It happened 
unfortunately when Mr. Chalmers died, that the 
Chartulary marked A, and the Register of the Lands 
of the See of Glasgow, notwithstanding the receipt, 
were considered as his private property. The other 
two manuscripts are now at Preshome together with 
other historical treasures. ->- 

Mr.~McPherson now returned to Scotland, where, 

f , V 

as may be well conceived, he met with a cordial wel-. 
come. Bishop Hay had need of. this consolation, for 
he was overwhelmed with grief when he heard that 
Rome was in the hands of the French Revolutionist 
and the Holy Father their prisoner. 

The agent was the bearer of a most kind and con 
soling letter from Cardinal Gerdil to the Scotch 
Bishops. 






\ 



696 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



Bishop Hay, after visiting the building operations 
in progress at Aquorties, set about preparing a pastoral 
letter on the Duty of Loyalty to the Government 
As usual, he took counsel on the subject with his in 
valid coadjutor, requesting him to give a sketch of 
the general plan of the letter. Bishop Geddes replied 
by an amanuensis, at great length, notwithstand 
ing the severity of his ailments. It was the last letter 
that he ever composed. From this date, the afflicted 
Bishop no longer took any part in public affairs, bu^ 
turning his face away from the world, thought only 
of preparing for the final change, which, he believed,, 
was near at hand. 

The pastoral letter on Loyalty was speedly issued 
from the Edinburgh Press ; and was well calculated 
to meet a want of the time ; for there is no denying; 
that the dangerous principles of the French Revolu 
tion were secretly spreading even among the cool and 
wary population of Scotland. 

All the moveable property of the Scotch College 
at Rome was sold, and the College itself, together 
with the Church was let. Mr. Sloane bought from 
the Jews the pictures that were in the Church and 
the pietra sacra (altar stone) of the high altar. These 
objects it was his intention to restore in more happy 
days. Meanwhile he was proud to have them, as he 
stated in a letter to Mr. McPherson, particularly his 









CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



697 



" friend St. Andrew," which art judges pronounced 
a good picture, and also " St. Margaret." a work 
which he intended to have repaired. It was not to . 
be supposed that at such a time even the great 
Church of Rome and the Catholic world should 
escape being desecrated. St. Peter s was to be 
closed and delivered during four months to the Jews 
to be ungilded ; and then it was to be given to the 
Capuchins. The Church, however, was partially 
saved by the parsimony of the Jews. They would 
not pay the price demanded for the gilding, and so- 
the vandalic operation of removing it was not per 
formed. 

The robberies in Italy and France had so much re- / 
duced the funds of the Scotch mission that there was 
only a very inadequate allowance to the priests for 
maintenance. This was a great hardship, especially . 
in the poorer, missions. The very friendly and in 
defatigable Sir John Hippisley was much moved byj 
the statements made to him by the Bishops, and re-; 
solved to use his great influence .with His Majesty s, 
Ministers in order to obtain a grant from the Govern 
ment in aid of the clergy. All his diplomacy was. v 
put in requisition, and it needed it all. The Ministers 
were friendly and inclined to bestow the desired grant; 
but they dreaded lest by so doing they should raise a 
storm of fanatical intolerance, for they 1 well knew that 






698 



CATHOEICS OF SCOTLAND. 



this kind of demon was not dead, but only slept. 
Mr. Dundas, indeed, distinctly expressed his fear in 
a conversation with Sir J. Hippisley ; whilst, at the 
same time, he admitted that a good case had been 
made out for relieving the Scotch clergy. Sir John 
was not to be defeated. He drew up an amended 
statement, in which it was suggested that some 
private persons in Scotland might be named to whom 
Government might hand over a sum of money for the 
relief of the Catholic clergy ; and that the persons so 
entrusted should pay this money to the Bishops for 
the benefit of their clergy. The proposal was pleas 
ing to Mr. Dundas ; and the papers relating to it 
were left with him. There was still much negotia 
tion. The Lord Advocate wrote to Bishop Hay, in 
his own hand, although it was his custom to dictate 
to a clerk, stating that he was directed to ask the 
, Bishop s opinion of the following scheme of relief, 
- and to ^ invite any amendments, or alterations that 
.might occur to him. Government proposed to give 
each of the two Bishops ;ioo a year ; each of the 
two coadjutors ^60 ; and to each of the fifty clergy 
20 a year. Bishop Hay was asked whether he would 
wish a distinction to be made between the Bishops 
and their coadjutors, whether the Bishop first in rank 
should have more than his colleague, say 120, and 
the second ^90 or ^100; and the coadjutors in a 




CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



699 



similar proportion; and whether the ,1000 which 
the Government designed for the clergy of the second 
order should be divided equally among them all. As 
to the "schools" the Bishop s letter of February 26th, 
on which this scheme was based, did not state, ex- 
plicity, what amount of aid was necessary to preserve 
them in the same state, as before their continual 
losses. Their funds were stated to be thirty shares 
of bank stock and ^800 capital, equally divided 
between the two " schools." The Bishop was 
now asked to say whether more than this was 
required for their efficiency, and how much 
more. As to the two Colleges which were then in 
progress of erection, the same inquiry applied. 
" Your own good sense and discretion," the Lord 
Advocate concluded, " will, I am sure, dictate to you - 
the^ delicacy of this last topic and the unavoidable 
necessity of these two establishments being kept on 
as private and limited a footing as is consistent with 
the object of the undertaking." When the Bishop s - 
answer should arrive, the Advocate trusted to" be 
able, ere long, to inform -him " that a class of persons 
whose virtue and loyalty 1 so much respect, as I do 
that of the Catholic clergy and laity of Scotland, are 
relieved by the liberality of the British Government 
from the distresses under which they have been so 
unfortunately subjected." The business was finally 



7oo 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



settled at an interview held by both the Scotch 
Bishops with the Lord Advocate at Edinburgh 
(June 17). Each of the Bishops was to receive 
^100 a year, and his coadjutor ^50. It was also- 
settled that the Government allowance to the clergy 
should be at such a rate, as, when combined with 
the income of their common fund, should give each 
priest 20 a year. The new Colleges were to- 
receive, each of them ^50 a year, and each of them 
also, a grant of ^600 towards their erection. 

The Bishops could not but be grateful to the 
Ministers of the day, and particularly to Sir John 
Hippisley, who, after three years of persevering and 
tedious negotiation, had reached so happy a conclu 
sion. They expressed their gratitude, accordingly, 
in an appropriate letter to Sir John, dated at Edin 
burgh, June ipth, 1799. Bishop Hay, at the sug 
gestion of- Sir John Hippisley, also wrote a letter of . 
thanks, in his own and his colleague s name, to Mr.- 
Secretary Dundas. It was favoured with a prompt 
; and highly complimentary reply : 

29th July, 1799. 

"REVEREND SIRS It is with much pleasure, that 
I acknowledge the receipt of your letter, particularly 
as I find by it that the aid which his Majesty s Gov 
ernment has been enabled to extend to you and the 
rest of the Roman Catholic Clergy under your autho- 






CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



701 




rity, promises to afford so much comfort and relief to 
to such a pious, loyal and respectable body of men 
as the Roman Catholic Clergy of Scotland have con 
stantly shown themselves, and which I can have no 
doubt they will ever continue to be, while they have 
the benefit of such an example as you have invariably 
given them. With every good wish for your future 
health and happiness, I remain with much respect 
and regard, 

" Reverend Sirs, 
" Your very faithful, humble servant, 

" HENRY DUNDAS." 

Another proof of the liberality of our statesmen in 
the closing days of last century, and which shows also 
the general declirje of bigotry, was presented by an 
order of the Adjutant-General to the effect that non 
commissioned officers and men should be permitted 
to attend divine worship in the churches, chapels, or .V 
meeting houses - to , which they belong, when an 
opportunity for their doing so "should offer. 

Government, to their credit, let it be recorded, lost 
i y.i* - : v , -" " 

no opportunity of moderating the wrath of persecu 
ting lairds. A tyrannical proprietor had lodged a 
groundless accusation against a priest. The Lord 
Advocate declined to entertain it, and only took 
occasion to request Bishop Hay to assist him in pro- 



7O2 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



moting better feelings between the priest and Laird 
of Barra. 

Now that the French were away from Rome, an 
army of twenty thousand Neapolitans having driven 
them from the city, a few months after they had 
seized it, Mr. Sloane, the devoted friend, as we have 
seen, of the Scotch College, thought that the time 
had come for the restoration of the College and its 
estates. He accordingly addressed Sir William 
Hamilton at Naples, asking him to use his influence 
for the recovery of so much British property. It was 
too soon. But neither Mr. Sloane nor any one else 
could foresee, at the time, that the French had not 
yet done with Rome. The Bishops, meanwhile, 
were making amends for the loss of the Colleges 
abroad by establishing seminaries at home. The 
Ministers of the Crown looked with favour on this 
work of the- Bishops. They, as well as all other public 
men, were*agreed as to the importance of encourag 
ing the education of Catholic priests at home, con 
ceiving it to be an essential part of a good education 
to be made acquainted with the principles of the 
British Constitution. It was with a view to this 
great advantage that so much was done in more 
happy times, especially by Sir John Hippisley, 
in order to obtain national Superiors for the British 
Colleges. Sir John now held the opinion that if 




CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



703 



Bishop Hay could procure an adequate establish 
ment for ecclesiastical education in Scotland, he 
would never have cause to regret the loss of the 
Roman College. 

The severe and prolonged sufferings of the invalid 
Bishop at Aberdeen were now drawing to a close. 
In the earlier half of January there was an aggrava- 
tion of his ailments. His back was laid open in two 
places, by bed sores, which, as he was obliged to lay 
in one position in bed, were of the worst description. 
Mortification supervened. Meanwhile the sufferer 
was a pattern of patience. He never complained of 
pain. It was frosty weather and the attending phy 
sician, Sir Alexander Bannerman, expressed the 
opinion that, as soon as a thaw set in, the final 
change would come ; and accordingly it came, slowly 
. and surely, like the maladies by which it was pre 
ceded. It began on Saturday, February 9th, and, 
was complete, all suffering at an end the following M 
Monday at five o clock in the afternoon. " The snow 
churchyard (Sta. Maria ad Nives) was chosen for the 
place of his funeral. There was a large gathering 
of mourners, including the more notable people of 
the city. The Professors of King s College Univer 
sity, proprietors of the beautiful cemetery, declined 
to accept the usual fees. They desired no more than 
the signal honour that the bones of so great and so 






. 



704 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



good a man were laid at rest within their ground. 
Almost all the learned Bishop s printed works in 
cluding his tract, " Watcli and Pray," a second edition 
of which was issued shortly before his death, have 
been already herein alluded to. He left, besides 
several manuscripts which are accessible to all who 
desire seriously to consult them ; and will long be held 
to be a treasure of no ordinary value to the student 
of history. They are, as follows : ist, A Catalogue of 
the Scotch Missionaries ; 2nd, A short account of 
Mr. Ballantyne, first Prefect of the Mission ; 3rd, An 
Account of the Bishop s Journey to Paris in 1791, on 
the affairs of the Scotch College ; 4th, A Letter to 
the Scotch Agent in Rome on his duties; 5th, 
Observations relating to .the Catholic Missions in 
Scotland; 6th, A Short Account of the state of 
Religion in Scotland in 1 745-46 ; 7th, Observations 
on the -duties of a Catholic missionary. .It is also 
said, and on competent authority, that Bishop 
> Geddes was the author of a Life of Cardinal Innes, 
" which appeared in the Antiquarian Transactions, 
. about 1794 ; and was republished in the Edinburgh 
Monthly Register, June, 1816. 

When the Bishops of Scotland were incurring so 
much expense providing seminaries at home in place 
of the colleges abroad of which they were deprived, 
a new calamity came to aggravate their difficulties. 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



/05 



- 



They had been in the habit of receiving, hitherto, 
substantial aid from the Congregation of Propaganda. 
This great institution which did so much to maintain 
the Christian faith in many countries and establish it 
in others, was now robbed of its properties by the 
Revolutionists and reduced to poverty. The usual 
remittance to the Scotch mission could no longer be 
looked for. This evil, however, was soon repaired 
through the generosity of a pious and wealthy person 
in Spain who contributed, yearly, a sum equal to what 
was expended by Propaganda for the support of the 
missions and colleges that were confided to its care. 
The benefactor chose to remain unknown. The 
news of this liberality gave the greatest joy and con-; 
solation to Pius VI., and he thanked God who thus 
extended pr5tection to His afflicted Church. 

The. shameful conduct of the French towards 
.the Church and its venerable chief brought no 
blessings with it. Not only were they driven 
from Rome. In Upper Italy their army, under- 
Scherer, was beaten by the Austrians and Russians/ 1 
commanded by Suwarroff. They took Milan and 
threatened Piedmont. It was soon learned that they 
had advanced as far as Susa, and it was announced 
in the Paris Gazette that Suwarroff, Commander of 
the Imperial armies, had orders to use his utmost 
efforts for the deliverance of the Pope. The dread 



7o6 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



of the Holy Father being rescued caused him to be 
conveyed to Valence, where he died. General 
Scherer was succeeded in the command of the army 
of Italy by the celebrated Moreau. Under Scherer 
began, under Moreau was completed the loss of Bona 
parte s conquests. The latter fell back before 
Suwaroff to the foot of the Alps. He then resigned 
and was replaced by General Joubert, who fell by a 
bullet wound at the commencement of the battle in 
which the French were defeated. The Russians 
penetrated into the French departments of Mount 
Blanc and the higher Alps (Hautes Alpes). But 
they were beaten at Zurich by Masseaa. Thus were 
the danger and disquietude of the French Republic 
diminished, but far from ended. 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



CAP. LVII. 

COMBINATION AGAINST THE FRENCH REVOLUTION 

THE igTH " BRUMAIRE " BONAPARTE THE EXE 
CUTIVE POWER THE ELECTION OF PIUS VII. 

FAVOURED BY THE GREAT POWERS JOYFUL- 

. DEMONSTRATIONS AS HE REPAIRED TO ROME 

RUSSIA S IMPERIAL SALUTE HOPES OF THE SCOTCH 

BISHOPS - - PECUNIARY RELIEF SEMINARY RE 
MOVED TO AQUORTIES BISHOP HAY FIRST PRESI 
DENTHIS PATIENCE IN TEACHING HIS HABITS. 

-USE OF TOBACCO HIS KINDNESS TO STUDENTS 

STATESMEN RECOMMEND HAVING FEW STUDENTS 

TOGETHER HENCE BISHOP CHISHOLM FOUNDS A 
SEMINARY AT LISMORE -EXCELLENT SITE, PRICE: 

4>950- 

France, stripped of its most brilliant conquests and; 
.driven back upon its frontiers, was threatened by a: 
most formidable coalition. Great Britain, Germany,, i 
Russia, and even Turkey, provoked by the invasion of 
Egypt, made common cause with the rest of Europe^* 
against France, and prepared to drive the French 
>from Ancona. The people of Italy, disgusted by- 
the impiety of the French Republicans, their pillage 
of the Sanctuary of Loretto and the persecution of 







708 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 






the Pope, welcomed the Austrians and Russians as 
liberators. The King of Naples had declared himself 
in favour of the coalition ; and the King of Spain, if 
he had dared, would have done the same. Suwarroff, 
who, in 1 794, had given the last fatal blow to Poland 
in order that it might be finally partitioned between 
Russia, Austria and Prussia, would not have been 
sorry to give a like fate to revolutionary France. 
The French Republic, thus threatened from without 
by Europe in arms, , was seriously disturbed in 
teriorly by conspiracies, by Vendeans, Chouans, 
etc. It was sick at heart, and sick to death. Its 
failure was a prelude to the most despotic monarchy. 
Napoleon Bonaparte arrived from his Egyptian 
^xile ; and the French Revolution, although it en 
joyed for a little while tlie name, was no longer the 
thing called a Republic. The iSth " Brumaire," 
and Napoleon Bonaparte was the sole executive 
power with the army at his command. This un-.; 
looked for event took the world by surprise. A still 
\nore astonishing event was in store the election of 
another Pope. After the deportation of Pius VI. and , 
the occupation of Rome and Italy by the French, in 
fidelity, heresy and schism held the opinion, even 
openly declared, that the Papacy was used up, and 
Pius VI. would have no successor ; and, indeed, what 
human aid could be counted on ? There was not a 



, 








CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



709 






power that had not shown hostility. All the European 
powers, meanwhile, including Turkey, had formed a 
coalition against the revolutionary power of France. 
Hence, Europe in arms, commanded peace. The 
conclave assembled at Venice, an Austrian City. 
The armed powers, not excepting Russia and the 
sublime Port kept watch at its gates. Peace reigned 
supreme. Christendom, it is no exaggeration to say, 
held its breath in expectation of the coming spiritual 
chief. The Cardinals, undisturbed and without fear of 
disturbance, proceeded with their usual slowness and 
deliberation to the election of a Sovereign Pontiff. 
Several Cardinals were named and well supported ; 
but for want of the requisite number of votes and 
other causes their candidature did not succeed. 
Curiously enough, Cardinal Chiaramonti was not 
thought of till Secretary Consalvi suggested that he 
should be declared a candidate, . To this no Cardinal 
objected but himself, and a. whole fortnight elapsed 
before his opposition was overcome. This amiable 
and affectionate dignitary was well known to possess 
every quality essential to a Pope; and, accordingly, 
he at once obtained the necessary number of votes, J 
two-thirds of the whole. The rest acceding he was 
unanimously elected. There was but one opponent, 
Chiaramonti himself. He could not, however, resist 
the general will. , 



: 















10 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



The Court of Vienna appeared to be offended by 
the election of Chiaramonti. They ungraciously re 
fused to let him be crowned in the Church of St. 
Mark. On the 2 1 st of March, the cermony of crown 
ing took place in the Church of St. George, Cardinal 
Anthony Doria, Dean of the Cardinals deacon, offi 
ciating, The Austrians spoke of retaining the Pope 
at Venice. They even thought of inducing him to 
take up his abode at Vienna. When Bonaparte 
reached the plains of Italy, they no longer opposed 
the departure of the Pope. He took passage, 
accordingly, in an Austrian frigate, and landed at 
Pesaro. He thence journeyed to Rome. He was 
received at Ancona amid salvos of artillery. The 
Russian ships stationed at the port, gave an imperial 

s 

salute according to the orders of their Emperor, Paul 
I., six hundred Anconians unyoked the horses of his 
carriage, and, using ropes ornamented with ribbons 
of different colours, drew it to the palace of the 
Cardinal Bishop. About eight months before, the 
Neapolitans, assisted by some Austrian squadrons 
and two hundred British infantry, drove the French 
: from Rome. They were now displeased at the 
arrival of the Pope, who entered Rome on the 3rd 
of J une, 1 800, the whole people making excessive 
demonstrations of joy. The Naples Government was 
obliged to recall from Rome all its troops ; but con- 









CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



tinued to occupy Benevent and Ponte Corvo, which 
were provinces of the Holy See. 

As the Bishops of Scotland had grieved over the 
deportation of Pius VI., so they now rejoiced on. 
hearing of the advent to Rome of his successor. 
They hoped, through a continuance of Pius VI I. s 
prosperity, to derive some benefit from the Roman 
College, and to obtain the usual aid from Propa 
ganda. Meanwhile their financial difficulties were 
so far relieved by a timely bequest. Mr. Alexander 
Menzies, a religious Benedictine of the Pitfodels 
family, died at Achintoul, where he had been for 
some time chaplain. He had formerly been a mem 
ber of the community at Ratisbon. He was much 
and generally regretted ; but by none more than by 
Bishop Hay, who, having the greatest confidence in 
his judgment and sincerity, often consulted^ him. 
The brethren of Ratisbon were not always conspi 
cuous for their liberality. v It was otherwise, how 
ever, with Mr. Menzies and Abbot Arbuthnot. - Mr.- 
Menzies left a letter to be delivered by Bishop Hay} 
to the Abbot, in which he requested that, at least," 
half of several hundred pounds which he left behind 
him, should be given to the fund of the secular 
mission. He also left a will in which Bishop Hay 
was named sole executor. The Abbot was to have 
the offer of all his money. The poor were to have 








CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 

what the sale of his clothes might bring. His books 
and linen, he requested, might be given to his brother 
monk, Mr. Robertson. Abbot Arbuthnot, in com 
pliance with the deceased brother s last wishes, and 
also from a spirit of liberality, for it was fully in his 
power to do otherwise, consented to a division of 
Mr. Menzies money between the monastery and the 
mission. The half amounted to something more 
than ^"400. 

In July, 1799, the seminary was removed from 
Scalan to Aquorties. The -Bishop himself was the 
first president at the new house, which, at first, could 
maintain only six students although there was room 
for thirty, so great had been the expense of prepar 
ing the building. This inconvenience was only 
temporary, and in course of some time the seminary 
had Jts full complement of thirty pupils, with a suit 
able staff of professors and servants. It cost the 
"Bishop a great deal to leave Scalan, to which he was, 
much attached. It grieved him also to part with the 
good people of the neighbourhood. The very 
remoteness and solitude of Scalan had a charm for 
him. The cultivated and fertile fields around it with 
its picturesque mountain scenery must be exchanged 
for the bleak and dreary morass of Aquorties; for,, 
it was not then what it has since become, a beautiful 
and smiling farm. The charge of a few boys and 






. 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 









the tedious labour incident thereto, must have been 
a serious trial to a man of Bishop Hay s active 
habits, who had been so long accustomed to the best 
social intercourse and intimate relations with the 
distinguished men of the capital. But he had at 
heart the founding of an important educational insti 
tution and the sacrifice must be made. It was found 
that the actual cost of the buildings greatly exceeded 
the estimate. Hence, it came to be necessary that 
every shilling of his own which he could spare should 
be called for, before even a commencement could be 
made. It was not enough for the Bishop to super 
intend. He also took his share in the daily work, 
as long as, he was able. He taught the classes of 
mental philosophy and metaphysics, using as his 
text book Dr. Reid s Works on the Moral and 
Intellectual Powers. Besides lecturing on those 
subjects, .which he studied to explain with as much 
clearness as they admitted of, the Bishop has left 
behind him a monument of his patient and humble 
.industry in a mass of manuscript abridgments from 
many authors, for the use of his pupils, both at 
Scalan and Aquorties. It was probably as a relaxa 
tion from his more abstruse studies that he taught 
the rudiments of grammar, and was so fond of this 
work that he had a class of little boys engaged in it. 
He took pleasure in being with the students. He 






7 1 4 CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 

went to breakfast, dinner and supper with them in 
the refectory, and never failed to attend the evening 
prayers of the community in the chapel, and other 
religious exercises. All this did not hinder him from 
devoting several hours of the day to mental prayer 
and spiritual reading, sometimes in the chapel, some 
times in his room, and pretty often, out of doors. 
He celebrated Mass every morning, except when 
the state of his health required that he should take 
some refection at an early hour, or, perhaps, alittle 
medicine. 

The reader may, at first, be shocked when told 

that a Bishop of unquestioned holiness of life, 

indulged in the ugly habit of chewing tobacco. But 

let him have patience. One day the student who 

/icted as sacristan (afterdwards well known as the 

Rev. Mr. Carmichael), asked the Bishop how he 

came to acquire such a habit. He had no hesitation 

in satisfying the young man s curiosity. "Do you 

I think that for any cause I would continue* that nasty 

habit if I did not find it necessary ? I will tell you 

. the reason. I was long subject to a state of health 

Z which occasioned me violent headaches, and I tried 

every remedy I could think of to no purpose till I 

tried the daily use of small twist which keeps me in 

a much more healthy condition. Were I to give up 

chewing tobacco my old complaints and their bad 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



715 , 



effects would follow ; I am, therefore, to continue the 
ugly practice." Most drugs are unpleasant, but the 
patient who loves health more than he hates physic 
will, nevertheless gladly swallow them. 

The Bishop was much with the students in recre 
ation hours. They listened with delight to the many 
stones he could tell relating to bygone times. He 
thus amused, and, in amusing, instructed them. He 
often spent the winter evenings among them when . 
they played the Italian game of " cuckoos," distri 
buted prizes and otherwise contributed to their 
amusements. 

When any of the boys were sick, the Bishop, who 
had not forgot his medical learning, not only pre 
scribed for them, but also administered medicines to 
them with his own hands. In the case of their being 

confined to bed, he often remained in the room with 
t 

them, saying his prayers and helping them by turns, 
with the tenderness of a nurse, till he saw they were 
better. 

It had been in contemplation to erect a College o n 
a large scale for both districts. The Government, - 
however, was opposed to the scheme. So much ill- ; 
will, prejudice, jealousy and rancour still prevailed , 
among the lower class of people towards Catholics/-: 
that there might be dangerous consequences if many 
students were assembled in one place. The Lord 



710 CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 

Advocate, therefore advised the Bishop to begin his 
seminary with a few pupils, and afterwards increase 
their numbers when circumstances warranted a 
change. This wise advice was not lost on the 
Bishops ; and Bishop Chisholm immediately set 
about- establishing a seminary for the Highland dis 
trict. The Island of Lismore was the locality 
selected by the Bishop. There was on this island a 
.suitable site which could be purchased. The pro 
prietor, Campbell, of Dunstaffnage, had erected on 
it a substantial house some years before. There 
was also an excellent garden. The land was good 
and limestone abundant. It was the opinion in 
Edinburgh that the purchase would be an advan 
tageous one at the price demanded, ,4,950. It was 
of easy access from Glasgow, which gave it addi 
tional advantages as regarded the conveyance of 
coal and other things necessary for the use of the 
establishment. Among .the many attractions of the ^) ; 
place there was one which could not fail to interest 
a Catholic purchaser. It had been the residence of . 
the Bishop of Argyle.- 



-- 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



717 




CAP. LVIII. 

GOVERNMENT GRANT DELAY SIR JOHN HIPPISLEY 

SUCCESSFUL COLLEGE PROPERTY AT ROME MR. 

ANDREW SCOTT AT HUNTLEY THE LIVES OF THE 

SAINTS DEMAND FOR RELIGIOUS BOOKS NEED 

OF A LARGE CHURCH AT EDINBURGH DIFFI 
CULTIES ELECTION OF PIUS VII. THE BISHOPS 

OFFICIALLY INFORMED -r- CONGRATULATIONS 

SCOTCH PROPERTY AT ROME CLAIMED FROM THE 

NEAPOLITAN GENERAL ITS DESPERATE CONDITION 

APPEAL TO BRITISH GOVERNMENT LETTERS 

TO ROME THE CLERGY PETITION FOR ADDITIONAL 

INCOME. 

There was difficulty and delay in obtaining pa y- 
memTof the money granted by Government for the 
benefit of the Catholic clergy in .Scotland. Sir John 
Hippisley was," on application, * informed that the 
Secretary of the Treasury had recieved orders to in 
timate to the Lord Advocate that the money would 
be paid in three weeks from the date of Sir John s 
letter (August 2;th, 1799). Nine weeks elapsed 
when Sir John went to the Treasury and was told 
that there was a difficulty, the Scotch Catholic clergy 
having no representative in London. On hearing 



. 



71 8 CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 

this, Sir John immediately wrote to Bishop Hay. 
requesting that he would lose no time in sending a 
power of attorney in his own name and that of 
Bishop Chisholm, authorizing him (Sir John) and 
Mr. Spalding, M. P. for the Galloway Burghs, to 
receive the money granted to the Scotch clergy. 
There was only a weekly mail to the nearest town 
from Moydart, where Bishop Chisholm was staying 
at his seminary. This remoteness of the Highlaud 
Bishop was the cause of further delay, but not the 
end of it. Sir John on presenting the power of 
attorney, was informed that there was so great a run 
on the treasury that the payment he desired could 
not be made sooner than shortly before Christmas. 
It proved however to be a good deal later. Only 
on the 2ist January, 1800, was the Procurator able 
to acquaint Bishop Hay that the money for the 
mission was-paid. Much it may be said, all, in this 
matter, was due to the determined perseverance of 
Sir John Hippisley. 

There was now some hope of recovering the 
College property in Rome, and it was decided that 
Mr. McPherson should resume his duties as agent. 
This re-appointment to his former office at Rome 
was much to his liking ; and a commission was pre 
pared, in the name of both the Bishops, empower 
ing him to act for them in recovering the property 



, 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



719 



of the mission in Italy. He was replaced in the 
mission of Huntly by Mr. Andrew Scott, who was 
afterwards so highly distinguished. Mr. Moir, a 
British resident in Rome, was empowered to act in 
the interest of the mission till the arrival of the 
agent. 

The reprinting of the Lives of the Saints now 
commenced was quite an undertaking. There appears 
to have been, at the time, a demand for religious pub- 
licatio ns. Bishop Hay s three best known works 
were out of print. 

The Catholics of Edinburgh conceived the idea 
of having one large church, in which both congre 
gations could meet, instead of the two small chapels 
in Blackfriar s Wynd. Mr. C. Maxwell, their pas 
tor, was at the head of the movement ; and proposed 
to purchase a house in the Canongate, which, accord 
ing to~his description/ was very eligible for the 
priest s residence, .while the garden attached to it, a 
.quarter of an acre in extent, presented a suitable site 
for the new church. It had been the city mansion 
of the Earl of Wemyss, by whom it was built. The 
price demanded was 1,000 guineas. The Bishop 
could not see any reason for encouraging the scheme- 
He told Mr. Maxwell that no dependence could be 
placed on subscriptions from the Catholice in the 
north. They had already aided in building chapels 






720 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



all over the country and were quite unprepared for 
any new call on their charity. As to the Bishop 
himself, owing to the many demands upon him, 
he was unable to give any assistance. All that 
he could do was to authorize the sale of the two 
old chapels in aid of the new building. 

This, however, could not be done until the pro 
posed chapel was ready for use. Mr. Maxwell could 
have no assurance that the inhabitants in the neigh 
bourhood of the intended site would not object to and 
oppose the erection of a Catholic chapel after the 
Catholics were committed to it by the purchase of the 
house. There was powerful opposition to have St. 
Margaret s chapel in the house that was purchased 
for it. The Bishop was met with a lawsuit, which, 
however, was decided, fortunately in his favour. If 
the project continued to be entertained, the Bishop 
would have .Mr. Maxwell break the matter to the" 
Lord Advocate and the Lord Prpvost, in order to- 
learn their opinion. He desired, moreover, to hear, 
what was said against the scheme, and particularly by - 
the Rev. Mr. Rattray, on whose judgment he placed 
great reliance. Mr, Rattray vigourously opposed the 
measure; and, first of all because a chapel in the 
Canongate would not be convenient for the congrega- " 
tion. In the second place, the house was too small 
for the residence of the clergy. It was only a wing 






CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



21 










of the house built by Lord Wemyss about 1 735. The 
actual proprietor, a bookseller, had bought it a few 
years previously, for ,350, and the value of houses 
in that part of the town had been falling ever since, 
the proprietors generally being glad to sell them at 
any price, and remove to the more fashionable new 
town. Notwithstanding all this, the wily bookseller 
had deceived Mr. Maxwell and persuaded him to offer 
1,000 for the remaining part of Lord Wemyss resi- - 
dence. Mr. Maxwell was indignant at Mr. Rattray s 
interference ; and it was not without difficulty that the 
latter succeeded in preventing a bargain from being 
concluded until the Bishop could be heard from. 
The Bishop, with his usual caution, declined to give 
a decision until he had learned everything connected 
.with the proposed scheme. He accordingly author 
ized Mr^ Rattray to obtain from the committee 
that was entrusted with the care of promoting the 
plan of the new chapel, an exact description of the . 
building which it was proposed to purchase, signed 
by every member o f the committee, together with all , 
other particulars that were calculated to throw light on 
the subject. Financial difficulties were also taken 
into consideration ; and finally, the idea of purchasing 
for 1,000 a house for which the proprietor had paid 
only 350, was abandoned. It was reserved for 
Bishop Hay s distinguished successor to ere:t a large 






722 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



and more handsome church in a suitable part of the 
city. While the discussion regarding the proposed 
new chapel was proceeding, the Bishop received 
official information from Cardinal Erskine of the 
election of Pope Pius VII. He immediately imparted 
the same to Bishop Chisholm, as well as to the clergy 
of his own district. It now became the duty of the 
Bishop to compliment the Holy Father on his acces 
sion to the Chair of Peter. He had never failed 
to fulfil this duty on former occasions ; and he now only 
waited for the concurrence of his colleague, Bishop 
Chisholm. It was decided, accordingly, that when 
the Bishops met in July they should send to Rome 
a joint letter of congratulation. In the meantime, 
Bishop Hay acquainted Cardinal Erskine with the 
wise intention. 

The Neapolitans having taken Rome, it was now 
thought that something might be done towards the,, 
.recovery of the Scotch property there. Mr. Moir, 
who held a letter of procuration authorizing him to- 
deal with this property, found that he was anticipated 
by a Mr. Fagan. This person, as soon as the cicy 
was occupied by the army of Naples, claimed resti 
tution of all British property from the Neapolitan. 
General. Mr. Moir, on this account, found it necesv 
sary to use his letter of procuration, but declined 
doing anything until the arrival of Mr. McPherson. 







CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 

This gentleman reached the city in July, 1800. 
He found the Scotch College and its property in a 
deplorable condition. " The house," he says, writ 
ing to Bishop Hay, " is going fast to ruin. It is let 
out to almost as many different families as there are 
rooms in it, all wretchedly poor creatures, unable to. 
pay the rent, or keep the house in repair. I wished 
Mr. Pagan to turn them out. He attempted to do- 
so, and could have done it at pleasure, a month or 
two back. But, ever since Cardinal Albani returned 
to Rome, they have got protectors enough among 
his creatures, and laugh at Pagan. I have seen the 
Cardinal. He says till Pagan resigns all his assumed 
power, he will do nothing. His minions do enough. 
In the meantime, I am obliged to take, up my quar 
ters elsewhere, and if ever I get into the College i t 
will now be with difficulty and not on the terms you 
and I expected. The old rector is jeturned and has 
by far more .interest in Albani s court than I. The 
vineyards, already. in a wretched state, will be in a. 
worse one before we have anything to do with them J 
They have been let by Mr. Pagan till the end of 
this year, for one hundred .and a few odd crowns. 
Hence, till autumn of 1801, though I get possession, 
the College, I cannot touch a half-penny of the 
revenues. But, to me it appears very improbable I, 
will get possession of it." (nth July, 1800.) .3 






724 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



In the same letter Mr. McPherson suggested that 
application should be made, through Mr. George 
Chalmers, who had always shown himself very friend* 
ly, to the British Ministry, asking them to use their 
influence with the Neapolitan Government, for com 
plete restoration to its rightful owners of the Scotch 
College and the property attached to it. 

Bishop Chisholm came in July to meet his 
colleague at Aquorties ; and there the two Bishops 
prepared their annual letters, one in Latin to the 
new Pope, and another in Italian, to Cardinal Borgia, 
Pro Prefect of Propaganda. These they enclosed in 
a complimentary letter to Monsignor Erskine. The 
routine of the annual meeting was diversified by the 
presentation of a petition to Bishop Hay by some of 
the clergy of his district, which could only be justified 
by the difficulties to which they were subjected in 
consequence of the scantiness of their incomes. s It 
requested that the Bishop would both urgently and . 
speedily use his influence with their congregations to 
induce them to raise their annual allowance to ^50. 
This does not appear to be an extravagant request, 
unless, indeed, the purchasing power of money was 
much greater at that time than it is now. The peti 
tion was adopted at a meeting of the clergy held at 
. Preshome, the preceding month of May. It was 
/presented by Messrs. Stuart and Scott on the part 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 725 

of their brethren. There was nothing unreasonable 
in the petition, as may be judged from the names 
that were appended to it, such as Mr. Paterson, after 
wards Bishop at Edinburgh, Mr. Mathieson, Mr. John 
Reid, Mr. George Gordon (late of DufTtown), Mr. 
James Carruthers and Mr. James Sharp. These 
clergymen were all highly esteemed by the Bishop. 
Their petition was, however, considered unreasonable 
since it was necessary to obtain a Government grant 
in order to provide for existing charges, and when the 
people were in a distressed condition, from the scarcity 
of provisions. Bishop Hay received it respectfully, 
but, finally, could not see grounds for entertaining it. 
In stating his reasons for declining, the Bishop inci 
dentally mentioned that thirty years before, the mis 
sion funds in the whole of Scotland, did not exceed 
60 a year. The accounts of 1769 show a home 
revenue of only ^"48 belonging to the, mission. Its 
foreign income was 200, with twenty-four mission 
aries to share it, while, .owing, to the exertions of the 
: Bishop (which was chiefly Bishop Hay s), they pro 
duced at the date of the meeting of 1 800, a yearly 
income of ^466, which was equal to a capital of 
more than ^8,000. 



* 






. 



726 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



CAP. LIX. 

THE BRITISH COLLEGES AT ROME THE NEW SEMINARY 

IN SCOTLAND SOLIDLY ESTABLISHED THE BISHOP 

OF THE HIGHLAND DISTRICT PURCHASES AN ELI 
GIBLE SITE FOR A COLLEGE IN THE ISLAND OF 
LISMORE, PRICE j^9S THE HIGHEST STATES 
MEN FAVOUR CATHOLIC EMANCIPATION THE CORO 
NATION OATH AN IMPEDIMENT SALARIES OF THE 

CLERGY A FALSE ACCUSATION VOTE OF CONFI 
DENCE IN THE BISHOP THE BISHOP DETERMINES 

ON PRESERVING THE SCOTCH COLLEGE AT ROME 
GRATITUDE TO THE GOVERNMENT, HONOUR AND 

LOYALTY TO THE KING OBJECTIONS TO THE 

CLERGY ACTING POLITICALLY THE SCOTCH COL- 

_ LEGE AT PARIS LARGER CHURCH NEEDED AT 

, EDINBURGH THE LORD ADVOCATE FAVOURABLE 

SUBSCRIPTIONS SITE VANDYKE S " DESCENT 

FROM THE CROSS " BISHOP CAMERON S RETURN 

WHY DELAYED MR. ANDREW CARRUTHERS ANI> 

CERTAIN REGULATIONS. 

Pius VII. had no sooner arrived in Rome than 
negotiations were recommenced with a view to have 
national superiors placed over the British and Irish 
Colleges. The agent was powerless. All the high 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



727 



. 

V 



--. 

. 



dignitaries were against him, with the exception of 
Cardinal York and the Secretary of Propaganda, 
Monsignor Brancadoro. They mistrusted the agent 
as an intruder on the exclusive privilege of the 
Italians. Opposed to their views was, it may be 
said, the whole power of the British Government, 
through the indefatigable exertions 1 " of Sir John 
Hippisley. This able and friendly diplomatist ad 
dressed letters on the subject to many of the Cardi 
nals and even to the Pope himself. In doing so he 
had the full support of the influence and authority of 
the British Government. At the same time all the. 
British and Irish Catholic Bishops united in present 
ing a memorial to His Holiness praying for the 
restoration of the National Colleges in Rome, and 
.that they should be placed on such a footing as to 
compensate in some degree, for the losses sustained 
in France. They prayed also that national superiors 
should be appointed over the Colleges. 
, The labours of the Bishop were at this tim<e very : 
severe, and the more so as he enjoyed not as yet the 
assistance of his recently appointed coadjutor. He 
was indefatigable in his visitations ; and the interest 
he took in the new seminary imposed on him addi 
tional care and work that would have afforded more 
than sufficient employment for his undivided energies. 
The low state of the College funds, consequent upon 







728 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



its transference to Aquorties, and the erection of a 
new building, added not a little to his cares. It could 
not yet compare with the ancient institutions of the 
continent ; but it was established on a safe and solid 
basis, and destined in due time to produce abundant 
fruit. 

1781. The Bishop of the Highland district now 
set about accomplishing the purpose which the 
Bishops had intimated to Propaganda. The Island 
of Lismore was selected for a site. The proprietor, 
Campbell, of Dunstaffnage, a few years before had 
built on the island a substantial house, attached to 
which there was an excellent garden. The land was 
good, and there was abundance of limestone. It was 
the opinion in Edinburgh that it was a good purchase 
at the price required, .4,950. It was verv accesible 
from the great commercial city of Glasgow, a circum- 
stance-which gave it great facilities for the convey 
ance of coal and such other things as were necessary 
. .; for the use of the seminary. It was an .additional 
recommendation that it had once been the residence 
of the Bishop of Argyle. - f 

The services and influence of Sir John Hippisley 
had been mainly instrumental in obtaining a grant of 
money to the mission from the Government. He 
now renewed negotiations for obtaining a remittance 
of this grant, and was favoured with the promise that 









CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



729 









i, 




a payment of 1,600 would be made within forty days. 
About the same time this active and friendly public 

9 

man informed Mr. McPherson that the British Cabi 
net* was divided on the subject of Catholic Emanci 
pation. Mr. Pitt, .Lord Spencer, Lord Grenville, 
Mr. Dundas and Mr. Wyndham were in favour of 
granting the boon, and in consequence resigned. 
King Georg-e III. had scruples in regard to his Cor 
onation Oath which could not be overcome. All 
arguments he treated as incomprehensible meta 
physics. Such, at least, was Mr. Dundas experience 
of the royal mind. When pressed by this Minister, 
with cogent reasoning, he told the great statesman 
that lie would Jiave none of hw Scotch metaphysics. 

The clergy, this year, renewed their application for 
an increase of salary, insisting that the Bishop should 
lay upon their congregations the 9bligation of con-: 
tributing towards their support. This request was j 

" * "* - <-.. I >.:.?,* . X "*, ~**t -. .< - - : 

> met by a determined refusal, the Bishop holding that 
.such contributing ought to be left to the free will of 
the people. The influence of the pastors with their 
flocks, one would suppose, might have prevailed so 
far as to induce them to add something to salaries 
that were so small and insufficient. The clergy, 
nevertheless, persisted clamourously in their repre 
sentations to the Bishop, and even went so far as to 
accuse him of appropriating the money granted by 



730 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



Government to his own use and that of his seminary. 
They were encouraged in this idea by the knowledge 
that each student in his new College cost him ^27 a 
year. The procurator, Mr. C. Maxwell, who knew 
all the details, concurred with the Bishop in stating 
that the money in question had been properly distri 
buted. This statement, coming as it did, from the 
li-ad \f the opposition, ought to have satisfied the 
malcontents. In this matter, however, the procur 
ator could not oppose the Bishop, as, owing to the 
duties of his office he was perfectly conversant with 
the facts of the case. A few of the clergy, notwith 
standing, on whom their poverty pressed heavily in 
<> season of scarcity, would not take his word, and 
continued in their course. The Bishop, hitherto, had 
not made sufficient account of public opinion, which, 
if, rightly informed, would have supported him. A 
full statement of the distribution of the funds was 

. . i -.>"-. * *- * "* 4* t -i/? " " ;* f V- . i- 

laid before a meeting of the administrators and a 
deputation of the discontented clergy at Aberdeen. 
With this statement all were satisfied, as they 
could not fail to be. There only remained the humil 
iation of the Bishop being judged by his subordinates; 
and this might have been avoided if, in deference to 
opinion, he had made an earlier statement as to how, 
through the procurator, the funds in question had 
been disposed of. The scheme of division originated 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



731 







with the Government ; and it behoved the Bishops 
to carry it out. A unanimous vote of confidence was 
passed in Bishop Hay s honour and integrity, and re 
corded in the minutes of the meeting. It was . 
declared, moreover, that all past complaints against 
"him were nothing better than vague and unfounded 
assertions, deserving only *to be totally disregarded. 

At this time (1801) the Scotch College at Rome 
Avas deeply in debt ; and, as the mission at home was 
unable to do anything towards relieving it, the only 
way of removing the liabilities appeared to be to sell 
the College properties. To this ,plan, however, the -. 
Bishop was opposed so long as there remained a 
chance of retrieving its fortunes. 

At a meeting of administrators held this year, 
inquiry was made as to the precise nature of the 
transactions with Government, and the proceedings 

* ;</.- ^ - , 

were appropriately terminated with a letter of thanks 
addressed by the meeting to Sir John Hippisley as 
the sincere and disinterested friend and benefactor 
of the mission. It was requested in the letter, that, 
as a new favour, Sir John would assure His Majesty s " 
Ministers of the heartfelt gratitude of the Scotch 
clergy for the late act of benevolence ; and of their 
-habitual disposition to cultivate in their own minds, 
* and to propagate among their people sentiments of. ; 
loyalty to His Majesty s sacred person, and of attach- . 



732 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



ment to the happy Constitution under which they 
lived Sir John lost no time in returning a suitable 
reply to this complimentary and loyal address. 

A contest for the representation of Aberdeenshire 
being near at hand, it was not unreasonable that Sir 
John should look to the Scotch Bishop for some 
jeturn of the favours which the Government had so 
liberally bestowed. Mr. Ferguson, the Government 
candidate, had warmly seconded Sir John s appeal 
to Mr. Dundas for a grant to the clergy, and had 
borne ample testimony to the loyalty of the Catholics 
in his neighbourhood. None knew better than Sir 
John Hippisley that the Catholic clergy could not 
prudently take an active part in a contested election ; 
but if Bishop Hay could fall upon some means that 
would not be open to any reasonable objection, of 
promoting Mr. Ferguson s candidature, it would be 
a favour to-himself as well as to the. Government. \;; 
; The Bishops held their annual meeting "this year 
.at Aberdeen. The affairs of the Scotch .College in 
France engaged their attention. As there was a 
prospect of peace, they were encouraged to hope 
for the recovery of, at least, a part of the mission 
property. Sir John Hippisley readily took part in 
the necessary negotiations. The Bishop memorial 
ized the Foreign Secretary, Lord Hawkesbury, re 
questing him to promote the realizing and withdraw- 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



733 







ing from France all the property of the mission, 
both at Paris and at Douai ; and the transference of 
it to Scotland. Meanwhile, the ex-Principal, Mr. 
Gordon, had returned to Paris and did everything in 
his power to thwart Mr. Innes. who acted for the 
mission. Such proceeding greatly increased the 
difficulty of negotiations, which, even without this 
hindrance, were not of the most facile description. 
Bishop Hay was obliged to journey to Edinburgh in 
November, in order to take counsel with Mr. Max 
well and Mr. Farquarson on the subject. The result 
of this consultation was that Mr. Innes received full 
power to represent the interests of the mission and - 
to act for the Scotch Bishops. Finally, Mr. Far 
quarson was sent to Paris in order to assist him. 

At this time there was a great desire among the 
Catholics to have a larger and more handsome church V 
.at ^Edinburgh. The scheme of Mr. C. Maxwell 
having been discarded as impracticable, Mr. .Rattray 
conceived a design less open to objection. He began 
by -conciliating the good will of the chief public men." 
He addressed the new Lord Advocate, Mr. Hope, 
intimating the proposal, and requesting his concur 
rence. The ex- Lord Advocate, now Chief Baron of 
Exchequer, was also consulted and asked to concur. 
Mr. Hope, on his own part and that of his predeces 
sor, with much politeness, declined to offer any 






734 CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 

opposition to the proposed plan; but reminded Mr, 
Rattray of the strong prejudice that still existed in 
the country against his form of religion, and, there 
fore, advised him to do nothing that might excite i:. 
The more quietly the matter could be managed the 
better ; and the subscription ought not to be publicly 
advertised. He himself, as a member of the Estab 
lished Church, regretted that weak brethren might 
consider it an impropriety if the subscription opened 
with his name. He promised, however, to protect 
any of the Catholics who might, in future, be exposed 
to the illegal opposition or the insults of misguided 
people. Mr. Rattray having thus far provided 
against opposition at home, set about securing funds 
for the proposed undertaking. His chief hope lay in 
the English Catholic body, although, at the same 
time, the aid of his Scotch friends was not to be 
despised. . Mr. Marmaduke Maxwell, of Terreagles r 
was among the first to place his name on the subscrip 
tion list, and for the munificent sum of 100 guineas; 
Mr. Weld, of Lulworth, also co-operated; and r 
finding that "good Bishop Hay" was still in life, 
begged Mr. Rattray to assure him of his venera 
tion and esteem for him. The distinguished banker, 
Sir William Forbes, who was the chief pillar of 
the Episcopalian body, gave his name for 10. 
Early in the year 1802 the subscriptions amounted to 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



735 






900. Among the subscribers were the Duchess of 
Buccleugh, Lord Moira and other Protestants. Not 
a little of this liberality was due to the memory of 
Bishop Gedfles, most of the contributors being among 
his personal friends. As was to be expected, Dr. 
Alexander Wood, Bishop Hay s old and devoted 
friend, subscribed. Mr. Rattray was eminently suc 
cessful among all classes ; so much so that he thought 
little of an English Catholic nobleman s subscription 
of 5, although it was accompanied by a promise to 
solicit other subscriptions. As the subscriptions 
were proceeding, a site for a church and house adjoin 
ing was purchased between St. James Square and 
York place. It measured one hundred and twelve 
feet by forty-five. The price was over 300. The 
time for building, however, had not yet arrived ; nor 
was the purchased site finally accepted. , It behoved 
it to give place to another in the same neighbourhood 
which : was in every way more convenient, and onu 
j which the pro-Cathedral now stands. A painting by ., 
Vandyke, representing the "Descent from the Cross," 
was the altar piece, and still remains so in the more 
recent church, if no better has been found, having 
survived all dangers. 

Although Mr. Farquarson remained at Paris till 
June, he did not succeed in accomplishing anything. 
He was anxious to regain his congregation in Glas- 



736 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



gow, which, during his absence, was without a 
pastor. Bishop Cameron joined him late in May, 
on his return from Valladolid, where he had officiated 
for some time as Bishop, and they travelled home in 
company. The new Bishop enjoyed great favour, 
and had many friends in Spain ; so it is not surpris 
ing that the whole city of Valladolid regretted his 
departure, which was considered as a serious loss. A 
false rumour ascribed to him the ambitious purpose 
of delaying his return to Scotland until he could 
rule the district alone. There was nothing farther 
from his mind, and his arrival, after much hindrance, 
relieved Bishop Hay of great difficulty and labour, 
which he was no longer able to undergo. The real 
causes of the coadjutor s delay were very different 
from what rumour had laid to his charge. All the 
time oj the war, the Spanish Minister refused to gtve 
him a passport. He was detained eighteen months 
by severe illness. For some time he was without 
money for his journey, the income of the College 
having been greatly diminished. The state of the 
College, also, which stood so much in need of im 
provement, required his presence ; and this necessity 
induced him to yield to the representations of his 
friends and advisers at Valladolid, who concurred in 
detaining him. He left the College in an improved 
condition. Mr. Wallace remained there as. one of 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



** ->7 
/ OJ 




the masters, together with Mr. Gordon and Mr. 
Cameron, the new Bishop s nephew. 

There occurred about this time a curious instance 
of a priest requesting the Bishop to give him infor 
mation regarding matters of quite a rudimentary 
kind. Tfris priest was no other than Mr. Andrew 
Carruthers, the chaplain at Munshes, at the time still 
a young man. For an answer to the first three of his 
queries, the Bishop referred him to the Stotutia Mw- 
si>mis, remarking that however well his correspondent 
might have studied, he had overlooked hitherto the 
manual of his daily duties. For the solution of 
another difficulty, .Mr. Carruthers was advised to 
study a certain chapter and section of the Sincere 
Christian, a work which could scarcely have escaped 
the notice of any priest in Scotland. There was only 
one point of general interest, and one of which little : , 
.could be learned from books. There appears to have - 
prevailed in Galloway at that time, the custom of 
abstaining from eggs on Ash Wednesday and Good 
Friday. , The Bishop, when he first came to the 
mission, understood from his predecessors that all 
lacticinea f or, white meats, were used in Lent as .com- ; ; 
mon food, and for the very satisfactory reason that 
by far the greater number of the Catholics in Scot 
land had no other kind of food at that season of the 
year. The long winter and late spring deprived . 



.-,,:; .:-,- :. 



738 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



them of vegetables ; and milk, even, was often scarce 
when Lent began early. The Bishop found, how 
ever, that eggs were not universally used in Lent. 
All the churches and chapelries which, in Catholic 
times, were included in the Archiepiscopal Province 
of St. Andrews, by virtue of an ancient privilege, 
handed down by constant tradition, made use of eggs 
from the second Sunday in Lent till Palm Sunday. 
During the first ten days of Lent and Holy Week 
they abstained from eggs. The other Scotch parishes,, 
not in the Province of St. Andrews, abstained from 
eggs during the, whole of Lent. Hence, the parish 
of Bellie, in the Enzie, enjoyed the privilege, while 
the neighbouring parish of Rathven was denied it. 
Thus, too, at Aberdeen, eggs were not used in Lent, 
but were in the Mearns, south of the river Dee. It 
was also known to the Bishop that, in some inland 
places,~far from the sea, especially in. the Highlands,, 
where the winters were longer and the springs later; 
it had become a custom to use eggs during Lent,, 
except in the first and last weeks. 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



739 






CAP. LX. 

BISHOP CAMERON AS COADJUTOR BISHOP HAY S LOAN 
WITHOUT INTEREST TO THE NEW CHURCH OF 
ABERDEEN DEATH OF REV. GEO. MAXWELL, S. J., 

AT THE AGE OF NINETY HIS GIFT OF ^4OO TO* 

STONEYHURST LIBERAL ALSO TOWARDS THE SEM 
INARIES OF SCOTLAND RELIQUES ; A SILVER 

THURIBLE AND REMONSTRANCE OF HOLYROOD 

BISHOP , CAMERON AT EDINBURGH ; HAS SOLE 
CHARGE OF THE COUNTRY SOUTH OF THE GRAM 
PIANS BISHOP HAY TRANSFERS THE MISSION PRC5- 

PERTY HELD IN HIS NAME TO TRUSTEES BISHOP 
CHISHOLM TAKES POSSESSION OF HIS SEMINARY 

IN THE ISLAND OF LISMORE MEETS BISHOPS HAY 

AND .CAMERON AT , AQUORTIES -MGR. ERSKINE-: 
CARDINAL BECOMES CARDINAL PROTECTOR WAR/ 

^BETWEEN FRANCE AND GREAT BRITAIN PASTORAL/ 

IN SUPPORT OF GOVERNMENT NEW PRAYER FOR- 

THE KING BISHOP CAMERON AND THE SPANISH 

EMBASSY CHIEF DUTY ON THE COADJUTOR MR.- 

.ENEAS CHISHOLM CHOSEN BISHOP OF HIGHLAND- 
DISTRICT BISHOP MILNER--HOW BISHOP CAMERON- 

TRAVELLED REPORT TO ROME FROM THE HIGH- 

- LANDS MR. .ENEAS CHISHOLM s CONSECRATION- 









740 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



DELAYED THE " DEVOUT " AND " PIOUS CHRIS 
TIAN " TRANSLATED INTO FRENCH THE AUTHOR S 
AUTOBIOGRAPHY BISHOP HAY STRUCK WITH PAR 
ALYSIS RALLIES REMITTANCE OF 2OO CROWNS 

AND CONGRATULATIONS TO THE SCOTCH BISHOPS. 

We now find Bishop Cameron acting for the first 
time as coadjutor. In August, 1802, he met the 
Bishops of both districts at Edinbnrgh, and transacted 
together with them the usual business of the annual 
meeting. In the letter to Propaganda it was men 
tioned that Bishop Hay s memory had failed so 
"much more as to leave him often without words to ex 
press his meaning. After the meeting he began his 
journey back to Aquorties in company with Bishop 
Cameron. The latter spent a month among his 
friends in the North, and then returned to Edinburgh 
/or the winter. 

A new and better church was now provided at 
Aberdeen, Mr. Gordon having zealously exerted him 
self in obtaining subscriptions among his friends. 
Bishop Hay contributed in the form of a loan of 
^300 without interest. 

It would be a serious omission not to record the 
death, at ninety years of age, of a venerable priest 
who had long and faithfully served the mission. This 
was none other than the ex-Jesuit, Mr. George Max- 
well There was no other disease than the decay 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



741 



incident to old age. His servant found him one day 
in his chair in a state of stupour. Mr. C. Maxwell 
hastened to his assistance, and at once administered 
Extreme Unction and the last blessing. Immediately 
after this he departed to his rest. Mr. Maxwell was 
a liberal contributor to the Seminary which his former 
brethren of the suppressed Order established at 
Stoneyhurst. His offering was ^400 in gold. Not 
withstanding some difference of opinion as to the 
property of the ex- Jesuits in , Scotland, there was 
always a warm friendship between him and Bishop 
Hay, who highly esteemed him and often consulted 
him. He bequeathed his money, with the exception 
of the sum already mentioned, to his Order in the 
event of it being restored, and the interest thereof, 

in the meantime, to the Seminaries of Scotland. 
* . . - 
In connection with Mr. Maxwell s will, the Bishop 

found if necessary to visit; Edinburgh. On his 
return to Aquorties he wrote a long letter to his 
coadjutor in which he complains of his fast de- 
clining health which was greatly impaired by his 
recent journey. In the same letter he refers to a 
relic of the by-gone time a silver thurible with in 
cense boat attached, together with a Remonstrance- 
cr Scleil for the exposition of the Blessed Sacrament. 
These all belonged of old to the Royal Chapel of 
Holyrood Palace, when the Duke of York, after- 






742 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



wards James VII. and II., held his Court there. 
The Bishop s friend, M. L Abbe Latil, desired to 
have these things as a loan for the use of his small 
congregation, and they were kindly sent to him. 

It does not appear that there was any want of cor 
diality between the Bishop and his coadjutor. The 
former certainly could not have given to the latter a 
warmer or more friendly welcome. The junior 
Bishop was now to reside at Edinburgh, a fitting 
place for the commencement of a career that was 
destined to be so bright. He was also entrusted 
with the sole charge of the country south of the 
Grampian Mountains. 

The chapel at Aberdeen was now so much 
enlarged that it might well be termed a church. In 
our day it would have this designation. 

Bishop Hay ..was now relieved of his more onerous 

*X s 

duties, the coadjutor, according to the arrangement 
entered into, having taken up his residence at Edin 
burgh. The congregation there was not destined as 
yet to have a new and more commodious church. 

The want of sufficient funds obliged Mr. Rattray 
to abandon his favourite scheme. The estimated 
*cost, ^4000, was beyond any that he had been able 
to collect. Meanwhile, Bishop Hay was devoting 
his time and his purse at Aquorties to* the improve 
ments of the Seminary. " I am now," he said, writing 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



743 



to Bishop Chisholm, " In a manner, out of the world, 
and with good reason, for, I am almost good for 
nothing." He was resolved, however, to do one good 
thing, and that was to transfer his property and the 
mission funds that were held in his name, to trustees, 
in order to avoid the uncertainty and expense of dis 
posing of it by will. The legacy duty alone at the 
time, a recent invention of financiers, was no incon 
siderable item ; litigation, which is always costly, 
might also have jeopardized the funds. 

Bishop Chisholm, before repairing to the annual 
meeting, took possession of his Seminary at Lismore. 
He then passed over the Grampain Mountains to 
Aquorties, where Bishops Hay and Cameron awaited 
him. The annual letters were prepared on the first 
of August. One of these was a complimentary 
letter to Mgr. Erskine on occasion of his elevation 
to the dignity of Cardinal. This, Prelate succeeded 
. .Cardinal Albani, a few months later, as Cardinal; 
Protector of Scotland. Propaganda had also a 
new Prefect in succession to Cardinal Borgia. He 
learned from the Bishop s annual letter to Propa- 
ganda the unwelcome fact that Bishop Hay s memory 
had so much failed that he could no longer attempt 
to preach or say Mass in pubiic. War had broken 
out anew between France and Great Britain. and 
became the occasion of a joint pastoral letter which 








p* " i 



744 CATHOLICS Of SCOTLAND. 

the Bishops issued before closing the meeting. In 
this letter the people were earnestly called upon to 
support the Government to the best of their ability, 
whether by enlisting for military service or by their 
" prayers. The letter was accompanied by a new 
prayer for the King and Royal Family. 

A circumstance now occurred which caused much 
concern and alarm to Bishop Hay. He dreaded 
lest he should be deprived of the aid of his coad 
jutor. Through the Abbe Latil, Chaplain to the 
exiled Royal Family of France, Bishop Cameron 
was offered the first chaplaincy of the Spanish Em 
bassy in London. Of the five Spanish chaplains 
already in office, not one knew a word of the Spanish 
language. In consequence of this rather singular 
circumstance, Bishop Cameron, if he had accepted 
office, must have resided constantly in London. It 
does riot-appear that he ever entertained .the idea of, 
accepting. But a charge so incompatible with the 

; exercise of his episcopal duties in Scotland was at 
once rejected. . .*; 

- Bishop Hay s growing infirmities induced him once 
.more to solicit from the authorities at Rome permis 
sion to transfer the duties of his office to his coad 
jutor. In writing to Cardinal Borgia on the subject 

, he gave such an account of his health as appeared to 
secure a favourable answer to his request. For two 










CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



745 




years he had not been able to say Mass in public. 
It was three years since he had preached, so great 
was the failure of his memory. The most familiar 
words escaped him, even in conversation. This 
made him adverse to visiting. He could hardly 
stand sometimes from attacks of giddiness and great 
weakness. He was not himself surprised at all this, 
as he had reached the seventy-fourth year of his age, 
and the forty-fourth of his missionary labours. The 
administration of the district besides could not be in 
more able hands than those of his coadjutor. 

New complications now occurred in the affairs of 
the Scotch College at Paris, in consequence of the 
death of Mr. Innes ; and there was less prospect than 
ever of recovering the property in France. 

Meanwhile, Cardinal Borgia consulted Bishop Hay 
as to the qualifications of the three candidates named 
for thecoadjutorship of the Highland district. Mr. 
ALneas Chisholm, a brother of the Bishop, was finally 
chosen. Soon after another letter from Rome con- 
S yeyed to Bishop Hay a polite refusal of his request. 
It may be said, however, to have been virtually 
granted, as, in the same letter he was advised to lay 
the chief burden of duty on his coadjutor, but still to 
retain in his own hands the office of Vicar Apostolic. 

The Right Rev. Dr. Milner, so celebrated in the 
history of the English Church, in a letter to Bishop- 



. 









746 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



Cameron, expressed the hope that " the venerable 
Bishop Hay was in good health," adding that he had 
the honour to be known to him twenty-five years 
ago, when he was in London. 

Rumours had got afloat to the effect that the Society 
of Jesus was re-established, and that Mr. John Pep 
per had renewed his vows at Stoneyhurst. Bishop 
Douglas, however, forwarded to Scotland a circular 
letter from Propaganda which conveyed the informa 
tion that all such rumours regarding the restoration 
of the Society, were unfounded ; but that they were 
still limited to the Russian Empire. 

We now find the Bishops preparing for the annual 
meeting. Bishop Cameron resolved to perform a 
part of the journey from Edinburgh on horseback. 
For this pnrpose he purchased a horse at Perth ; 
but a friend insisted on his accepting the loan of a 
gig in which he travelled by Bnemar, Strath down, 
Glenlivat and Huntley to the Seminary at Aquorties. 
From thence he conveyed Bishop Hay along with 
him in this easy kind of carriage to Preshome, where 
the meeting of Bishops took place this year in the 
middle of August. It was resolved that Mr. John 
Reid, who had served the mission of Preshome 
during forty years, should be allowed to retire with 
an annuity of ^50. The Bishops addressed a joint 
letter of congratulation to Cardinal Erskine on occa- 






CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



747 



sion of his succeeding to the Protectorship of the 
Scotch mission. Detailed replies were prepared to 
a number of questions regarding the statistics of both 
districts, addressed by Propaganda to the Bishops. 
It was the first time any report was ever presented 
by the Bishop of the Highlands. 

At the meeting of administrators, Bishop Hay was 
induced by his inability to remember words to resign 
the Presidency to his colleague, Bishop Chisholm. 
When there was question of anything important, the 
coadjutor spoke for him. 

Preparations had been made for the consecration 
of the Highland coadjutor ; but emigration and 
death had so much reduced the numbers of the 
clergy that Mr. ^Eneas Chisholm s services as a 
priest were required during the ensuing winter. 
Hence his consecration was delayed till the follow 
ing year. 

One of the last vigourous efforts of Bishop Hay 
was to dictate directions to his trustees regarding his 
fifty bank shares. His remarkable clearness in cal 
culation showed that his intellect still retained its 
power, although his memory had so greatly failed. 

Meanwhile, the reputation of Bishop Hay s theo 
logical works was spreading far and wide. The 
Devout and Pious Christian was now translated into 
the French language by a French Priest in America, 



74 CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 

for publication in France ; and the translator applied 
to Bishop Cameron for a biography of the author. 
This request was forwarded to Bishop Hay, who 
appeared to be quite indifferent to the proposal. He 
did, however, give the date of his birth, adding that 
he was of a " respectable family," that his father had 
"given him a full education in the medical line," that 
during his studies he had embraced the Catholic 
religion, and pursued a full course of theological 
studies at Rome ; that, returning to the mission in 
1759, he was consecrated Bishop and coadjutor in 
1764, succeeding to the Vicariate in the eastern dis 
trict of Scotland in 1778. This short notice was all 
that could be obtained for the zealous translator of 
his excellent works. 

The Bishop was still able to teach the students of 

philosophy. They were engaged with him in the 

study of. logic and natural philosophy. In these 

studies the Bishop employed Para s PJiysica as a 

-. text book. 

.The Bishop and his coadjutor were quite of one 
, .mind, contrary to what some people affected to sup 
pose. This pleasing fact is fully established by their 
confidential correspondence. 

The state of the Seminary at this time was very 

._ gratifying to the aged Bishop, and gave promise of 

- still greater improvement in the near future. There 



\m 



. .. >--. ,-jt.j- 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



749 




was favourable harvest weather and an abundant 
crop. The number of students had increased, and 
they- as well as their masters were in excellent health. 
In the midst of this prosperity there came a dismal 
cloud. On the night from 25th to 26th. of October, 
the Bishop, already so infirm, was struck with para 
lysis. He was unaware of the stroke, until he 
attempted to rise, when he felt that his right side 
was affected. He arose, however, and got into his 
chair, managing to dress himself without assistance. 
By the time he had done so, he was scarcely able to 
move or speak. He was immediately put to bed 
again, and medical assistance sent for. His mind, 
meanwhile, was not in the least affected. Towards 
evening, the oppression still continuing, he desired 
to receive the Viaticum, dreading lest later he should 
not be able to swallow. All that his physician could 
do was to recommend *wa.hnth -and friction. But he 
himself," remembering that anodyne plaster was used 
successfully in Spain for paralytic affections, had one 
applied to his loins. In consequence he passed -a ; 
good night, sleeping well, and appeared to be better 
next morning. His speech at the same time was 
less inarticulate. The plaster having succeeded so 
well, he applied it to his head and those parts of his 
limbs which were most affected. The results were 
excellent. Originally of a strong constitution, he 



750 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 







slowly rallied from the attack. By the 3oth of 
October he was able to leave his bed, dress and 
undress himself, and take his food with tolerable 
appetite. Next morning he rose*at seven, an early 
hour in the circumstances, but much later than his 
wonted time. His right side gradually recovered its- 
power, his defective utterance alone remaining. He 
attributed his restoration, under God, to the Spanish 
plaster ; and he would have no other remedy. 

Bishop Cameron continued to receive bulletins from 
Aquorties until there was no longer cause to appre 
hend immediate danger. He then wrote, assuring 
the Bishop that he prayed earnestly for his recover} , 
and that he also had the prayers and good wishes of 
his many friends at Edinburgh. The invalid, now 
so wonderfully convalescent, replied at some length 
to the kind letter of his coadjutor ; giving details of 
his attack and recovery, which are in every important 
particular the same as is here set down. Mr. Charles 
Gordon was employed on the occasion as the Bishop s 
amanuensis. 

As affairs became settled at Rome, Propaganda- 
renewed its liberality ; arid along with a remittance 
.of 200 crowns, addressed a letter of encouragement 
to the aged Scotch Bishops (February 9th, 1805), 
consoling them in their infirmities and congratulating 
them on having spent the greater part of their lives 
in the vineyard of the Lord with so much usefulness 
that they might say to the just Judge with the 
apostle of the Nations : " Ronuin certamen certavi" 









CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



75* 



CAP. LXI. 

BISHOP HAY PARTIALLY RESTORED DEATH OF HIS 

SISTER ASKS LEAVE TO RESIGN THE SAME 

GRANTED. 1805 CARDINAL ERSKINE, PROTECTOR 

OBTAINS FOR MISSION AND SEMINARY A GRANT 

FROM PROPAGANDA INJUSTICE OF NEAPOLITAN" 

GOVERNMENT THE BISHOPS FOR THE FIRST TIME 

ADDRESSED AS " MY LORDS " BISHOP HAY TRANS 
FERS THE WHOLE GOVERNMENT OF THE LOWLAND 

DISTRICT TO HIS COADJUTOR BISHOP CAMERON 

AT LISMORE CONSECRATED BISHOP AENEAS CHIS- 

HOLM CHANGES REV. ANDREW SCOTT*S CAREER 

OF 40 YEARS AT GLASGOW COMMENCES BISHOP 

HAY GRADUALLY DECLINING REMEMBERS HIS | 

I-RIENDS IN SEPTEMBER, 1807, SOME IMPROVE- 1 

MENT REMOVES TO EDINBURGH DINES WITH AN I 

OLD FRIEND SITS FOR HIS PORTRAIT RETURNS 

P- : -; .< v - 

V:;rO A^UORTIES INDICATIONS OF MENTAL DECAY 

STUDENTS FROM SPAIN AT THE SEMINARY- 
NEW CHURCH AT PAISLEY JOY OF THE INFIRM 

BISHOP IN l8lO HIS ILLNESS RAPIDLY INCREASES 

-IN APRIL, l8ll, RECOVERS FROM A SEVERE AT 
TACK ; BUT MENTAL POWER GONE BY I4TH 
OCTOBER HIS LIFE -WAS EBBING SLOWLY BUT 






- 
- 



752 CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 

SURELY AWAY NEXT DAY AT SIX O CLOCK IN 

THE EVENING THE GREAT BISHOP PASSED AWAY 
PEACEFULLY, EXPIRING WITHOUT A STRUGGLE- 
LOSSES OF THE MISSION DEATH OF CARDINAL 

ERSKINE FUNERAL OF BISHOP HAY ATTENDED BY 

PROTESTANTS AS WELL AS CATHOLICS HIS PLACE 
OF BURIAL WORDS OF REVS. MESSRS. RATTRAY 
AND JAMES CARRUTHERS. 

By March 9th (1805), Bishop Hay had so far 
recovered his powers as to be able to write a short 
autograph letter to Bishop Cameron, chiefly convey 
ing the information that his sister, Miss Hay, had 
lately died, and praying that her soul might be re 
membered. Owing to the great feebleness of the 
writer, the writing is weak, blurred, blotted and mis 
spelt. 

Employing as his amanuensis Mr. Gordon, one of 
the masters of the Seminary, the Bishop once more 
begged permission, to ^resign his office of Vicar- 
Apostolic, with its onerous duties. He, at the same 
time, requested a dispensation from the recitation of 
his office. He applied on this occasion first of all to 
.the Scotch agent at Rome, begging him to make 
interest for him with Cardinal Erskine. The letter 
gives, at considerable length, the Bishop s reasons 
for .. desiring to resign. The twofold dispensation 
from the recitation of the Breviary together with the, 



. 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



751 






-duties of Vicar- Apostolic, was granted on June i6th 
-at an audience of the Holy Father, Ex awlientia 
& Smi. 

When Mgr. Erskine became Cardinal Protector a 
brighter day appeared to have dawned for the Scotch - 
mission and its College at Rome. His Eminence 
made strong representations in their favour, and not 
without beneficial results. Propaganda, in its renewed 
liberality, remitted to the Procurator at Edinburgh a 
grant of 1,770 crowns ; and the College affairs were 
so prosperous that its debts were in the course of 
being liquidated in a few months. The Cardinal 
also had it in view to obtain for the College the long- 
desired boon of National Superiors. There was a 
hope, moreover, of regaining the Neapolitan abbacies. 
It proved vain, however ; and to this day they have 
not been restored. At the founding of the College/ 
Clement -VI 1 1. liberally bestowed funds, and more 
over, endowed it with an abbey in Calabria, and 
another near Benevento. Both together produced - 
about jCi 50 sterling yearly. The College remained 
in undisturbed possession of these benefices until the";* 
expulsion of the Jesuits from the Kingdom of Naples. 
They were, on occasion of that event, seized by the 
Crown as Jesuits property. The Neapolitan Gov- 
ernment ever since has found pretexts for refusing to 
restore them. This information was communicated 



\ 









754 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



by the agent at Rome to the Bishops, in a letter of 
1 3th of April, 1805. It may be remarked that this 
is the first letter of those times, in which we find the 
Bishops addressed " My Lords," the letter ending 
with " My Lords, Your Lordships most obedient, 
etc." It is addressed to the Right Reverend Dr, 
George Hay ; Right Reverend Dr. John Chisholm \ 
Right Reverend Dr. Alexander Cameron ; Right 
Reverend Dr. yEneas Chisholm. 

Towards the end of July Bishop Cameron visited 
Aquorties. Bishop Hay was at that time able to 
walk with him to Fetteritear, two miles distant, and 
to return on foot after tea, without being much 
fatigued. Before they separated, the Bishop, in a 
formal document, transferred the whole government 
of the Lowland Vicariate to his coadjutor. 

Bishop Cameron continued his journey to the 
Highland Seminary of Lismore, where he conse-^ 
crated Bishop ^neas Chisholm on the i5th of Sep 
tember. A few clays later the annual letters to Rome 
were prepared and signed, but for the first time 
without the name of Bishop Hay. And now some 
noteworthy changes took place. Mr. John Reid 
withdrew from the mission of Preshome, Mr. James 
Carruthers taking his place. Mr. Andrew Scott, 
succeeding Mr. Farquarson, commenced his career 
of successful labour at Glasgow, which was only 












CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



755 



- 






closed by his death forty years later. Mr. James 
Robertson, who had the reputation of being some 
what eccentric, became a professor at the College of 
Maynooth with the title of doctor. 

The Bishop s physical strength appeared to im 
prove. One day in October of this year, he walked 
to Fetternear in order to see a workman who had 
been run over by a cart and severely bruised. In 
less than two hours he returned to the Seminary. 
His mind was more at ease, the students giving less 
cause of anxiety than they had done for some time,-" 
The masters did all in their power to promote his 
comfort, providing him with a bell, and adding a. 
double door to his room, which caused all noises, 
from without to be less heard. 

In May, 1806, the Bishop s strength was so far . 
renewed that he undertook a journey to Edinburgh. 
The Bishops of the Highland district were there on 
his arrival, and his name appears along with theirs in 
the annual letters which they despatched, as usual, to 
, Rome. Mr. John Gordon, head master of the Sem 
inary, was his travelling companion ; and he returned 
home by Dundee towards the end of May, none the 
worse for his journey. Three weeks later, however, 
there .came another slight shock of paralysis, which 
weakened his limbs and temporarily impaired his 
speech. His vigourous constitution, nevertheless^ 



756 CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 

carried him through. He felt uneasy as to what 
might happen in the ensuing winter. Meanwhile, he 
did not forget his friends. In one of his letters he 
desired to be remembered to his old friend, Dr. 
Wood, of Edinburgh. He often sent kindly mes 
sages to Madame Bonnette, who was now the mistress 
of a flourishing dancing academy at Edinburgh. In 
the beginning of August, the enemy made another 
attack. It was slight, but lasted longer than the 
former one. He soon recovered through an applica 
tion of the anodyne plaster. Bishop Cameron 
showed his concern and his anxiety for the infirm 
Bishop s welfare, by writing to the Superiors of the 
Seminary a very feeling letter, in which he urged on 
all, students as well as professors, the duty of bestow 
ing the greatest care in alleviating the sufferings of 
the invalid. The same anxiety was manifested by 
Bishop Cameron on occasion of a visit to the Sem 
inary in the autumn. .He gave two of the students 
written directions regarding their attendance on the 
infirm Bishop. The latter, hearing of this, asked to 
\ see the paper, and appeared to be pleased with it 
The young men then requested him to name certain 
times in the day when they might go to his room and 
see whether he wanted anything. He did not wish 
them to come to him too often, as long as he could 
walk about. They insisted on the instructions of 






CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



/O/ 



Bishop Cameron, interpreting them as an order to 
visit Bishop Hay five or six times a day. He strongly 
objected to this, saying that Bishop Cameron must 
have forgotten that he had only to touch the bell for 
the maid-servant when he wanted anything. The 
students then dropped the subject, lest they should 
annoy the Bishop, but continued to visit him every 
day about noon, again at four o clock and at seven, 
the master taking tea with him at five. Finally, the 
Bishop limited their visits to one, late in the evening, 
when he desired some good book to be read to him. 
In September of this year (1807) Bishop Hay s 
health had so much improved as to enable him to 
remove to Edinburgh, in compliance with the advice 
of his physician, who considered Aquorties too damp 
a place for an .invalid. Mr. Charles Gordon, of 
Aberdeen, accompanied him on the journey. He 
"residechwith Bishop Cameron in High School Yard, . 
now known as Surgeon s Square, One day he was 
invited to dine with his old friend, Mr. Glendonwyn, 
and his daughters, at Simson s Hotel in Queen street. 
The Bishop accepted the invitation and went to 
dinner attended by a young priest, Mr. Thomson, 
-.who. was afterwards the missionary priest of Ayr. . 
In the course of the dinner the Bishop asked for a*^| 
glass of sherry, and the servant, by mistake, gave ~ 
him a glass of brandy. He had nearly swallowed the 






.758 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



contents of the glass before he discovered his mistake. 

Mr. Thomson laughed aloud. The Bishop rebuked 

ihim severely, as he deserved, for his want of manners. 

Bishop Hay, throughout his long career, could 
never be induced to sit for his portrait. He was 
now at last prevailed on, chiefly through the influence 
of the daughter of his late highly esteemed friend, 
Dr. Wood. This portrait, by Watson, is perhaps 
the best that has been preserved. It has been fre 
quently engraved, and sometimes copied. There is 
another at the Scotch College of Rome, which was 
taken on occasion of his visit to the Papal City in 
1782, when he was in full health. 

The Bishop was much better for spending the 
winter in Edinburgh. In the first week of April he 
set out on his return journey to the Seminary, accom 
panied by the Reverend William Reid, of Stobhall, 
and later, of Dumfries, where he ended his long 
career. On reaching Aberdeen the Bishop felt a 
good deal -exhausted, out he was so far restored by 
his night s rest as to be quite able to continue his 
- : journey to Aquorties the following day. On his 
arrival he gave the students a -whole play-day in 
compliment to his travelling companion. This fact 
is noticeable as up to that time he had never done 
so much. It speaks also for the kindly manners of 
the late Mr. Reid, who had completely gained his 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



759 



good will. Notwithstanding, it occurred to him that 
the latter was taking care of him, as indeed he was ; 
and he asked him why he was going North. Mr, 
Reid replied that he was going, in compliance with 
Bishop Cameron s request, to see how the farm at 
Aquorties looked. The Bishop was satisfied. But 
he remarked that if Mr. Reid had been going on 
his (the Bishop s) account he could have gone quite 
as well by himself. 

There were now indications of that mental infirmity 
which continued till the final change. He found it 
difficult to understand why the hour hand of a watch 
did not go as fast as the minute hand. A few days 
earlier he mistook the evening for the morning, and 
instead of going to supper, went to the chapel with 
his stole on, waiting for Mass and Communion. __ He 
-was able, notwithstanding, to compose a letter ; and 
he dictated ( a long one to Mrs. O Donnell and her 
husband, expressing his gratitude to them for their 
Idnd attention to him during his recent visit to Edin 
burgh, and assuring them that they had his warmest 
prayers for their welfare and prosperity. 

The number of students at the Seminary was in- 

--^.j-i 

creased this year by the addition of those young men 
who had escaped from Valladolid under the guidance 
of Mr. Wallace. They resumed their studies, and 
dieir master was appointed to the charge of a class. 









760 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



Bishop Hay was able to communicate all this to- 
Bishop Cameron. Observing notice in the Edin 
burgh Advertiser of the opening of a new church in 
Paisley, he made haste to assure Bishop Cameron 
that every one in the Seminary " was elated with joy 
on hearing of his success " on the occasion. From 
this time (1810) the progress of the Bishop s infirm 
ities was painfully rapid. H is bodily strength appear 
ed to increase as his once powerful intellect declined. 
This was shown by a walk he undertook one day to- 
Inverurie, where he remained all night at the inn. 
Next day it was found necessary to have recourse to- 
a stratagem in order to bring him home. He was 
placed in a postchaise, ostensibly for going to Edin 
burgh. Finally it became necessary to employ force 
in order to prevent him from straying from home, 
In April, 181 1, he was seized with an alarming illness- 
m the night. It appeared so dangerous that Extreme 
Unction was administered. He rallied, however,, 
before morning and continued to improve, But the 
torpidity in his countenance and the stupidity of ex- , 
pression were permanently increased. He passed 
the summer in the state of health now usual to him; , 
but his mental powers were gone. Although now 
rapidly failing in strength, he was able to walk about 
a little, until the day before the last. In the after 
noon of the 1 4th of October he was put to bed, and 






CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



761 



remained totally unconscious till the end. Next day 
in the afternoon he was anointed by Mr. fames 
Sharp. Life was ebbing away, surely but peacefully, 
and the great Bishop expired without a struggle at a 
quarter to six in the evening. 

This was a sad year in the annals of the Catholics 
of Scotland. Bishop Hay ended his extraordinarily 
bright career in the dismal gloom of mental obscura 
tion ; Mr. C. Maxwell was torn by death from the 
flock that he had served so well ; and the mission 
was deprived forever of the support and invaluable 
services of the patriotic Cardinal Erskine, who died" 
at Paris. 

On the 2 ist of October took place the funeral of 
Bishop Hay. It was conducted in the most simple 
manner. The company walked from the College to the 
Cemetery. The Protestant community was well repre 
sented By Sir Alex. Grant, of Monymusk, Mr. Gordon/; 
of Manar, and Mr. Harvey of Braco, together with the 
Ministers of Inverurie and of the Chapel of Garicch. 
There must also be mentioned the presence of Mr. ; 
, Menzies, of Pitfodels, a chief friend and admirer of 
the deceased Bishop, and the Rev. John Reid. The 
.students, attired in mourning, walked in procession to 
the place of interment ; and when all was over, the^ 
company dined at the Seminary, Mr. Menzies occupy 
ing the chair. The place of burial selected was an . 






762 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



ancient cemetery picturesquely situated within the 
park of Fetternear house, on a steep bank round 
which flows the River Don. Within the enclosure 
set apart for deceased members of the Leslie family 
were laid the remains of the departed Bishop. A 
Chapel has since been erected there ; and in the south 
transept is enclosed the grave of Bishop Hay. 
The eminent Bishop, who did so much by his 
indefatigable labours to restore the Catholic religion 
in Scotland, needs no panegyric. It may not be 
out of place, however, to quote the words of two 
venerable priests, which were written in reply to the 
circular letter announcing the Bishop s death. The 
Rev. Mr. Rattray says : " The venerable Bishop 
Hay has gone to receive the reward of his long and 
faithful labours in the vineyard of Christ. He cer 
tainly proved by his learning and his bright example 
of all virtues, while among us, a most signal .blessing . 
to that vineyard ; and now, we have every reason to 
believe, he is where he can and where he will 
still render it service; for his soul was holy, and " 
most zealous for the divine honour." The Rev. James 
Carruthers, a meritorious historian, expresses similar 
sentiments, although in fewer words : " The exit of 
our most worthy and ever- to- be revered Father, 
Bishop Hay, although with good reason it has 
awakened the most lively feelings, was certainly a 










CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



desirable event. The purification, I trust, was com 
pleted, and the veil dropped to afford easy access to 
the sanctuary. Yet the tribute we pay is exacted by 
gratitude and justice." 




CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



. 

. *jH 



CAP. LXII. 

BIRTH OF BISHOP CAMERON IN HIGH FAVOUR AT 
ROME VERY SUCCESSFUL STUDIES HIS PATRIOT 
ISMHIS FIRST MISSION, STRATHDOWN IN I 780 

PRINCIPAL AT VALLADOLID HIGHLY ESTEEMED 

IN 1798 CONSECRATED BISHOP AT MADRID 

SEVERAL YEARS IN SPAIN OFFICIATING AS BISHOP 

OF VALLADOLID COMMISSION FROM COURT OF 

SPAIN REGARDING THE IRISH COLLEGE OF SALA 
MANCA EVERYTHING SETTLED TO THE SATIS 
FACTION OF ALL PARTIES URGED BY THE COURT 

OF MADRID TO REMAIN AS A BISHOP IN SPAIN 

RETURNS TO SCOTLAND AT ONCE VICAR-APOSTOLIC 

OF THE LOWLAND DISTRICT RESIDES AT EDIN 
BURGH RESULTS OF HIS LABOURS AND HIS 

PREACHING GREAT ABILITY, EXTENSIVE LEARNING 

AND REFINED MANNERS PUTS AN END TO A BANK 

PANIC BUILDS. ST. MARY*S CHURCH SITE MOST 

JUDICIOUSLY CHOSEN FOSTERS THE SEMINARY OF 1 

AQUORTIES REV. ALEX. PATERSON, COADJUTOR 

ON OCCASION OF THAT " CAUSE CELEBRE," SCOTT 

vs. M GAVIN, BISHOP CAMERON HONOURED BY THE 

JUDGES OF THE LAND IN 1825 STRUCK WITH 

APOPLEXY IN 1828 ILL AGAIN IN FEBRUARY OF 

THE SAME YEAR, A CALM AND PEACEFUL DEATH 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



765 









ENDED HIS BRIGHT CAREER BIS HOP /ENEAS 
CHISHOLM COADJUTOR IN THE HIGHLANDS- 
SUCCEEDS HIS BROTHER AS VICAR APOSTOLIC- 
DIED JULY 3 1ST l8l8. 

BISHOP CAMERON. 

Auchindryne in Braemar, Aberdeenshire, was the 
birthplace of this distinguished Bishop. July 28th, 
1747, was the date of his bifth. His earlier studies 
were at Scalan ; and philosophy and theology he 
studied at Rome. He enjoyed great favour in the 
Papal City not only on account of his great abilities, 
but also through the influence of Cardinal York. 
His parentage recommended him to. this eminent 
member of the exiled Royal Family. In 1715 his 
father held a commission in the army that was raised 

J 

in the interest of the Cardinal s banished father ; and 
in 1745, although unable to take the field himself, he 
sent two substitutes to serve in the army of Prince 

;.<>* S v .-.,,- 

Charles. Mr. Cameron remained eight years at;. 
Rome, pursuing the higher branches of ecclesiastical , 
stddy. He was eminently successful ; more so thaix. 

1 : iV- 

all his class fellows. It is not, therefore, surprising 
that he won the first prizes, and that the Jesuits, 
who directed his studies, did all in their power to 
induce him to join their Society. Notwithstanding 
the length of time he was at Rome, he was only at 
the second year of his theology when the scarcity of 



766 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



missionary priests in Scotland required that he should 
be ordained and undertake duty in his native land. 
He was, accordingly, raised to the priesthood on the 
2nd February, 1772, when he returned to Scotland 
and was appointed to the mission of Strathavon. 
There he laboured with great acceptance, gaining 
the good will and esteem of all, Protestants as well 
as Catholics, till 1 780, when he was nominated Prin 
cipal of the Scotch College at Valladolid by his pre 
decessor in the Episcopacy, Bishop Hay. There, as 
in Rome, his superior talents and friendly manners 
won for him many friends, among whom were the 
chief characters of the ancient and still important 
city. Valladolid was then, and it is to-day, the Capital 
of old Castile. It is also the seat of an ancient and 
renowned University, of a Court of Chancery, and 
of a Bishop s See. 

There likewise is the residence of the Captain- 
General of the Province, The opinion and advice 
of the Scotch rector were often sought and -followed 
in affairs of public importance. On his arrival in. 
Spain he knew not a word of the language of that 
country ; but, under this disadvantage, his ability 
once more served him well ; and he not only learned 
the Spanish tongue, but also acquired a thoroughly" 
correct pronunciation, so that Spaniards themselves 
could not from his speech, discover that he was a 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



767 






foreigner.- The business of the College required that 
he should repair to Madrid. He was introduced there 
to the leading men at Court, and was by them cor 
dially received, especially by Count Compamanes, 
Governor of the Council of Castile, who ever after 
wards treated him with marked attention. In 1797, 
when the increasing infirmities of Bishop Geddes 
rendered him unable any longer to exercise his 
episcopal duties, Bishop Hay proposed Mr. Cameron 
to fill his place as coadjutor. Briefs appointing him 
to this office, with the title of Bishop of Maximiano- 
popolis, were received on the i9th September of the 
year mentioned, and on 28th October, 1798, he was 
consecrated at Madrid. He remained in Spain for 
some years after his consecration ; and, in com 
pliance with the request of the aged and infirm 
Bishop of Valladolid, he performed, during the 
.period of~his stay, the whole episcopal duty of that 
diocese. While so acting he was commissioned by 
.the Spanish Court to inquire into and settle very 
serious differences that had arisen between the rector 
and students of the Irish College in Salamanca. 
This commission he executed with consummate pru 
dence .and ability. After a patient investigation, he 
arranged everything to the complete satisfaction of . 
the Court, of the rector, Dr. Curtis, Archbishop of 
Armagh, and of the students, many of whom after- 















;68 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



wards signalized their zeal in the land of their nativity. 
In 1802, Mr. Cameron, although urged by the Court 
of Madrid to remain in Spain, returned to Scotland. 
The whole charge of the Lowland district at once 
fell to his share, Bishop Hay s infirmities obliging 
him to resign the office of Vicar-Apostolic. It is not 
surprising that in the midst of the troubles which 
v surrounded him, he was wont to consider the years 
that he had passed in Spain as the happiest of his 
life, and that he often expressed his intention to return 
to that Catholic country and end his days in the 
Scotch College. He appeared, however, to have 
given up this idea some time before his death. He 
was frequently spoken of at Valladolid, and always 
in terms of well-deserved praise. 

His residence was now at Edinburgh ; and the 
Catholics of that capital and the country generally 
may well claim to date a new era from the day that 
he first>appeared amongst them as their Bishop. He 
had indeed entered on a new and very different field 
from that in which he had hitherto been called upon 
to act. There was no longer for him the Catholic 
nation and the friendly court. A cloud of hostile 
prejudice overhung his native land. The people, 
still untaught by all the experience they had passed 
through, cherished their ancient hatred of the 
Catholic faith. So great an evil, the enlightened 









CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 769 

Bishop was persuaded, could only be lessened, if 
not wholly remedied, by returning, not evil for eviT, ;i 

but, on the contrary, good for evil. To this task 
the wise pastor applied all his energy. Highly gifted 
as a preacher, he was indefatigable in spreading 
instruction. Such efforts were, in a great measure, 
confined to his parishioners. But through them, and 
by means of occasional attendance on the part of 
less bigoted Protestants, his preaching was so far 
effectual and light was made to shine in dark places. 
His personal demeanour was even more powerful thart 
his eloquence. It conciliated for him good will in Scot 
land as it had done in Spain. Respect and admiration 
increased as his career wore on.. His great ability, 
extensive learning . and refined manners, brought 
him into relation with the higher circles of society and 
won their esteem, whilst, by rendering himself access 
ible to all, and by kindly dealing with them, he be 
came a favourite with the more humble classes. The 
writer has heard the late Rev. Alex. Badenoch relate S^ 
a circumstance which shows how popular the Bishop 
had become at Edinburgh. There was a panic at 
the bank of his friend, Sir William Forbes. Hearing 
of it, he gathered up whatever money he could find 
about the house, and hastened to the bank. Butcui - 
bono ? The dense crowd of panic-struck depositors 
rendered all approach impossible. He succeeded 



770 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 






- 

. 



in getting some one to listen to him. This person, 
on hearing that he was going to bank a few hundred 
pounds, told his next neighbours ; and so it spread 
among the eager crowd. A way was made and it 

was seen by all that it was no other than Bishop 

i> 

Cameron who was going to place money in the bank. 
So prudent a man could not trust his money to a 
ruined bank. So thought the people ; and the panic 
was at an end. 

At the time of Bishop Cameron s accession to 
office, the numbers and importance of the Catholic 
people had greatly outgrown their church accommo 
dation. The churches, or chapels as they were 
called, were almost all of a very humble kind and 
not- sufficiently large to accommodate the congrega 
tions that resorted to them. This was a serious 
hindrance to the growth and even the maintenance 
of religion. The Bishop laboured assiduously and 
( : with all the energy of his powerful mind to remedy 

this evil ; and his success was all that could be . ex-, 

i F &t^ * v-;* . -- ; . 

pected at the time at which he lived. The Church 

of St. Mary; Edinburgh, at present in use as the 
Cathedral of the Archdiocese of St. Andrews and 
Edinburgh in the restored hierarchy, shows with 
Igment, good taste and perseverance he 
proceeded. The site for this church was admirably 
chosen near the fashionable dwellings of Picardy Place 









.- 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



771 



and York Place, the great highway from Edinburgh 
to the Port of Leith and the important thorough 
fare of Broughton Street. All this, notwithstand 
ing, the Church was capable of being -concealed. It 
was placed fronting Broughton Street, but so- 
far back from it as to admit of a row of dwell 
ing houses between it and the thoroughfare, in 
case of hostility arising. No such hostility as 
would have required this precaution ever occurred ; 
and the open ground in front, itself an ornament, 
allows the handsome fagade to be seen. The Bishop,, 
anxious that the church should be in keeping with, 
the improved architecture of the modern capital, had. 
recourse to the services of an architect of known 
ability and taste, Mr. Gillespie Graham, than whom; 
none was more thought of at the time. This accounts- 
for the really church-like appearance of the edifice,, 
of which-it is not too much to say- that it was an 
auspicious beginning of the still more ecclesiastical , 
architecture that came into vogue througfr the genius 
and enthusiasm of Mr. Puein. 

.s " :- - ""v ."Vs* - ? EvQ*>-*" ~ 

Next to providing suitable churches, came the careVl 
of finding priests to minister in them. This care 
was not neglected by Bishop Cameron. In pursu 
ance of it he paid the greatest attention to the 
Seminary of Aquorties. When the charge of that 
institution was laid upon him, as coadjutor, by his 



V." ,-^ V ..>. 








772 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



predecessor, who founded it in 1799. the latter 
earnestly besought him to watch over its interests. 
This admonition Bishop Cameron never lost sight of. 
He was wont to say that " Aquorties was the apple 
of his eye," and his conduct in regard to it clearly 
showed that he spoke sincerely. He took care that 
the Seminary should have pious and learned profes 
sors ; he furnished the library at great cost with the 
most useful and approved works, both ancient and 
modern ; he gave special attention to the comfort ot 
the students, and he laid out large sums of money 
in improving the farm. At last, when he resolved 
on resigning the charge of the district to a coadjutor, 
the idea of giving up the superintendence of Aquor 
ties appeared to cost him more than anything else, so 
great was his solicitude for its welfare. 

In 1815, desiring to have a coadjutor, he person 
ally consulted each of the priests as to who should 
be chosen, and their choice, as well as his own^ fall 
ing on the Rev. Alexander Paterson, at that tihie 
the priest of Paisley, this most worthy clergyman was 
nominated coadjutor and consecrated Bishop by 
Bishop Cameron the following year. 

On occasion of the case, Scott vs. McGavin, it was 
shown how little Bishop Cameron trusted to the 
better feeling of the populace of large towns, and this 
was as late as the year 1821. Mr. Scott came to 






& 

i 
"SI 

" ."; j 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



773 



Edinburgh in order to consult the Bishop as to the 
expediency of prosecuting the man who had grossly 
calumniated him in a periodical of which the libeller 
.was editor. The Bishop was opposed to prosecution 
on the ground that there was too much bigotry at 
Glasgow to find a jury that would convict, however 
clear the evidence. Mr. Scott represented that if he 
did not prosecute, he could not remain in Glasgow ; 
and if a verdict could not be obtained, no worse con 
sequence would ensue. Although the Bishop could 
not approve of bringing an action against the libeller, 
he did not forbid it to be done ; and Mr. Scott pro 
ceeded with the case. Bigotry, notwithstanding, there 
existed, as there always does exist in the minds of 
the Scotch people, a sense of justice ; and the Jury 
unanimously found a verdict of guilty against the". 1 - 
libeller. At the trial Bishop Cameron was examined 
as a witness. His evidence being concluded, Lord 
"Vv, Gillies, the presiding Judge, invited the Bishop, if 
he wished to remain in Court, to take a seat on the 
Bench. This was a compliment a mark of honpur 
for which the excellent Bishop was not prepared. 
He was not, however, such a tyro in the ways of 
mankind as not to accept the learned Judge s polite 
ness. There were extreme people in the Court of 
the calumniating editor s persuasion, who are said to 
have been horror-struck. The celebrated Lord 









774 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



Jeffrey was counsel for Mr. Scott ; and "distinguished 
himself by a singularly able speech. 

In the closing years of his episcopal career Bishop 
Cameron was greatly impeded in the exercise of his 
sacred duties by serious illness. In 1825 he was 
seized with apoplexy. Few survive such attacks ; 
and in his case it nearly proved fatal. Contrary to 
all expectation, however, he was soon convalescent ; 
and had so far recovered from the effects of the 
shock, both as regarded his physical strength and 
mental power, as to be able to interest himself, as 
was his wont, in the general affairs of the Vicariate, 
promoting with all his energy its welfare and pros 
perity. Three years later the end was seen to 
approach. On the 29th of January, 1828, he caught 
cold, as was supposed, and nothing worse was appre 
hended. But, on the following day, his physician, 
...Dr. Ross, who thoroughly understood his constitution, 
^declared him to be in imminent danger. He was 
"better and worse alternately, for another month. ; 
But on the 7th February the great change unmis 
takably approached, ana shortly before midnight of 
chat date, he departed this life in peace, and to all 
appearance, with little or no painful struggle. He 
-was surrounded till the last by faithful friends, and 
-enjoyed all the. consolation that religion could im 
part. His place of interment was under the Gospel 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



775 



end of the altar of St. Mary s Church, now the pro- 
Cathedral of the Archdiocese of St. Andrew s and 

ft 

Edinburgh. It is noteworthy, as indicating an im 
proved state of popular sehtiment, that the funeral 
was conducted publicly according to the rites of the 
Church. It was the first time that such a service, 
with the appropriate ceremonial, had been performed 
in Scotland since the " Reformation." 

^Eneas Chisholm was a native of Strathglass, 
Inverness-shire. Having completed his studies at 
Valladolid, he was ordained there in the year 1783. 
In May, 1785, he became one of the masters of that 
College ; and from thence he was transferred, in 1 786, 
to the College of Douai, where he filled the office of 
Prefect of Studies till the autumn of 1789, when he 
came to the mission of Scotland and was stationed in 
Strathglass. On the first of August, 1803, a postula- 
tion was despatched to Rome, praying that he should 
be appointed coadjutor to his brother, Bishop Jphn 
Chisholm. In compliance with this request, Briefs 
nominating him Bishop of Diocesarea and coadjutor. 
Vicar- Apostolic of the Highland district were ex 
pedited on the 1 9th of May, 1804. The scarcity of 
priests, however, rendered it necessary that he should 
do duty as a missionary till the i5th September, 
1805, when he was consecrated by Bishop Cameron 
at Lismore. In 1814 he succeeded his brother as 









CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



Vicar- Apostolic. His pontificate was not of long" 
duration. There was hardly time to appreciate, as 
they deserved, his zeal and apostolic labours, when he 
died at Lismore on the 3ist of July, 1818. He was- 
buried with appropriate funeral honours in the Island 
Cemetery. 




CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



777 



CAP. LXIII. 

BIRTH OF BISHOP PATERSON SUB-PRINCIPAL OF HIS 

COLLEGE BEFORE HIS STUDIES WERE FINISHED 

HIS FIRST MISSION, TOMB^ IN GREAT HONOUR 

THERE DEVOTED TO THE POOR FOUR YEARS 

LABOUR AT PAISLEY COADJUTOR CONSECRATED 

AT PAISLEY DEPUTED TO RECOVER THE SCOTCH 

PROPERTIES IN FRANCE HIS SKILL IN NEGOTIA 
TION FINALLY PREVAILS RECOVERS ALSO FOR 

THE IRISH COLLEGE TRANSFERS THE TWO COL 
LEGES TO BLAIRS SUCCESS OF BLAIRS THREE- 
DISTRICTS IN PLACE OF TWO BISHOP PATERSON 

RETAINS THE EASTERN DISTRICT, WITH RESI 
DENCE AT EDINBURGH IN 1828 SUCCEEDS BISHOP 

CAMERON THE SAME YEAR CONSECRATES REV, 

ANDREW SCOTT RECOVERS THE FUNDS IN FRANCE^ 

... /-OF THE SCOTCH MISSION PROMOTES EDUCATION 

^j/ "CATHOLIC EMANCIPATION "DEATH OF BISHOP 

PATERSON THE EX-KING AND ROYAL FAMILY OFj 

FRANCE, CARDINAL LATIL, BISHOPS SCOTT AND; 
KYLE, TOGETHER WITH OTHER DISTINGUISHED 

ECCLESIASTICS, ATTEND HIS PUNERAL APOSTOLIC. 

CHARACTER OF DECEASED BISHOP BISHOP RONALD 

. M DONALD SUCCESS OF HIS EARLY STUDIES 
SUCCEEDS BISHOP AENEAS CHISHOLM HIS ACCOM 
PLISHMENTS RELIC OF IONA IONA. 



77 8 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



BISHOP PATERSON 

Was one of those distinguished ecclesiastics whom 
the mission owed to the Catholic Enzie. He was 
born at Pathhead, in that country, in March, 1766. 
In his youth he spent a year of study at the Seminary 
of Scalan. At the age of thirteen he entered the 
College at Douai, and remained there till that house 
was broken up by the outbreak of the French Revolu 
tion in 1 793. The great ability of which Mr. Paterson 
gave proof and the unexceptionable conduct which 
graced his early years won for him the favour of his 
seniors; and he was appointed sub-Principal of the 
College before he reached the end of the time usually 
allotted to study. On returning to Scotland he was 
stationed at Tombac, Banffshire, and remained there 
till 1812. In the remote district which became the 
scene of his labours, he was looked upon as nothing 
^less than an oracle, by the Protestant as well as the 
Catholic community. More than this, he ever showed 
himself the friend and protector of the poor. In this 
/relation he was powerful, and accomplished much 
"good, having great influence with the Duke of Gordon 
and other local proprietors. Paisley, where missionary 
duty was onerous in the extreme, was his next mission. 
He had been there only four years when he was nomi 
nated Bishop of Cybistra and coadjutor, with right 
of succession to Bishop Cameron. The consecration 



- 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



779 









took place at Paisley. The French Revolutionists, 
not satisfied with breaking up the Scotch Colleges 
at Paris and Douai, seized and confiscated all the 
properties connected with them. It was hoped that 
under the rule of a more regular government 
those properties might, in a great measure, be re 
covered. Here was a field for the diplomatic ability 
of the learned Bishop. In the year 1821, accord 
ingly, he repaired to Paris and commenced the 
difficult work of negotiation. He was vigourously 
opposed by a board consisting of both French and 
Irish members. But with all their ingenuity and 
cunning contrivances, they were no match for the skill 
and diplomatic power of the Bishop. They were 
completely baffled ; and the greatest success possible 
in the circumstances was achieved on behalf of the 
mission. All the confiscated property of the Scotch 
Colleges in France that had not been sold under 
Revolutionary Governments was recovered. .On the 
: same occasion the Bishop bestowed his efforts in re- . 
gaining for the Irish College its confiscated property, 
and with the like success. 

Bishop Paterson conceived the happy idea of 
uniting the two Colleges of the Highlands and the 
Lowlands, in order that there might be one thoroughly 
efficient College. He lost no time in taking measures 
for carrying out this laudable design, and he was 



;8o 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



cordially and ably seconded by the late John Menzies, 
Esquire, of Pitfodels. This Catholic gentleman 
liberally presented the fine estate of Blairs, in Kin- 
cardineshire, six hundred acres in extent,, and 
beautifully situated on the right bank of the river 
Dee, six miles from Aberdeen. The mansion house 
was enlarged and adapted for the purposes of a 
College. There remained only to transfer to it the 
establishments of Lismore and Aquorties. This was 
happily done ; and a Seminary for all Scotland was 
at once in full operation. It was prosperous at its 
commencement ; and it continues to proper. Two 
Bishops and an Archbishop have already sprung from 
fche ranks of its alumni, together with others who 
have won distinction in their ecclesiastical career. 

It is said to be an evil to multiply princes. But 
this saying does not apply to the princes of the 
Church, who are the shepherds of the flock, appointed 
to guard them and lead them into wholesome 
pastures. The more they are multiplied, therefore, 
the better are the sheep of the fold protected and 
sustained by the salutary food of sound doctrine. 
Such considerations as well as the actual necessities 
of the mission called for the presence in Scotland of 
a third Bishop. With this end in view, the country 
was divided into three missionary districts. These 
divisions were termed, respectively, the Eastern, 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 781 

Western and Northern Vicariates Apostolic. In 
1826 the Bishop visited Rome in order to obtain 
Papal sanction for this arrangement and the appoint 
ment of a Bishop. In February, 1828, he succeeded 
the deceased Bishop Cameron as Vicar-Apostolic of 
the Lowland district. In September of the same 
year he consecrated the Rev. Andrew Scott, who be 
came Vicar- Apostolic of the Western district in 
succession to Bishop McDonald, the Rev. James 
Kyle appointed Vicar-Apostolic of the Northern 
district, and reserved for himself the Eastern and not 
least important division of the country. On occasion 
of his visit to Rome he was appointed a domestic 
chaplain to His Holiness the Pope. 

The French revolution of 1830 caused the students 
of the Scotch mission who were pursuing their 
studies at Paris to return home. Bishop Paterson, 
regardless of personal danger, proceedecl to Paris 
in September of the same year, in order to save 
if it were possible the college .funds belonging to, 

* " A 

the Scotch mission from alienation. His success 

%-* ^ % ->;" -J .* * . - < * : ^-"-- --*. * : 

was great, beyond all expectation ; so much so that 
he obtained from the existing- Government the same 
management of the funds in question that he had 
exercised under the reign of Charles X. In conse 
quence of this arrangement the students were enabled ^ 
to return to Paris and recommence their studies. 






. _.- 






9*t - -V- *f- - <; - , r . * " " *-V J " / * : 

& - . 



782 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



. 



; During the last three years of his life the Bishop 
resided chiefly at Edinburgh. Notwithstanding the 
various occupations that necessarily claimed his time, 
he was able to keep the Church in good repair and 
even add to its decorations. The cause of education 
had its due share of attention. None understood 
better how advantageous sound education was to the 
Catholics of his charge and the rising Church of his 
country. At the period of his untimely death he 
was engaged in devising measures for the improve 
ment of the Catholic schools and establishing them 
in a state of greater efficiency and respectability. 

The final deliverance of the Catholics of the United 
Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland from almost 
all the remaining legal disabilities took place during 
the pontificate of Bishop Paterson. The " Catholic 
Emancipation Bill," as it was called, passed through 
both Houses of Parliament and received the Royal 

Assent, after having surmounted all the difficulties 
that were thrown in its ; way, by the still existing 
bigotry of the country. It was at last conceded to- 
the fears, rather than granted by the liberality and 
good will of Parliament. The words of the Duke of 
Wellington leave no doubt as to this unpleasant 

V historical fact. In moving the second reading of the 

bill, in the House of Lords, the Duke of Wellington 

said: "My Lords, I am one of those who have 









CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



783 






probably passed a longer period of my life engaged 
in war than most men, and principally, I may say, in 
civil war ; and I must say this, that if I could avoid 
by any sacrifice whatever, even one month of . 
civil war in the country to which I am attached, 
I would sacrifice my life in order to do it. I say 
there is nothing that destroys property and pros 
perity and demoralizes character to the degree that 
civil war does ; by it the hand of man is raised 
against his neighbour, against his brother and against 
his father; the servant betrays his master, and the 
whole scene ends in confusion and devastation. Yet, 
my lords, this is the resource to which we must have 
looked, these are the means to which we must have 
applied in order to have put an end to this state of 
things if we had not made the option of bringing for 
ward the measures for which I hold myself respon- 
-sible."_ The eminent statesman, Sir Robert Peel, in ... 
his memoirs, corroborates the testimony .of the im 
mortal Wellington : "-I. can with truth affirm, as I| 
do solemnly affirm in the presence of Almighty God, 
to whom all hearts be open, all desires known, and 
from whom no secrets are hid, that in advising and 
promoting the measures of 1829, I was swayed by 
no fear except the fear of public calamity, and that I 
acted throughout on a deep conviction that those 
measures were not only conducive to the general 










. 



784 CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 

welfare but that they had become imperatively 
necessary in order to avert from interests which had 
.a special claim upon my support, the interests of the 
Church and of institutions connected with the 
Church an imminent and increasing danger." 

The great change, with its accompanying circum 
stances, must now be recorded. On Friday, 28th 
October, 1831, Bishop Paterson left Edinburgh for 
Dundee, in order to conduct the services in the latter 
city on occasion of a contribution being raised to 
wards the funds of the Infirmary of that place. On 
the following Sunday the Bishop celebrated and 
preached after Mass. The Church was crowded, 
many respectable Protestants being present. The 
Bishop s dignified appearance in his gorgeous 
episcopal robes, together with his earnest words, pro 
duced a most favourable impression. His text was 
from that passage of the prophet psalmist ; "Blessed 
is lie who considereth the poor; the Lord will deliver 
him in time of trouble" He made a powerful appeal 

to the feeling of his audience in favour of the excellent 

. 

Institution in behalf of which he was preaching. 
Speaking of the liberality which distinguished the 
management of this Institution, he said : "Thanks 
tb the liberal enactments of our Legislature the day 
has now gone by when it was enquired of our suffer 
ing fellow-brethren, whether they were Protestant or 






; 






< 









CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 78 z 

* J 

Catholic." In another part of his sermon, as if an 
ticipating what was so soon to happen, he said : "Let 
not your hearts be deluded by the love of that 
wealth which perisheth, let not your eyes be dazzled 
by the glittering of gold or silver. All these shall 
soon pass avvay. You and I shall soon have to 
appear before the tribunal of the Sovereign Judge 
to give an account of the use which we have 
made of the mammon of this world ; and nothing 
shall remain except what we shall have employed 
in relieving the miseries of the distressed." To-- 
" wards the close of his discourse, which was about 
three-quarters of an hour in length, his voice began to 
falter. Nevertheless, he was able to conclude with 
a glowing eulogium of the Infirmary, and insisted on 
the necessity of contributing towards the relief and 
comfort of those, who, though now laid on a bed of 
sickness, had perhaps seen better days, tfe with 
drew from the pulpit a little after one o clock. On 
entering the vestry, he complained of a .violent pain- 
in his head, and a few moments later he exclaimed : ; 
"0 God, lam dying I O God, have mercy on my souT" 
In five minutes more, he was speechless. -A. physi 
cian was speedily called, who bled him profusely; 
but the bleeding gave him no relief. The Sacra 
ments of the dying were then administered ; and at 
twenty minutes past four o clock he expired, thus 



ikiAtii.- 

/ 



;86 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



departing to his reward, whilst humanely and charit 
ably labouring to promote the relief of the poor and 
afflicted. 

In compliance with the wish of the deceased 
Bishop s friends, his remains were conveyed to 
Edinburgh, with the purpose of being laid at rest in 
his own church. An apartment of the Episcopal 
residence was appropriately prepared ; and there, 
according to the rites of the Church, the body lay 
for some time, arrayed in pontifical robes with mitre, 
cross, ring and crosier. Among the numbers who 
came to pay a last tribute of respect to the departed 
were the ex-King, Charles X., and the Royal Family 
of France. The funeral service was performed in St, 
Mary s Church ; and so great was the desire to be 
present that it was found necessary to issue tickets 
of admission. His Eminence Cardinal Latil and the 
Right Jlev. Bishops Scott and Kyle participated in 
the solemn obsequies. The Rev. William Reid, 
assisted by the Rev. John Murdoch, afterwards Bishop 
in the West, and the. Rev. James McKay, who died 
lately at a very advanced age, celebrated the Mass:, 
of Requiem. The Rev. Alex. Badenoch, with the 
fine feeling for which he was remarkable, delivered 
.an appropriate funeral discourse ; and when all the 
ceremonies prescribed by the Ritual were concluded. 



, 




. 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



787 



the body was reverently consigned to its final resting 
place. 

It is but justice to Bishop Paterson to say that he 
assiduously employed his abilities, which were of a. 
high, if not perhaps of the very highest order, in- 
promoting the good of the Church and the welfare 
of his fellow-Catholics. He was of the strictest 
principle, and never swerved from what he believed 
to be true and just. He generally formed his reso- 
, lutions with exquisite judgment and carried them 
out, not unfrequently in the face of formidable oppose 
tion, with unflinching firmness. His negotiations in 
regard to the Scotch property in France, which 
.proved so successful, showed that he was possessed 
in no small degree of diplomatic skill. At home the 
simplicity of his life, his kindly manners and truly { 
.apostolic character, gave him an influence which, 
nothing could resist. He was an enemy to contro 
versial disputation, which seldom results in convic 
tion, but, on the contrary, widens the breaches^ * 
already unhappily existing between Christians. Such 
discussions ( are scarcely* ever conducted with that 
coolness and regard to charity, which alone could 
render them useful and instructive. Hence, the ven 
erable Bishop believed that they militated against that 
mutual forbearance and good-will among all classes- 
and denominations which he constantly preached.. 


















ij. .- 



y88 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 






RANALD M DONALD, (1820-1832). 
This Prelate, although born at Edinburgh, was of 
Highland parentage. In very early life he was sent to 
the Scotch College of Douai. H e there passed through 
the usual course of study in a most creditable manner, 
becoming an excellent classical scholar. As soon as 
his studies were completed he was ordained priest 
and returned to his native country. From this time 
(1782), till he was raised to Episcopal dignity in 
1820, he ceased not to discharge with exemplary zeal 
and more than ordinary ability the onerous duties of 
a missionary apostolic. His first station was in 
Glengairn, Aberdeenshire, where he laboured for a 
few years and was thence transferred to Glengarry. 
His next mission was in the Island of Uist, where 
there was a numerous and scattered congregation. 

On the demise of Bishop ^neas Chisholm he was 

% 
nominated Bishop of Aeryndela and Vicar- Apostolic 

of the Highland district. The Briefs appointing 

i . *. - . ;> >i "* : t .>*> ;* j" ^ J fr, t " - 

him were issued in autumn, 1819, and he was con 
secrated Bishop by Bishop Paterson at Edinburgh 
towards the end of February, 1820. During his 
Episcopate he led a very secluded life ; but never lost 
that grace of manner which distinguishes the Chris 
tian gentleman. p Although remote from what is 
called Society, he possessed more true refinement than 
many of those who spend their lives in the highest 






O- , . .-,. . ~* r ./ 





CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



789 














circles. His attainments as a scholar were of the high 
est order; and, even in his old age, he could write and 
speak Latin with the utmost facility, purity and eleg 
ance. It was due to his literary acquirements that 
he was frequently called upon to act as secretary 
at the meetings of the clergy. Although it adds 
nothing to the merit of the accomplished Bishop, it 
is, nevertheless, illustrative of his time that he 
possessed a relic of lona lona, that was so long 
the abode of the Apostolic Saint Columba, and 
whence he so often went forth to preach the Gospel 
to the barbarian Picts ; lona, that for centuries 
spread the light of religion, like a glory, over the 
surrounding lands ; lona, where for many genera 
tions were sepulchred the Kings of Scotland, and 
where lesser potentates, the Kings of the Isles, were 
often laid at rest with all the honours usually done 
to royalty ; lona, that, impervious to. time and war, 
survived the depredations of the heathen Dane ; 
-lona, the very thought of which and its holy associ 
ations so moved the critical mind of Doctor Johnson 
that he exclaimed : " That man is little to be envied 
whose devotion would not grow warmer amid the 
ruins of lona ! " lona, the odour of whose centuries 
of excellence still hangs around its ruined walls "; 
lona, a place of pilgrimage, to which repair devout : 
Catholics in order to offer up their prayers and renew ; 














... - .... 



790 

their fervour at the fallen temple and the broken 
shrine ; lona, the scattered stones of which, as if 
endowed with the eloquence of Columba, proclaim 
aloud the long discarded truth to an unbelieving 
nation. 









CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 







CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



791 



CAP. LXIV. 

GLENGARRY PRESENTS TO BISHOP M DONALD THE ... 

GOLDEN CHALICE OF IONA INTERESTING ACCOUNT . 

AND DESCRIPTION OF THIS ANCIENT RELIC 

BISHOP M DONALD BECOMES VICAR-APOSTOLIC OF 

THE WESTERN DISTRICT THE COLLEGE OF LIS- 

MORE TRANSFERRED TO BLAIRS BISHOP M DONALD 

HIGHLY ESTEEMED BISHOP SCOTT COADJUTOR- 
STUDIED AT SCALAN, DOUAI AND ABERDEEN HIS 

FIRST MISSION, DEECASTLE AFTERWARDS AT 

HUNTLY IN 1805 PASTOR OF THE IMPORTANT 

CONGREGATION OF GLASGOW THE HONOURABLE. 

AND RIGHT REVEREND BISHOP M*DONALD RAPID 

INCREASE OF GLASGOW S CONGREGATION HOSTILE 

PREJUDICES ARDUOUS AND TRYING LABOURS 

MR. SCOTT . RESOLVES TO BUILD A CAPACIOUS 

CHURCH A COMMERCIAL CRISIS IMPEDES .THE . 



WORK THE PERSEVERANCE OF MR. SCOTT FIN- 

.. 

ALLY SUCCESSFUL rTHE NEW CHURCH FREQUEN 
TED BY GREAT AND IMPOSING NUMBERS. 

It was certainly a high privilege to possess a 
relic of lona. It was the good fortune of Bishop 
McDonald to enjoy this privilege. Through the 
favour of his friend, Alexander Ranaldson McDonell 






792 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 









of Glengarry, he became the possessor of a chalice 
of gold which had served ten centuries, it is believed,, 
in the Monastery of lona. It must now be shown 
how the precious relic came into the hands of Glen 
garry. His ancestor, in the time of King Charles 
II., was requested by his neighbour, McLean of 
Dewart, to assist him against some chief with whom 
he was at war. Glengarry, who, at the time, enjoyed 
the title of Lord McDonell and Aros, complied with 
the request, and proceeded, with five hundred of his 
warriors, to the assistance of his friend. On his 
arrival in McLean s country, he was honoured with 
a banquet, at which were used certain pieces of 
church plate, and among the rest, the chalice of 
lona. Glengarry was shocked at this profanation of 
sacred things, and determined to return home, say 
ing that no success could attend the arms of people 
who were s_o profane. McLean, on learning this, 
sent all the plate, as a present and propitiatory offer 
ing to Glengarry, beseeching him to remain and 
bestow his aid. The offended chief was so far pro 
pitiated as to allow his men to stay with McLean, 
but refused to remain himself, and immediately re 
turned home. The chalice was safely held in - the 
Glengarry family till the time of Alexander, already 
mentioned, who presented it to Bishop McDonald. 
A description of thjs remarkable chalice will be 



\ 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



793 






\ 

found in Principal Sir Daniel Wilson s work, " P re- 
Historic Annals of Scotland." A letter quoted in^ 
that work from the late Rev. William Gordon (the 
last head of the Glenbucket family) to the writer of 
these sketches, says that it was of solid gold, and 
evidently of great antiquity, as could be seen upon 
it the marks of the hammer which had beaten it into 
shape. The invaluable relic, associated with which 
were so manyinteresting memories, continued in the 
possession of Bishop Ranald McDonald until the 
end of his days, when it passed to his successor, 
Bishop Scott. 

In 1826, Bishop Paterson had succeeded in obtain 
ing the division of Scotland ecclesiastically into three 
Vicariates, designated as the Eastern, Western and 
Northern Districts. This measure, considering the 
circumstances and state of the missions, had become 
not 6nly ^expedient, but necessary. On occasion of 
,the change, Bishop McDonald became Vicar- Apos- 
,.tolic of the Western district, which comprised a 
considerable portion of the Highlands, which still 
remained under his jurisdiction. Thus, his title was 
changed, and, to a certain extent, the scene of his 
episcopal labours. About the same time he was 
relieved of the care of his Seminary at Lismore, that 
institution becoming united, chiefly through the 
agency of Bishop Paterson, with the College for the 



794 



. . CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



Lowlands, now transferred from Aquorties to .Blairs, 
on the river Dee, near Aberdeen, a property bestowed 
for the purpose by the late John Menzies, of Pitfodels. 
Notwithstanding this partial relief, the labours of the 
Episcopate were so arduous that Bishop McDonald 
found it necessary to have a coadjutor. His choice 
fell on the Rev. Andrew Scott, whose merits were at 
once recognized by the clergy and the authorities at 
Rome. He was accordingly consecrated Bishop and 
entered on his duties as coadjutor Vicar-Apostolic of 
the Western district. Bishop McDonald, meanwhile, 
by his amiability of manner, and his kindness of 
heart, had won the esteem and affection of all, whether 
Catholics or Protestants, who came into relation with 
him. Such were his benevolence and attention to all 
around him that his society was much sought, and 
gave the greatest pleasure. He rejoiced in contri 
buting to render others happy; and he found a 
source of happiness himself in diffusing cheerfulness 
and promoting innocent enjoyment. It is easily con 
ceived, as is .recorded .of him, that he was greatly 
beloved as well as respected by persons of all per 
suasions. Some of the most eminent ministers of 
.the established Kirk of Scotland were of -"the number 
of his personal and devoted friends. Hence, he did 
more by his way of life and conversation, as his 
record bears witness, to do away with religious pre- 









CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



795 



judices and mitigate theological antipathies than 
any other man of his time. Towards the close 
of his life, unfortunately, he became almost totally 
blind. In consequence of this affliction, his coad 
jutor came to be invested with independent authority 
in governing the district. At last came the closing 
scene. The ^venerable Bishop departed this life on 
the 2Oth September, 1832, at Fortwilliam, Inverness- 
shire. The Right Reverend Bishop Scott, assisted 
by several priests of the neighbourhood, paid the 
last funeral honours and laid his remains at rest* 
within the Catholic Church of Fortwilliam. 

ANDREW SCOTT (1828-1846). 

" There is the making of a priest in that little 
fellow." Such were the words, which proved pro- ; 
phetic, concerning Andrew Scott, when only five 
- years of age, spoken iii his father s house by an 
r elderly missionary priest, The intelligent look of 
the " little fellow " elicited this remark ; and it was 
to him as an oracle which "he treasured up in his" 
mind and never forgot. From that moment he 
resolved to be aothing less and nothing else than a : 
priest, whatever impediments might be thrown in 
his way. He was a native of the Catholic Enzie, 
and born at Chapelford, on the 1 3th day of February, 
1772. His application to study in his earlier years 
was attended with remarkable success. In February, 






.->." .": \ - .. i~iVr "-. :v -i ^ 



796 



CATHOLICS OK SCOTLAND. 






1785, he became an alumnus of the Seminary at 
Scalan, and was soon after sent to continue his 
ecclesiastical studies in the Scotch College at Douai. 
He resided there several years, and was distin 
guished no less by proficiency in his studies than 
by piety and edifying conduct. The French Revo 
lution came, and he was obliged, along with his 
fellow students, to return to Scotland. He then 
once . more became an injnate of the only Sem 
inary in Scotland, the unpretending House of Scalan. 
. His course of study for the priesthood was, however, 
completed at Aberdeen, under the guidance of the 
Rev. John Farquarson, formerly Principal of Douai 
College. He was ordained priest in that city by the 
venerable Bishop Hay, on the 25th day of March, 
1795- 

The missionary labours of Andrew , Scott, which 
were destined to be so important, had a very humble v j 
commencement. As soon as he was ordained he was* 

. - ; -.*-;, . ^ * *- -^ *..*. - * ; ^ > ,y *. "" - * 

appofnted to the retired mission of Dee Castle, in 
Aberdeenshire. The poor congregation then had, 
at the time; no suitable place for the celebration, o 
public worship. There were on the banks of the 
River Dee, the ruined walls of an ancient castle. 
These walls Mr. Scott contrived to fashion into a 
church. Having thus gained experience in the art 
of architecture, he afterwards built a modest, but 






-. 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



797 



convenient chapel and dwelling house under the same 
roof. In 1800 he was removed to the charge of the 
Huntly mission ; and, as if five years were his 
destined time in each of the minor missions, he was 
appointed in 1*805 to the mission of Glasgow, which, 
by this time had grown to large proportions, and 
which, through the truly Herculean labours of its 
new apostle, was destined so soon to surpass in num 
bers and importance all the missions of the country. 
Previously to the appointment of Mr. Scott, the 
few Catholics of Glasgow were ministered to by the 
Reverend Alexander McDonell, who afterwards be 
came the founder of a church in the new world, and was 
long known as the Hon. and Right Rev. Bishop 
of Kingston, in Canada. When this eminent priest 
proceeded on his new destination the Glasgow con 
gregation came under the pastoral care of the Rev. 
John Farquarson. This zealous priest erected a 
church in the district called "the Caltoh." Although, 
at this time, Catholics were becoming numerous in 
Glasgow, they were under the necessity of living as 

*"^* ". - . * *;."X" " . ^ ."*". \ 

retired as possible, such was still the danger, notwith 
standing the better feeling towards them of the more 
intelligent citizens, lest the very fact of their numbers 
might become a cause of popular excitation. There 
were no traces of their religion in the villages and 
counties around the great commercial city, if unless, 






. 



798 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



indeed, we except the wreck of the cathedrals, mon 
asteries, religious and educational houses that once 
adorned the land. 

Meanwhile, Catholic Ireland contributed largely, 
as it still contributes, to promote the growth and im 
portance of the Glasgow congregation. Mechanics 
of that country skilled and unskilled workmen 
sought the Scotch commercial city in order to find 
that employment which their native land denied them. 
The cotton trade had been successfully introduced in 
to Glasgow, and hence those people found the occu 
pation they so much needed. The new trade gave 
them their bread, and to the city wealth and aggran 
dizement. The Irish comers were at first exposed 
to much obloquy, not only on account of their country 
against which there existed an incredible amount of 
illiberal prejudice, but, more particularly still, on re 
ligious grounds, there being nothing so odious as 
"Popery" to the Presbyterian mind of the time. 
Such prejudices, however, proved only an ineffectual 
check ; and the industrious Irish,, encouraged by the 
more enlightened manufacturing "citizens, continued/ 
to flockjnto Glasgow, bearing with them the light of 
their reviled faith, which was destined, ere long, to 
shine aniid the darkness and command universal 
respect. 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



799 






To form these ever increasing elements into a 
well-disciplined, orderly and united congregation, was 
the gigantic task that lay before the zealous mission 
ary ; and he applied to it with all the , strength and. 
energy of a giant. The very inadequate church * 
accommodation of that time was a serious impedi 
ment. A sort of garret chapel in a miserable, dingy 
lane connected with . a street called the Gallowgate, 
was all the place of meeting which the Catholics 
possessed. Their numbers had increased ; but they 
were far from being the imposing congregation which 
now consists of so great a proportion of the popula 
tion of the immense commercial city. The list of 
Easter communicants amounted only to four hundred 
and fifty. Not many years had passed when it 
swelled into a roll of three thousand. This wonder 
ful success was achieved partly by the earnestness 
and vigour with which Mr. Scott ceased hot to preach 
-the word of God ; but more, perhaps, -by his assidu-. 
ity in hearing -confessions- and in visiting the sick. 
* Such duties were far from being easily fulfilled. To 
sit the whole evening till a late hour, under a damp 
unwholesome roof, listening to the recital of the sins 
and cares and sorrows of his people, was sufficiently 
trying, but it was more so still, through the darkness 
of night, and often in the most inclement weather, to 
toil along the streets and lanes to the most wretched 













CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 

hovels of the poor, bend over the fever-stricken, in 
danger every moment of inhaling the poisoned breath 
of pestilence, and confronting death itself while miti 
gating its terrors. It is impossible to imagine a more 
trying, and at the same time, a more consoling labour. 
And well it was that it should bear with it its con 
solation and its fruit ; for, in the case of Mr. Scott, 
the only reward the world offered consisted of the 
sneers and taunts of bigotry, the scoffing of the 
ungodly and the hooting of the ignorant rabble. 
There was no security often against personal viol 
ence, except through the escort of some faithful 
friend. Every day new difficulties arose, but only 
to be surmounted by undaunted courage and success. 
Not the least of these was one occasioned by the 
necessities of the mission, and which it behoved the 
zealous priest to meet. The Calton Chapel, as it 
was called, had become too small for the greatly 
augmented congregation. Thousands of poor Cath 
olics were excluded from its narrow precincts, and, 
as each succeeding Sunday came round, instead of 
participating along with their brethren in the joyful 
celebration of the Sacred Mysteries, could think 
only in sadness and disappointment of the land of 
their fathers and its numerous altars where so many 
joyfully partook of the Bread of Life. The narrow 
and humble chapel must be replaced by a capa- 












. 



, 

W: 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



80 1 









-cious church. But how was this to be done ? 
Only Mr. Scott could conceive the possibility of such 
a work. Relying on the generosity of his numerous 
but comparatively poor congregation, his own energy 
and the aid of Heaven, he undertook the building of 
St. Andrew s Church in a conspicuous part of the 
great city Great Clyde Street. There were many, 
meanwhile, who, taking credit to themselves for sup 
erior wisdom, condemned the undertaking as rash and 
inconsiderate, and which could only tend to humilia 
tion and the injury of religion. The goodly work, 
nevertheless, was boldly undertaken, and proceeded 
with rapidity and success while scarcely any other aid 
was bestowed save the pennies of the poor, so liber 
ally offered in ever-increasing abundance. This liber 
ality was the more noteworthy as a great commercial 
.crisis had overtaken Glasgow. Public credit was 

-; ,*.. - "* 

Ijshaken, business came to a stand, wages were re- 
.jrjuced, and the price of food increased. - The Catholics 
were dismayed. They looked with sorrowful eyes 
on the unfinished walls, and dreaded their becoming 
a ruin instead of growing into a stately church. One 
alone was not discouraged. Mr. Scott still persev 
ered, hoping against hope. In a short time, not- 
. withstanding all but insuperable difficulties, the sacred 
eMifice was completed, and stood forth a noble monu 
ment of apostolic zeal and the devoted generosity of 





..-v . 



802 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



a Catholic people, while, if it did not excel, it was 
not unworthy of the splendid minister which survives 
entire the wear of time and the violence of fanatic 
rage. There was no mistaking the proof which this 
labour of love afforded, that the Catholics of Glas 
gow could no longer be treated as outcasts whom it 
was safe to jeer and insult. They now assembled in- 
imposing numbers. The thousands that poured 
every Sunday from the grand portal of St. Andrew s 
Church, were indeed a type of that Universal Church 
which the beloved disciple beheld in prophetic vision. 













CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



80;; 







CAP. LXV. 

EDUCATION AT GLASGOW A FAR SEEING MEASURE 

EMINENTLY SUCCESSFUL A CELEBRATED TRIAL 

SCOTT vs. M GAVIN JUST VERDICT SEVERE PARO 
CHIAL LABOUR MR. SCOTT EQUAL %TO THE OCCA- - 

SIGN TEMPORAL BUSINESS RELIEF OF DISTRESS 

MR. SCOTT, COMFORTER OF THE AFFLICTED- 

AND FRIEND OF THE CLERGY A TROUBLESOME- 

ASSOCIATION THE SAME DECLARED ILLEGAL ON 

THE AUTHORITY OF DANIEL o cONNELL SCHIS 
MATIC ALSO AND HERETICAL MR. SCOTT HIGHLY 

ESTEEMED THE DEFENDER OF HIS PEOPLE HIS 
SUCCESS AS LEGAL COUNSEL. 

While the Catholics of Glasgow were rejoicing 
over the successful completion of the house of God .& 
there arose another want which caused no slight 
anxiety to the zealous pastor. l There were no means >j 
for educating the numerous children of the flock. 
Hundreds of them were clamouring for the bread of 
instruction ; and there was none to break it to them. 
Hence, in a manner, coerced, Mr. Scott was obliged 
to choose between the certainty of vice and some 
degree of danger as regarded purity of faith. The ; 
measure he adopted was, indeed, a bold one ; and did 






toaik. ---.. 



804 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



not remain unquestioned. By many it was even de 
clared to be inadmissible. The experience of many 
years, however, has pronounced in its favour shown 
that it bore not with it the dreaded evil, while it re 
sulted in incalculable good, and proved to be the re 
solve of a far-seeing and no ordinary mind. An 
offer had been made of Protestant co-operation, on 
condition that the Protestant version of the Scriptures 

should be introduced into the schools that were to be 
established. As the teachers were to be members of 
:the congregation who could point out to their pupils 
and warn them as regarded the passages of the 
Protestant Bible complained of by Catholics, and 

. -which tended to sustain a few of the Protestant views, 
the faithful pastor found it less difficult to overcome 
this reluctance to allow the objectionable version to 
fee read in the schools ; and, rather than see so many 
children, the hope of his rising flock, abandoned to 

I dgnorance and vice, he gave his consent. The result 
was that many of those that were without, came 
forward with donations of money and books, making 

-at the same time, kind and liberal speeches on the 
grand subject of dispensing unto all the blessings of 
^education. There appears to have been no difficulty 

.in having Catholic teachers appointed ; and, for the 
.first time since the days of Knox, there existed 
Catholic schoolb at Glasgow. This was indeed a 






, 






CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



805 






great and most beneficial achievement. Far from 
corrupting the faith of the Catholic youth, it gave to- 
the future a well-instructed congregation, every 
member of which was prepared " to give a reason for 
the faith that was in him." Extensive school pre 
mises were obtained in Portugal Street and perma 
nently secured to religion, being converted into a 
church under the invocation of St. John. Meanwhile, 
they were admirably adapted to receive the numerous 
children that flocked to them. Such was the " Gor- 
bals School," as it was called. It soon became in 
sufficient to accommodate the great number that the 
love of instruction brought from all parts of the city. 
Hence several other Catholic Schools came to be 
established in the districts of Anderstown, Bridge 
town Calton, Cowcaddens, and North Quarter. 

It was now the lot of the good priest of Glasgow 
to encounter- a new and most serious trouble. One 

r V/ *"* -\ " * "* 

^Mr. Gavin, a native^of Ayrshire ani a rigid Presby 
terian, who had tried all sorts of trades and passed 
through a strange variety of fortune, settled, at 
length, for a time, in Glasgow as the editor of a pub 
lication called The Protestant. This publication was 
very unsparing in its attacks on Catholics. It was 
encouraged in its evil course by a newspaper of the 
place, the Glasgow Qhronicle. This journal, in July, 
1818, threw out some sarcastic and libellous remarks 









8o6 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



which were afterwards repeated by T7ie Protestant, 
regarding an Oratorio for a charitable purpose, which 
took place in St. Andrew s Church soon after it was 
finished. The Rev. Mr. Scott was accused of 
" extorting money to build his chapel by a sort of 
poll tax from the starving Irish, and that by the fear 
of future punishment. Let the means by which 
that house was reared be inscribed upon its front, 
and it will remain for ages to come, a monument 
of Popish hard-heartedness and cruelty." Again: 
" The house that is building west of the Chapel, 
and which is, it is said, intended for the manse, 
will be large enough to accommodate a dozen of 
priests, while they remain unmarried, as they must 
always do ; from which I infer that Mr. Scott either 

has, or intends to have, abundant assistance in milk- 
s ing and managing his flock. It is doubtful how far 

he exhibits the character of a faithful pastor, while he 

. ~ .. ,1 - : - 

seems to care only for himself. He asked no answer 

, or explanation from his flock; it was for himself as 
an individual." Mr. McGavin also published that 
" Father Scott refused to baptize the children of 
several labourers (whose names, unfortunately for him 
self, he specified) until they contributed towards the 
building of the new Chapel and paid up all their 

- arrears ; and that the masters of certain public works 
were applied to, to retain the weekly earnings of 






CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



SO/ 



Catholic employees to aid the erection of the said 
Roman Catholic Chapel." 

Such calumnies could only be swept away by a 
successful prosecution. But, considering the state 
o<" the public mind at Glasgow, what hope was there 
-of success in prosecuting?. Bishop Cameron, when . 
consulted, declared that he could see none; and 
hence endeavoured to dissuade Mr. Scott from sub 
mitting the matter to a jury selected from the most 
prejudiced people in. the country. He did not, how- 
. ever, forbid to prosecute ; and Mr. Scott, remarking 
that he must either do so or abandon his mission, 
resolved to bring an action against his rlefamers. 
The damages were laid at ^3,000. The chief de 
tractor, meanwhile, encouraged by the great bulk of 
the less educated, classes, who were guided only by 
blind prejudice, shouted defiance, considering him 
self secure. It was a most trying and anxious time 
- for Mr. Scott. His best friends dared not venture . 
to give an opinion in his favour. He "stood alone ,\* 
but was undaunted and determined. The ablest 
barrister of the time, - m the celebrated Jeffrey, was 
retained as his counsel; and applied to the work 
before him with no less earnestness than ability. 
His speech at the trial was a consummate master 
piece of forensic oratory. Bishop Cameron, who, 
after giving his evidence, had been invited by the 









8o8 



CATHOLICS Of SCOTLAND. 



presiding Judge to take a seat on the Bench, could 
not refrain from complimenting the eloquent counsel,, 
and remarked that his able discourse must ensure 
success. Jeffrey, surveying the Jury, where there 
was not much respectability to be seen, expressed 
much doubt. There was, however, unconquerable 
honesty and a sense of justice which no want of 
education and no amount of false teaching could 
ever eradicate from the minds of the Scotch people, 
even in the humblest walks of life. The twelve 
jurymen, after hearing the charge of the Right 
Honourable William Adam, Lord Chief Commis 
sioner, retired for rather more than an hour. A little 
before, five o clock in the morning, they returned into- 
Court, and unanimously found for the pursuer, 
against the defender, William McGavin, damages 
100; aeainst the defender, William Sym, Clerk of 
the Glasgow Fever Hospital, 20 ; and against the 
/defenders, Andrew and James Duncan, printers in 
Glasgow, one shilling. Mr. McGavin s damages,, 
together with his law expenses, were computed at 
,1,400. The twelve ordinary Glasgow jurymen,. > 
it has-been well remarked, "in spite of the preju 
dices of their education, in spite of their religious- 
antipathies, in spite of the fierce controversies of the 
day, in spite of all the means used to excite their 
anti-Catholic feelings, when it came to the points 






CATHOLICS O? SCOTI^AND. 



809 





threw their prejudices to the wind, stood to immortal 
justice, and vindicated the cause even of a Catholic 
priest.". 

Mr. Scott could now, with an undisturbed mind, 
devote himself to the fulfilment of his parochial 
duties. These duties were necessarily very onerous, 
the congregation being so numerous and scattered 
over the increasing city of Glasgow. In visiting the 
sick and hearing confessions the zealous pastor was 
most assiduous, as well as in preaching frequently in 
a crowded church. At all times, but particularly 
when epidemics raged, visiting the sick was very 
trying and even dangerous. Mr. Scott was not to be 
dismayed. Typhus fever, small pox, even the dread 
cholera morbus had no terrors for him. He was al 
ways found when required, whether in the day time 
or the dead of night, by the bed side of the dying, 
speaking words of consolation and administering the 
grace-giving sacraments. If we may judge by the ; " 
wise instructions which he imparted to the clergy, he^ 

id not neglect such precautions as prudence dictated, 
and on the utility of which science has pronounced. 
He advised the priests who assisted him to carry with | 
them camphor or other disinfectants, to remain only ,- 
as long as necessary near persons stricken with in 
fectious or contagious disease, to refrain, as much as 
possible, from inhaling new air, when in a sick room, >if 









8/o 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



to avoid swallowing saliva and to wash their hands 
immediately after visiting an infected person. The 
propriety of this last recommendation was well shown 
by a case which occurred at the Edinburgh Infirmary. 
A medical student there had neglected, after attend 
ing to a typhus fever patient, to wash his hands, as 
was the custom of the house. He was immediately 
seized with the terrible fever and. died, exclaiming : 
44 O, had I but washed my hands ! had I but washed 
,my hands !" 

It was scarcely less safe, after great exertion in the 
pulpit, to sit for hours, often till a late hour in the 
evening, hearing confessions in the newly built church. 
This was fearlessly done ; nevertheless. The iron 
constitution of Mr. Scott was proof against every trial. 

It fell to the lot of Mr. Scott to transact a great 
deal of temporal business in connection with his im 
portant mission. His punctuality in making all 
necessary payments and his judiciousness in the out 
lay of money won for him a golden name among all 
with whom he came to have business relations. Nor 
did he neglect the poor. His hand was ever open 
for the relief of distress. Even his good natured, 
unstudied salute in the streets was cheering to his 
more humble friends. But this was nothing to the 
kindness and charity which gave comfort to the dis 
consolate and shed a halo over the gloom of the 






..t.rtr .><-. 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



SlI 








scaffold. His tact and wisdom in ruling the exten 
sive mission committed to his charge could not be 
surpassed. There was a certain manliness and at 
the same time bonhomie in his manner which few 
could resist. It was the result of his essential up 
rightness, and caused his friendship to be so precious 
and his counsels so valuable to his brother clergymen. 
In 1825 a set of illiteratepeople called the Cath-. 
olie Association, gave great annoyance to Mr. Scott. 
These people published a pamphlet in their defence, 
and inveighed against what they called "the un 
warrantable, unprovoked and very surprising attack" 
of the. Rev. A. Scott and the Rev. J. Murdoch, 
pastors of the Glasgow Catholic congregation. 
They remarked also on being excluded from all 
knowledge of the state of the funds or the manage- . 
ment of the temporalities, and pointed out a plan 
for obtaining their right in this respect. This pre 
cious Association originated through the mistaken 
zeal of some Irish members of the Church, and 
became the cause of the endless vexations which 
ever since that time have beset and annoyed . the 
national bishops and priests in the West of Scot 
land. Several- news sheets were enlisted in their 
service. Mr. Scott thundered against them in 
the pulpit, and in a style not the less vigourous for < 
being peculiarly his own. He pronounced the Asso-. 




812 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



ciation illegal on the authority of Daniel O ConheU; 
arid declared, moreover, that all meetings held inde 
pendently of and in defiance of their pastors were 
schismatic and heretical. In a memorial or requi 
sition for the redress of grievances, which they sent 
to Bishop Cameron, they complained that Mr. Scott 
had attacked them from the pulpit, calling them by 
the most offensive names and representing those 
who signed the requisition, as " illiterate rag-a- 
muffins," comparing the roughness of their hand 
writing to their " tattered coats," and recommending 
them, if they had any money to spare to use it in 
purchasing old clothes to cover their naked members. 
He declared, moreover, that he knew little of them, 
but by the scandel they had given to religion. 

Although there were a few rebels who gave trouble, 

Mr. Scott was greatly revered by the congregation 

generally." He was a strict disciplinarian, and it not 

unfrequently behoved him to. rebuke offenders. But 

even they who quailed beneath the lash of his just 

.* 

indignation, lost not confidence in his goodness; 

*and had recourse to him when occasion required, 
with undiminished trust and affection. He was ever 
ready to defend his people when any difficulty occur 
red from the real or supposed state of the law. An 
instance, or two may prove not uninteresting ; Some 
of his flock had been summoned to qualify as Bur- 






..i t. 








CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 813 

gesses, and were told that if they did not, their shops 
would be shut. But, on presenting themselves, they 
were called on to take an oath which implied an 
abjuration of their Faith. Upon this Mr. Scott took 
the matter in hand, and visited, more than once, the 
Dean of Guild in his Court. This official gave proof 
of extraordinary ignorance of the law, as did, also, his 
legal adviser. Such lawyers of the city as were sup 
posed to possess some liberality, were asked to act 
on behalf of Mr. Scott s friends ; but none of them 
could be induced to take up. the case. The burden, 
therefore, fell on Mr. Scott, who proved the actual 
state of the law, and at the same time threatened 
legal proceedings against the ignorant authorities. 
He thus caused his congregation to be fairly treated, 
and complete justice to be done. 






. . 









814 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 






CAP. LXVI. 

" NEVER HAD A CATHOLIC TO HANG " THE ROTHESAY 

-CICERONE " A SACRAMENTAL SATURDAY " THE 

STORY OF WITIIERINGTON MR. SCOTT, BISHOP 

BOTH PORTIONS OF THE WESTERN DISTRICT UNDER 

HIS CARE GREAT LABOURS CHURCHES PROVIDED 

IN HIGHLANDS AND LOWLANDS BISHOP SCOTT s 

LEGAL KNOWLEDGE SETTLES A LONG PENDING 

DISPUTE CHURCHES AND MISSIONS MULTIPLYING 

CONSEQUENT INCREASE OF EPISCOPAL DUTY 

CONVENT OF THE GOOD SHEPHERD SACRILEGEOUS 

THEFT REV. JOHN MURDOCH, COADJUTOR 

BISHOP SCOTT RETIRES TO GREENOCK HIS DEATH 

ON 4TH DECEMBER, 1846 RIGHT REVEREND JAMES 

KYLE, FIRST BISHOP OP THE NORTHERN DISTRICT 

HIS LEARNING RETIRED LIFE GOLDEN JUBILEE - 

-DIED AT PRESHOME IN 1869, AGED 80. 

An execution was about to take place. Mr. Scott 
attended the condemned man and prepared him to 
meet his fate. When the day of execution was near 
-at hand, it occurred to a Presbyterian minister and 
to the magistrates that it would be contrary to use 
and wont, as well as to propriety, if a Catholic priest 
were seen publicly on the scaffold. The priest was 





CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 815 

nowise disposed to leave the soul of his parishioner 
to "heretical care" in his last moments, and objected 
to the services of the minister on the occasion, firmly 
declaring that "he would never consent to any such 
iniquity." A magistrate was then, after serious con 
sultation, deputed to remonstrate with the refractory 
priest. The Bailie s (alderman s) odd reasoning was 
in the folio wing terms: "Mr. Scott," he said, " I have 
never in all my life, known of a Catholic priest 
, being on the scaffold at an execution." -"For this 

o 

reason," replied the undaunted Mr. Scott, " that you 
never had a Catholic to hang yet." " But if you per 
sist in this determination, it will cause much talk, give 
great offence, and not one shilling more will be sub 
scribed by any Protestant to your new chapel * 
" Nae mater ; I canna help that, nor the like o that; ; 
I maun dae/my duty ; and you ll alloo me to tell ye 
that I sail dae it tae ; na, nae threats 11 frichten me, 
Bailie." The good priest kept his word ; and it may 
be stated, as showing what narrowness still prevailed 
at Glasgow, no Protestant ever after contributed a 
sixpence. 

In familiar lectures to his congregation, Mr. Scott 
exposed the calumnies which Protestants usually in 
dulged in. In connection with this practice, the 
following anecdote is related : A man named Gillis,] 
the cicerone of St. Mary s ruined church at Rothesay, 



v 



. f ,. :a-,*;-/ ..*.... 



8i6 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND, 



was wont to play on the credulity of tourists. In 
pointing out the holy water stoup this man informed 
inquiring travellers that the Papist Bishop of Glas 
gow came, every year, and washed his face in it. One 
day that Dr. Scott was at Rothesay, he accompanied 
some friends to see the interesting ruins. As the 
cicerone talked, he listened patiently, and, giving a 
hint to his friends, he said to Gillis : " Aye, and dae 
ye ken the Papist Bishop O Glasgae ? "- " Hoot aye, 
fine that, when he comes, he winna lat me see what 
he is gaun to dae, but tells me to stan oot by there 
till he s dune." " Aweell man," quoth the Bishop, 
"yer this day in a snorl ; for I m the Papist Bishop 
you ve sae aften seen, come to wash his face, an tauld 
the folk aboot ; here s a saxpence for yer trouble." 

It happened that some members of the congrega 
tion had their shops open or did some work about 
them on a "Sacramental Saturday." On this account 
they "were summoned to the police office. Mr. Scott 
nndertook their defence, and .disposed of the case in 
a manner that was st once summary and satisfactory. 
When he appeared at the bar of the police court he 
reminded the magistrate that the "sacramental fast" 
was imposed by nothing more than Ecclesiastical Law 
and that any violations of it could be punished only 
by Ecclesiastical pains and penalties. He, therefore, 
called on him to inflict only such punishment. To 






- 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



8l 7 



this kind of infliction Catholics could have no ob 
jection. 

No notice of the Rev. Andrew Scott wouH be 
-complete without the following story. It is found in 
all the memoirs of the illustrious Prelate and related 
on his own authority : A man named Witherington, 
3. native of the north of Ireland and an Orange 

; Protestant, having lost what property he owned at 
home, came over to Scotland, and by ill luck fell 
into the company "of thieves and depraved persons, 
*ome of whom were nominal Catholics. As for him 
self, he had never once been in a Catholic chapel. 
He dreamt one night that he was chased by devils 
along the salt market of Glasgow, and ran for shel- 
ter into a house where on entering he found a. man 

_ who he afterwards understood was a priest, engaged 
in saying Mass. Hearing the noise of Withering- 

; ton s sudden entering the priest turned round and 
bade him be comfprted, for as soon as he had 
finished: he would accompany him home. This he 
did, both of them walking together along certain 
streets of Glasgow towards Witherington s lodgings. 
He awoke before reaching them He thought little 
of the dream at the time,, but, nevertheless, related 
it to his companions. Sometime after he was per 
suaded by two or three of them to accompany 
them to the Catholic chapel in Glasgow, which was 



8l8 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



the only one at that day, and served by Mr. Scott, 
the only priest. Witherington and his companions 
seated themselves awaiting the entrance of the 
priest and the beginning of the service. When 
the sacristy door opened and Mr. Scott came oct r _ 
Witherington started, uttered an exclamation, and 
whispered to his companions that he saw the man in 
the strange dress whom he had seen in his dream. 
He listened attentively to all that was said, and 
recited his own prayers with so*me devotion. He 
-was so far impressed as to take a resolution to amend. 
In a week or two, however, his good purpose was 
forgotten and he returned to his evil courses. Some 
time later, he was arrested for an aggravated robbery, 
committed between Ayr and Kilmarnock, and was- . 
conveyed to Edinburgh to be tried. He was 
^convicted, and; according to the custom of the time,^ 
condemned to death. It was determined that he 
should remain in the jail of Edinburgh til! the day 
before the execution, when he was to be taken back/ ! 
to Glasgow and thence, on the fatal morning; to the 1 -":, 
spot where the robbery had been committed. His 
route through Glasgow to the jail was the same as 
he had taken when flying from the devils in his 
<lream. His -way from the jail was the same 
7 as .that by which the priest had conducted him 
towards his lodgings. Witherington s accomplice in! 







CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



819 



the robbery, also under sentence, was a Catholic. 
Thellev. Alex. Badenoch, one of the priests of Edin 
burgh, attended him. Witherington begged to be 
instructed. As the day of the execution approached 
it was arranged that Mr. Scott should accompany 
the convicts out of Glasgow, and that Bishop Paterson,. 
who was then in charge of the Paisley mission, should 
take his place and attend them on the scaffold, as the 
place of execution lay in his mission. The day be 
fore their last the prisoners were removed to Glasgow^ 
Bishop Paterson and Mr. Scott visited them in the 
jail. Witherington s cell was a dark one; but the 
moment Mr. Scott entered it the convict accosted 
him by name. When asked if he knew the priest,, 
he replied although he had never before spoken to- 
him he should know his face among a thousand. On. 
learning the arrangements for next morning Wither- 
cington burst into tears. When pressed to tell the 
~ cause,, the poor fellow with difficulty related his dream 
and entreated -Mr. Scott to go with him .all -the way, - 
To this the good priest consented, and encouraged 
and comforted the humble penitent at intervals on 
the awful journey, finally inspiring him with the hope 
to obtain mercy from the Eternal Judge. 

Whilst Mr. Scott laboured with astonishing success 
in promoting the cause of religion, he was, at the 
same time, its brighest ornament. A true and faith- 






820 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



ful shepherd, he was always at his post and ever 
.watchful to guard his flock when danger arose, and 
vigourously defend its members when ungenerously 
attacked, as was often the case in those days of 
ignorance and narrow-mindedness. Such merit as 
his could not be overlooked. It was resolved, accord 
ingly, that he should be elevated to Episcopal dig- 
.nity. The advancing years of Bishop Ranald Mc 
Donald rendered it necessary that in his extensive - 
district he should have the aid of a coadjutor. His 
.brother Bishop of the Eastern District joined with 
him in petitioning to this effect, and the Holy See, 
acceding to their wishes, in 1827 appointed Mr. 
jScott Bishop of Eretria and coadjutor, with right of 
succession, to the Right Reverend Bishop McDonald 
in the newly constituted Western District. The con 
secration took place in St Andrew s Church, Glas- - 
gow, Bishop Paterson officiating, assisted by Bishops 
McDonald and Penswick. ;>- . 

"The new Bishop continued to reside in Glasgow, 

advancing, with his usual energy, the work of religion 

in the Lowland portion of the Western District, which 

.may truly be said to have been the result of his own 

indefatigable labours. Towards the end of 1832 the 

.management of the whole district devolved on him, 

m consequence of the death of Bishop McDonald. 

He was not less mindful of the Highland than of the 







CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



821 - 








Lowland portion of his charge. Churches were 
needed in many parts of the Highlands; and the 
ever-active Bishop lost no time in providing them/ 
This important work cost him many journeys and 
much labour. But meanwhile North Morar, Glen 
garry, Morven, South Uistand Benbecula, Badenoch, 
Fort Augustus, Arlsaig, and last, but not least, 
Glencoe, were supplied with suitable churches. -In- 
alluding to the last-named place, Bishop Gillis, in his 
funeral sermon, recalling a too memorable fact -of 
history, thus spoke of the celebrated valley : "To 
thee, also, he gave an altar of expiation, red vale of 
mourning, long widowed Glencoe!" It must not 
be supposed, however, that the Highlands, so dear 
to the Catholic heart, absorbed all the care and 
energy of the Apostolic Bishop. New missions at 
the same time were springing up throughout the 
.Lowlands^ ^Religion, freed from her cruel bonds/; 
appeared to be resuming possession of her ancient ~ 
strongholds. New churches arose in Airdrie, New-; 
ton Stewart, Houston, Barrhead .and Duntocher, 
whilst many others were improved and enlarged. 
So much successful work was, in great measure, due 
to the Bishop s wonderful ability in the transaction 
of business. Nothing was overlooked or omitted 
by him that required his care and judicious consider 
ation. Disputes and difficulties were avoided by the 



- 



$22 CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



pains which he took in writing contracts. They 
were submitted, moreover, to the scrutiny of his, 
" man of business " (legal adviser), although his 
own knowledge of law was, not unfrequently, found 
to surpass that of his learned-attorney. 

Bishop Scott s knowledge was great ; his sound 
ness of judgment, if possible, greater still. His 
sense of justice was no less complete ; and these 
qualities being universally recognized throughout 
England and Ireland as well as Scotland, it was 
considered safe to appeal to him in cases of the 
greatest difficulty. The long standing dispute be- 
tween the English secular clergy and. the powerful 
Benedictine Order was referred to him for final 
settlement. He took the whole case into considera 
tion, and after mature deliberation gave his decision, 
which was accepted without a murmur by both secu--^ 
Jars and regulars. 

~ f ^ *V 

The addition of the Highlands and Western -Isles ^ 
to his Episcopal care greatly increased his apostolic 
~ labours ; and he never shrank from them, meeting them 
all with his wonted energy. Neither the most fatigu-; 
ing journeys by land, where no conveyance could be 
used, nor the waves and storms of the wild Atlantic, 
v were any hindrance to his unconquerable activity. 
He beheld only the desolation of many Highland 
t - missions, arrd used every effort. to rendetfthem ,prps- 









; 



SJ-..L 






CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



823 



perous and flourishing. His solicitude for the High 
lands did not, however, diminish his care of the Low 
land country. As has been seen, missions and 
churches multiplied through his zeal ; and the pro 
gress which he inaugurated is still a remarkable 
feature of the West of Scotland. There was 
wanting, as yet, an Ecclesiastical Seminary. The 
Bishop, anxious that there should be a sufficient 
number of clergy trained at home, purchased the 
estate of Dalbeth v near Glasgow, with a view to 
establish there a College for his Vicariate. There 
was on the estate a finely-situated mansion house, 
which, the Western District having its share in the 
College of Blairs, together with the other two districts, 
is now devoted to a more urgent want, that of the 
Convent of the Good Shepherd. 

The Bishop in the midst of his success met some 
times with serious mortifications. Such was the 
- sacrilegious theft of the chalice of I ona, which he had 
.inherited from his predecessor,. Bishop McDonald. 
One night that the safe for^keeping the altar plate of 
St Mary s Church was left unlocked, thieves broke 
into the vestry, and carried off the precious relic. It 
was afterwards found, but, cut to pieces, ready for the 
inelting-pot. (See Cap. on Bishop McDonald, and 
Sir Daniel Wilson s Pire-historic Annals of Scotland.) 



- 



824 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 






From 1833 Bishop Scott enjoyed the aid of a 
coadjutor, who was no other than the Right Reverend 
John Murdoch, whose career, .afterwards, as Vicar- 
Apostolic, was .50 brilliant. By 1836, the venerable 
Bishop s health was so much impaired that he felt 

. himself to be unequal to the ever-increasing business 
of Glasgow and the surrounding country. In order 
to obtain some relief he retired to the less laborious 
field which the town of Greenock presented. He 
continued, nevertheless, to devote himself to the care 
of his numerous flock. But the duties "which he still 
performed were too arduous for his decreasing 
strength, and, finally, broke down his vigourous 
constitution. The illness which proved to be his 
last, was of long duration. It is believed to have 
originated in the damp vestries of his church at 
Glasgow, when, as yet, but newly erected. It could 

,_not be otherwise than -unwholesome to remain for 
hours in those vestries, hearing confessions^ after 
great exertions in the pulpit every Sunday. But the 
danger of illness. could not deter him from giving the 
comfort and consolation - of his ministry to his 
numerous penitents. Years and labours at length 
did their fatal work. The good Bishop sank 
gradually to his rest, giving no sign of intellectual 

decay save, occasionally, a slight and momentary. 



wandering of the mind. He was perfectly resigned 










CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



.825 



to the will of God, and made over, without a murmur," 
the staff of his authority to his successor, begging, at 
the same time, his forgiveness for leaving him so 
much to do. T-his was, indeed, although he thought 
it not, pronouncing his own eulogium. He died at 
his residence, Shaw street," Greenbck, on the 4th; 
December, 1846, aged seventy-four years and ten 
months. His funeral took place at St. Mary s Church, 
Glasgow, Bishop Gillis preaching on the occasion an 
appropriate and eloquent sermon. ..*"-; 

All Bishop Scott s sermons, admonitions, warnings, 
and exhortations to his people were delivered in the 
old Scotch dialect. He must have done so for 
greater edification, for none could write or speak 
better English, as is shown by some sermons of his, 
composition which are preserved at Greenock. 

The first Bishop, of the Northern District, the 
-Right Reverend James Kyle, was born at Edinburgh - 
-on the 22nd of September, 1788. He ^studied at 
the Seminary of Aquorties from 1799^1!! 1808, whenj 
he was appointed to a professorship in that Institu 
tion. He was promoted to the priesthood on the 
2 1 st of March, 1812. During the long period that 
elapsed between that time and -January, 1826, he 
continued to act as a Professor at Aquorties. He 
was then stationed at St. Andrew s, Glasgow. He 
was not long engaged in that laborious mission 




\ 






826 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 






when his Superior next caused him to be called to 
the Episcopal office. On the ijth February, 1827, 
were received in Scotland the Briefs by which he. 
was nominated Bishop of Germanicia and Vicar- 
Apostolic of the newly-constituted Northern District 
His consecration took place at Aberdeen in Sep 
tember of the following year. He lived to enjoy his 
golden jubilee ; and, what js not a little extra- 

ordinary, it was celebrated in Glenlivat, and not at 
Preshome, his favourite residence, and which had 
been so long the chief seat of the missions of Scot 
land. All the time that could be spared from the 
faithful discharge of his Episcopal duties he devoted 
to the collection of manuscripts and printed papers 
connected with the history of the country and the 
Church. He enjoyed the reputation of being one 
of the best antiquaries of his time. . It is matter for 
surprise that, with all his ability and knowledge, he 

"never -gave any writing to the public. The writer 
has heard him say that his only contribution to the 
annals of the land must be facts ; and that he left it. 
to those who should come after him to present them, 
in the attractive style of finely-written history, -^i 

The long and useful career of this learned Prelate 
came to an end at Preshome in 1869, when he had 

1 reached the advanced age of eighty. 










CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



827 




CAP. LXVII. 

BIRTH OF THE RT. REV. ANDREW CARRUTHERS -CHOOSES . 

THE ECCLESIASTICAL STATE STUDIES AT DOUAI 

HIS RETURN TO SCOTLAND PREFECT AT SCALAN 

COMPLETES HIS STUDIES AT ABERDEEN ORDAINED 
PRIEST ON 25TH MARCH, 1 1/95: IN CHARGE OF 
BALLOCH MISSION CHAPLAIN AT TRAQUAIR, AT 
MUNSHES AND DALBEATTIE MUCH REVERED 
EXTENDS THE31ISSION HIS GARDEN AN AMATEUR 
CHEMIST CLASSICAL STUDIES ^RETIRED LIFE 

ATTENDS A MEETING VICAR-APOSTOLIC OF THE 

" . - v 

EASTERN DISTRICT NINE MISSIONS | AND TEN 

PRIESTS BUILDS ST. PATRICK S CHURCH, EDIN- 
L BURGH MORE CHURCHES- AKNAN CHURCHES 

AND CLERGY MORE THAN TREBLED ST. ANDREW S 

SOCIETY, ^v, . 

-.Bishop Paterson was succeeded in the Eastern 
Vicariate by the Right Reverend Andrew Carruthers, 

This Prelate was born at Glenmillan near New Abbey 

- , - -., . - ,-- * 

in the -Stewartry of Kirkcudbright -on the : 7th of^ 
February, 1 770. He was of a highly respectable an 
cient family that had persevered in the Catholic Faith 
amidst all the trials and persecutions of the last and 
preceding century. His early education was acquired- 



\ 



828 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



in the quiet and retired village near which he first 
saw the light a village famed for the romantic scenery 
around it, and for its time honoured abbey which still 
remains in its ruins a noble monument of the glories 
of a bygone age. As if catching inspiration from the 
mouldering pile, young Carruthers was wont in his 
boyhood to wander up and down the shattered aisles 
arid to explore every hidden nook of the sacred place. 
This remarkable taste, together with the thoughtful 
and serious turn of mind which he so early displayed, 
won for him among his playmates the name of the 
"young priest." The grace of Heaven crowning his 
.natural disposition, his future destiny may be said to 
have been then determined on ; and so, his devout 
parents consenting, he made his choice and dedicated 
himself to the service of God in the Ecclesiastical state. 
With a view to carrying out his laudable purpose, 
and after having acquired some knowledge of the 
Latin and Greek classics, he entered in the sixteenth. 

*"- V ^ " -I-" .*: - - . -- 

year of his age the Scotch College of Douai. In ; 
the course of the six years that he remained there 
he gave proof in the public schools of the University 
v of that place astonishing progress in every branch of 
literature and science. He was already well advanced 
in his theological studies when the terrible Revolt!- 
tion, which broke out hi France in 1792, obliged 
him to abandon^ them for a time, and to make his 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



-829 






escape along with others of his fellow-students to " . 
his native land. He arrived there, at -length, in * 
safety, after having encountered great difficulties and 
incurred much danger. On his return to Scotland 
he was appointed Prefect of Studies at Scalan. He jj 
was noted there for the perfect order and discipline 
.which he maintained, and after a short term of office 
he went to complete his theological studies at Aber- ^ 
deen, under the guidance of the Rev. John Farquar-V$| 
son, formerly Rector of Douai College. In due 
time he was advanced to the priesthood by Bishop 
Hay. His ordination took place on the festival of 
the Annunciation, 25th March, 1795. 

Mr. Carruthers, immediately after his ordination, 
was placed in charge of the laborious misson of 
Balloch. Within thejrange of this mission were 
Drummond Castle, so long the residence of the Dukes 
of Perth, and the town of Crief, together with the 
Highlands of Perthshire. The Catholics, although ? 
few in number, were widely scattered throughout 
these mountainous regions ; and, notwithstanding the 
difficulties they had to contend with in fulfilling the 
duties of their religion, had faithfully adhered. to 
it during the most trying times. The young priest 
was most zealous in theYdischarge of, his duties 

J"i- * "* - 

towards this devoted remnant of his fellow-Catholics. 
He afforded them the consolation of numerous visits 



830 CATHOLICS Or SCOTLAND. 

and frequent administration of the sacraments of the 
Church, -travelling on foot from house to house, 
through the beautiful glens and mountain passes of 
the country. 

In 1797 he removed to Traquair in Peebles-shire. 
There his duties were less onerous, but riot less 
faithfully fulfilled. He acted as chaplain to the noble 
family of the Stewarts, Earls of Traquair, and as 
missionary priest among the Catholics of the 
neighbouring country. 

It appeared to be the destiny of Mr. Carruthers to 
move southwards. In three years more towards the 
end of 1800, he was appointed to the mission of Mun- 
shes, in his native county. Munshes was the seat 
of an ancient family, stiH Catholic, at the time of this 
appointment. There were to be exercised not only 
the -duties of family chaplain, but at the same time the 
more laborious charge of the numerous Catholics of the 
neighbourhood "who assembled for the public offices of 

; religion in the chapel of Munshes House. There the 

priest resided until some years later, the property 

-falling to Protestant heirs, and the domestic chapel, 

-besides, being too small for the congregation, he 

removed to the neighbouring village of Dalbeattie, 

where, in 1814, he expended a portion of the funds 

left to the mission by Miss Agnes Maxwell, the last 
Catholic who held the estate of Munshes, in building 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



83 




a church and house on a piece of ground which he 
had acquired for the purpose. 

As may be well supposed Mr. Carruthers quitted 
with regret. the hospitable mansion of Munshes, 
where he and his predecessors had been so kindly 
maintained for generations, and the cause of religion 
encouraged and upheld. During the two and thirty - 
years that he presided over the mission in his new 
home, he was a most assiduous but unostentatious 
labourer in the spiritual field confided to his care. 
He was diligent, particularly in instructing the young" 
and causing the members of his congregation 
generally to fulfil the duties of religion. . He had a 
certain sternness of manner, which, instead of being 
a hindrance, rather facilitated the maintenance of 
discipline. His horror of all wickedness was so wclK 
known that his very frown was a terror to evil doers. ~ 
; Meanwhile he failed hot to cultivate the amenities of 
social life ; and hence became a favourite among the 
leading characters of the country and the people 
generally.. Such were the reverence and propriety 
that he caused^to be observed in the house of God : 
*: that perfect silence prevailed during the celebration 
of Mass ; so much so that not even a cough "came to 
disturb the solemnity of the holy service. H is mission 
extending during twenty-five years, to -the whole ; 
: J5tewartry of Kirkcudbright with the exception of a - 



s**? > 



.032 CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 

small, portion near Dumfries, and as far into the 
county of Wigton as the Irish channel, it may be 
conceived what a load of duty was imposed upon him. 
In so wide a district, there were several congregations 
requiring his attendance. There were stations which 
he formed at Kirkcudbright, the county town, at 
Gatehouse and Parton in the one county, and New 
ton Stewart in the other. All these stations he 
visited regularly during his incumbency, with the 
exception of Newton Stewart, to which the Rev. 
Dr. Sinnot was appointed in 1825. An idea of his 

.arduous labours may be conceived when it is stated 
that one of the stations was forty miles distant from 
his home, another twenty miles, and none of them 
less than twelve miles, and that now, four priests are 
employed in attending to the duties which it fell on 
him so long to fulfil alone. 

Mr. .Carruthers, notwithstanding his multifarious 
spiritual occupations, found leisure .to. improve the 
rugged piece of land around the- church and house 

which he had built, In this he was eminently sue- 

- "-.*- *..^ ".*-.rr . 

cessful. In the rocky parts he planted shrubs and 
plants of various kinds ; and, the more level places, 
where there was any soil, he adapted for flowers and 
vegetables. He was an excellent botanist and took 
great delight in cultivating a variety of the most 
beautiful flowers. Every portion of his garden was 












CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 833 

very tastefully laicl out, in so much that he acquired 
in the neighbourhood the two-fold reputation of beng 
an admirable gardener and landscape gardener. His 
work became an object of curiosity and attraction 
throughout the country ; and whenever there was a 
pleasure ground, a plantation, an avenue, a shrub 
bery or garden to be planned he was invariably con 
sulted 

He had in early life acquired a knowledge of ex 
perimental philosophy. Chemistry, in particular was 
his favourite study ; and he failed not at intervals to 
cultivate this science during his missionary career and 
indeed, throughout his whole lifetime. He was gen 
erally very successful in the ^chemical experiments, 
which he made, as often as he had time for them. 
He took care to acquire the most recent publications 
on the subject of his favourite study. He thus 
became_ aware of every discovery at the earliest 
^moment. When resident at Blairs College, he took 
.pleasure in imparting to the students a taste and lik-: 
ing for the philosophical pursuits in which he him-, 
self took so much^delight. i . 

It might be supposed that so practical a man 
cared little for literature. Letters, nevertheless^ 
were an additional source of pleasure to him. The 
ancient Greek and Latin classics, as well as the 
modern literary authors, were quite familiar to him y- 









834 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



and he possessed that refinement of taste which adds 
so much to the pleasure of such studies. He wrote 
Latin with ease and elegance. Nor did he ever for- _!; : ; 
get the French language, which he had learned so 
well during his earlier years in France. Although 
he never revisited that country, he could still speak 
French with ease and fluency, his diction and pro 
nunciation being singularly correct. He was pos-.. :"^ 
sessed of remarkable conversational power, and ^ 
varied information, and an inexhaustible store of 
anecdote caused his society to be much sought. 
When called upon unexpectedly to speak on public 
occasions, his remarks were always happy and to the . | 
purpose. During his long sojourn in Galloway, he 
enjoyed the esteem of Protestants as well as Catholics. X^ 
The former, notwithstanding his different creed and 
uncompromising, though unobtrusive defence of it, 
sought and courted his acquaintance and society. J 

Mr. Carruthers lived quite retired during the long 
period of his missionary career, and was in conse-^ 
quence little known beyond those portions of the 
country wherd|duty required his presence. " He had 
scarcely any acquaintance with his brother priests, - 
-especially in. the northern part of the country, which, ^ 
at the time, constituted the Lowland District. The 

CS- \/_ - -- \- ; . . - 

remoteness of his residence in great part - accounts 
for this. It is no matter of surprise, therefore, that 












CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. ^ 835: 

he took no part in the questions whrch concerned; 
the general state of the missions ; nor that he did not 
attend any of the meetings of the clergy till the year- 
1827. In that year he was present at the annual! " 
meeting of the friendly society which was held at x^ 
Huntly. On that occasion, by the judicious ami 
timely remarks which he made on the various subjects- 
.that came under discussion, he produced a particularly 1 
favourable impression on the meeting and won the-" 
: esteem of many to whom he had hitherto been quite: 
unknown. He resumed, on returning home, his 
usual routine of duties, little imagining that he was. 
to be torn from his beloved retirement and placed in 
a more prominent position, exchanging the care of a 
^comparatively small portion for the charge of the 
whole Eastern district. 

There was now a delay of two years in filling the 

^ place vacated by the death of the much regretted 

Bishop Paterson, who,- in _ 182 7,^had obtained from 

C> the Holy See a new partition of the Ecclesiastical 

t jurisdiction of Scotland and the establishment of a 

thircTVicariate. The seat of this Vicariate remained 

vacant until 1832, when the Vicars-Apostolic of 

the Western and Northern Districts, with the - 

unanimous concurrence of the clergy, addressed 

a supplication to Pope Gregory XVI., requesting 

the appointment of Mr. Carruthers to the vacant 






836 * 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 






Vicariate. .Briefs, accordingly, were issued on 
the 1 3th of November, 1832, nominating him 
Bishop of Ceramis in partibus iitfirfelium, and Vicar- 
-Apostolic of the Eastern District. The consecra 
tion took place in St*. Mary s, Edinburgh, on the 
I3th of January, 1833, the Right Reverend Dr. Pens- 
wick, at the time Vicar-Apostolic of the Northern 
District of England, officiating as consecrating 
Bishop, assisted by tbe Right Reverend Drs. Scott 
i=and Kyle, Vicars-Apostolic of the Western and 
.Northern Districts of Scotland. 

Mr. Carruthers was far from coveting the dignity 
to which he was now raised. On the contrary he 
accepted it reluctantly and only from obedience. 
His first care was to make himself acquainted with 
the circumstances of the flock to the charge of which 
he was appointed. There were but few missions in 
ihis district and few clergy. The number of the 
former was. nine; and that of the latter ten. There 
were .only eight chapels or churches, and ho reason 
able hope of any immediate accession to the ranks of; 

" the clergy. Funds, besides, were wanting for the erec 
tion of additional churches. T- : - Catholics, mean-" 

, while, were increasing in numbers, although not 
much in opulence. The prospect was anything 
but bright. Nevertheless, the new Bishop, relying 
on the grace of Heaven, did net shrink from 






CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



837 








the arduous duties that lay before him, and zeal 
ously applied to the task of improving the various 
missions, as far as circumstances and the means 
at his disposal would permit. His labours began 
in the capital. There, with .the aid of a -gift 
of money from the late Mr. Menzies of Pitfodels, a. 
munificent benefactor of the missions generally, he 
erected the handsome church of St. Patrick, chiefly 
for the accommodation of the Catholics resident in the 
" old town." The clergy, meanwhile, were not idle. 
Sustained by the encouragement which the Bishop 
gave them, and not unfrequently by his active 
co-operation, they succeeded in raising churches in- 
several important centres. Among these were St_ 
Andrew s (1836) and St. -Mary s (1851) Dundee. 
Stirling and Falkirk were favoured with churches and 
houses for the clergy, chiefly through the exeTtions; 
of the4ate Rev. Dr. Paul McLachlan, distinguished 
-as a controversial writer, with all the aid the Bishop 

could afford. The churches * of Lennoxtown, o 

. * 

Campsie and Arbroath were built under the imme-~ 

i .7- -^V" . " 

diate superintendence of the Bishop himself. He 
also caused an ex-Episcopal church r to be pur- 
chased at Portobello, and houses that were con- 
verted into temporary churches, at "Forfar andT 
Kirkcudbright while a site for a church was acquired at 
Leith. Annan, an outpost of the .mission, of Dum- . 













- 







CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 

fries, was not forgotten. The writer of these sketches 
Toeing at the time assistant priest at the latter place, 
- : it was his duty to visit its dependencies. At Annan 
there was no better place of worship than a room at 
:an inn. There was in the place an unoccupied 
Church which the writer thought might be acquired. 
The Rev. William Reid, the senior priest, concurred 
in his view ; the Bishop gave his countenance, and 
several Catholics their money. Mr. Marmaduke, 
-Constable Maxwell, of Terreagles, subscribing ^50, 
liis brothers, William, Peter, Henry, Joseph, also 
giving handsome sums. Funds were thus provided, 
the church, a substantial stone and lime building, 
purchased, and .adapted to the purposes of Catholic 
^worship. A projection from the south side was con 
verted into a house, according to a plan made by 
.Mr. M. Maxwell, of Terreagles. All this, although ! 
x there had never previously been any attempt to set 
up a Catholic establishment at Annan, appeared only 
to give pleasure to the inhabitants, who, it maybe 
mentioned here, were well known to entertain liberal 
and tolerant sentiments. Of this they gave addi 
tional proof on the day of the opening when they 
^attended in great numbers, listening attentively to 
the "sermons that were delivered by the coadjutor 
Bishop (Right Reverend Dr. Gillis), and the assist 
ant priest The day of opening was a memorable 
























CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



839 



I *." 




. one at Annan. There tjever before had been so, 
/nany Protestants at a Catholic celebration. The 

-Catholics were also fairly represented. The Laird 

of Terreagles and other friends, together with the 
eminent Bishop Gillis, in these days coadjutor of the 
Eastern Vicariate, being present. 

Annan is here mentioned at some length as it is a~ 
place of no slight celebrity. Jt was the parish, 
according to Presbyterian forms, of the renowned 
Edward Irving, who being deprived for entertaining 
non-Presbyterian views, formed a congregation for 
himself in London, and astonished that xapital and 
the Empire by his extraordinary eloquence. - The 
non-Presbyterian Church which he established still 

.exists, and is known as "the Catholic Apostolic 

\ Church." 

. Annan, after some time, became a separate mis 
sion. The house planned by Mr. Maxwell is still, 
used as the priest s residence. The Reverend Lord 

.Archibald Douglas, of the Queensbury family, is the 
present incumbent. 

** " %? . : 

-Thus was the state of the district slowly but very 
materially -improved. The number of the clergy 
and churches or temporary buildings where the 
faithful could assemble, was more than trebled. In , 
all this important work the Bishop was substantially^ 
aided by charitable grants from " St. Andrew s"? 









/ ; , " - - 



846 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



Society." The object of avhich was to afford sup- 
port to the poorer missions. Its funds were main^ 
tained by collections in the churches and donations 
by all who took an interest in its work. 






CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



841 










CAP. LXVIII. 

COADJUTOR APPOINTED RELIGIOUS SISTERS INTRO 
DUCEDCHAPEL AT- MURTHLY CASTLE COUNTY 

OF FIFE RIOT AT DUNFERMLINE POWER OF THE 

LAW LIBERALITY OF PRINCIPAL INHABITANTS^ 

CONDUCT OF THE BISHOP SCIENCE PATRONIZED 

PRESENT TO GREGORY XVI. SERMONS AT LAW- 
RENCEKIRK TO A PRESBYTERIAN CONGREGATION 
REMARKABLE RESULT PROGRESS AT EDIN 
BURGHCHARITABLE AND EDUCATIONAL INSTI- 
TUTIONS, INDUSTRIAL SCHOOLS, ETC. THE BISHOP 
A CLASSICAL SCHOLAR ^ECCLESIASTICAL WRITERS- 
THE QUIGRICH ITS RESTORATION TO SCOTLAND.. 

The Bishop now being advanced in years and less- 
able to bear alone the burden of so great a charge 
resolved- to apply for a coadjutor. The choice^ fell ; 
on % the Rev. James Gillis, whose appointment was- 
obtained *rom the Holy See in 1837. He w; 
consecrated as Bishop of Limyra on the 22nd July,.: 
1838. This appointment added new vigour to thqj 
administration of Bishop Carruthers., Through the 
exertions of the coadjutor a colony of religious Sisters 
was brought from the diocese of Lu9on in France, 
arid established at Edinburgh. This was the firslf 



842 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



time since the great religious revolution that any 
attempt was made to bring a religious community 

into Scotland. It was eminently successful. The 
French sisters, together with an addition to their 
" number from Scotland, at once formed two houses ; 
one, where the teaching of children of the more 
wealthy classes was undertaken, and another where 
the Sisters taught the poor and also visited and 
nursed the sick. They are still known by the name 

..which they originally adopted, that of * Uraulinea de 
Jesu" 

The pontificate of Bishop Carruthers was further 
illustrated by the erection of a beautiful private 
chapel in the park of Murthly Castle, the seat of the 
.late Sir William Drummond Stewart, the well known 
American traveller. The Catholics of the neighbour 
hood were freely admitted, to this chapel, and, thus, 

. was founded a mission which still continues, .On 

2. the accession to the estate of Murthly, of Sir William s 

brother, who was a Protestant, the chapel could not 

be any longer used for Catholic purposes. Its 

furniture and decorations were removed, partly* to^ 

_Crief, and partly to Bankfoot in the neighbourhood 

{> -% " *-* " * ~ 
where the mission still exists, wholly unconnected 

with the new baronet s mansion. 

The extensive county of Fife may be said to have 
been annexed, in a missionary sense, to the missions 









CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. . 843 

already existing, during the pontificate of Bishop 
Carruthers. Soon after this county was opened as a 
field for missionary labour, six stations were establish-, 
ed at the most suitable places at Dunfermline, the 
chief city of the Western Division- of the county ; 
Cupar, the chief town of the Eastern Division ; 
Kirkcaldy ; Lochgelly ; Newburgh and Culross. The 
two last named have been discontinued as they were 
only opened for the benefit of railway people;- 
contractors, clerks and labourers. Churches have 
"since been erected at Dunfermline, Lo chgelly, Kirk-" 
caldy, and St. Andrews. At the commencement of 
these missions much favour was shown to the priest 
on duty by the Protestant inhabitants generally: 
The more intelligent even extended their favour to 
the Irish parishioners. A riot having occurred, the 
object of which was to .expel all persons of Irish 
^origin -from Dunfermline, the clerk of the Lord- 
Lieutenancy, there not being a sufficient. police force- 

-."; " _ * . <-* . . -_" . 

in the place, caused the military to be called out. A 
troop of dragoons accordingly, fifty in number, arrived 

before night, at Inverkeithing, where the Irish people , 
^came to a stand, under the protection of the Provost^ 

of the old town. They were escorted by the military^ 
^ back to ^Dunfermline ; and as it was late when theyj; 

arrived, they were lodged for the, night in the city 

hall, the principal citizens bringing for their comfort 




8 4 4 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 






. 

mattresses, blankets, rations, ale, etc., whilst the 
magistrates assured them that for the time to come they 
would have complete protection, the outraged law, - - 
although, for once, taken by surprise being more 
powerful than any force of rioters. The Bishop on the - 
occasion gave proof of his solicitude. Having heard of 
the riot, he was seen next day in the midst of the 
agitated city, seated on a bench in front of the principal 

; hotel. A rash scribe boasted, in writing, that the incum 
bent s congregation was dispersed and that he would 
henceforth have to preach to empty benches. This * ; 
was easily denied. There was no difference in ( the 

_ attendance at Mass on the Sunday following the riot. 
This fact the priest in charge communicated to the 

t editor of a friendly paper who gladly published the 
statement. Not Only on this occasion but at other 
times as well the incumbent of that day, who was , 

the first resident priest in the county, could congrat- 1 

* - "- -.--"- j/fC- -.- 

ulate himself on " the kind attention shown by the 

., ..- ;-_/ - -., -;-.A7j 

Provost- and Magistrates of Dunfermline, the Pro 
curator fiscal and the Sheriff substitute (County v< 

-"- .- -.1 - - -<. .. V . 

/Judge) in particular. ; 

The Bishop, now having a coadjutor who shared : 
with him the burden of the Episcopate, was more at 
leisure to apply to scientific studies. Chemistry was 
still his- delight. "^He possessed all the more recent " 

. works On the subject, and he frequently experimented 






CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



845 



with marvellous success. Not only this. He extend 
ed his patronage to such as interested themselves in 
chemical pursuits. Mr. Kemp, a working chemist 
of Edinburgh, had fallen upon a great improvement 
of the electro-galvanic battery. The Bishop visited 
him, made a trial of the improved battery, and 
ordered one for the College of Blairs and another 
for the Scotch College at Rome. Mr. Kemp then 
asked the Bishop whether he might presume, when 
sending to the Scotch College, to send a battery as 
a present to the Holy Father, Gregory XVI. The 
Bishop considered that such a present would be very 
acceptable. A battery, accordingly, was sent to the 
Pope. Gregory XVI. received it most graciously, 
and caused it to be operated by a learned professor 
in his presence. He was delighted ; and in order to 
show his appreciation, sent two beautiful gold medals 
to Mr. Kemp. These medals were brought, to 
Scotland by the Rev. John Gray, afterwards Bishop 
of Glasgow, and faithfully (delivered to Mr. Kemp. V 
Meanwhile, missionary duties were not neglected 
by the Bishop or by the clergy. In this connection 
it may be told that something entirely new in the 
history of missionary action occurred about this 
,time. ; Hitherto it had been found expedient to 
conduct Catholic services and preach Catholic ser 
mons as privately as possible considering the preju 



846 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



dices that still lurked in the public mind. To attack 
: those prejudices boldly and openly was looked on as 
an impossibility. The Protestants themselves were 
the first to overthrow this idea. When the writer 
of these sketches was temporarily in charg-e of the 
Forfarshire missions, the people of Lawrencekirk (a 
village celebrated as the birthplace of the philosopher 
and poet, Beattie,) and neighbourhood requested him 
: to come to their village and deliver to them a "Cath 
olic sermon." This request was renewed, from time 
Jto time, for several months. At last the priest belie 
ving that the good people were perfectly in earnest^ 
consented to preach to them. A very numerous 
congregation from the village and surrounding coun 
try came to hear the sermon. The misrepresenta 
tions of Protestant writers and preachers were dwelt 
upon and the true doctrine of the Church set forth. 
At the conclusion of the discourse, came thanks and I 
congratulations, together with a. pressing invitation 
to return and give them another sermon. YThis invita 
tion was frequently repeated during the following two 
months. The priest taking with him quite a number of 
the books and pamphlets published by the Catholic 
Institute^ London, repaired to Lawrencekirk and 
delivered a sermon to a more numerous congregation. 
.He distributed to the audience the Catholic works 
which he had brought with him; and not without a. 









CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND^ 



847 




successful result. A minister of the Scotch Episcopal 
Church, who was a good deal in advance of his 
brethren, commenced lecturing against CathoHcs. 
The people remonstrated. His defence was that the 
priest was only deceiving them in order to gain their 1 
favour. This assertion they triumphantly repelled, 
stating that they had standard Catholic works in* 
their hands which showed the same doctrine as ttfe ; 
priest preached. The only answer to this was that 
the minister had taken an oath to oppose " Popery" 
. where ever he met with it, and let them say what they 
liked he would oppose it. It was something to have 

.-a. whole congregation of Presbyterian defenders. It Jj 

I is impossible to say what the results of all this might 
have been. The presence of the priest was required 

. by the Bishops at Edinburgh, where he was appointed | 
chaplain to. the newly-established sisterhood, the - 

; Ursulines de Jesus, and preacher at St. Mary s church. 
The solemn service of Vespers had been for some*. 

vtime established at St. Mary s church. . But as yet 
the attendance was very inconsiderable. The Bishop 
although he had given up the charge of Edinburgh 
to his coadjutor, concurred with him in his endeavour 
to increase the attendance at Vespers. He presided - 
pontifically every Sunday; and when he could not 
be present, the coadjutor took his place. He also 
gave all encouragement to the chaplain of the Ursu- 









- - 



040 CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 

Jines, who undertook and announced a course -of 
sermons on the doctrines .of the Church to be 

-delivered on Sunday afternoons at Vespers. There 
was also a very competent choir under the direction 
of Mr, Hargitt. In a few weeks the attendance was 

so much improved that the church was completely 

filled from the sanctuary rails to the door. This better 
state -of things gave so much satisfaction to the 
Bishop that the coadjutor took occasion to compli 
ment the congregation in a formal address from the 
altar. ._ 

fc 1 ; Charitable and educational institutions were fos 
tered by the Bishop and his colleague. Among 

- these was a branch of the Ursuline community estab-^ 
lished in the heart of the "old town," whose care it 
was to teach the poorer children and also to visit and 
tend the sick poor ; the Society of St. Vincent of : 
Paul in_ the guidance of which the Rev. James 

Stothert took a leading part; and the Guild of St. ": 

, \ - . . . - 

Joseph which owed its origin to Bishop Gillis. This ~ 

... 

last named institution, modeled according to tfce , 

ancient Catholic guilds, was efficient in providing 
mutual aid and exercising charity. It did good ser 
vice, moreover, on occasions of religious processions,. ." 

-by its imposing numbers and the picturesque costume 
of its members. The Bishops extended their en- 

,couragement to the Catholic schools generally ; and 



ac-JJ-.* 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



849 





greatly promoted education among the poor by their 
attention to the " united industrial schools." These 
schools were first established at Edinburgh, under 
the name of " ragged schools," by a distinguished 
Protestant preacher, the Rev. Dr. Guthrie, for the 
benefit of his poorer parishioners. Then followed 
the Catholic "ragged schools," and, finally, both came 
to be united as "The United Industrial Schools" of 
Edinburgh. St. Margaret s Society was chiefly insti 
tuted in order to aid the poorer schools of the dis 
trict. To it, also, the Bishops lent their countenance 
in concurrence with its principal founder, the late 
Mr. Monteith of Carstairs. The College of Blairs 
.-shared the solicitude of the Bishops ; and the senior 
Bishop resided there for a considerable time, his 
^example inspiring the students with a love for scien- 
; tific study. 

; : The-Bishop was, endowed with great literary taste. 
His knowledge of the ancient and modern classics 
Tvas more, than ordinary. He wrote Latin with 
elegance and spoke French with remarkable fluency/; 

although he had never visited France since the time 

- .-. 

of his studies. He was also a patron of letters as 
well as of science. He rejoiced in the literary acquire 
ments and oratorical powers of his eloquent coadjutor; 
and he often expressed his satisfaction with the con-,; 
troversial writings of the Rev. Paul McLachlan, 



850 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



D.D., of Falkirk, who was a distinguished founder 
of missions and builder of churches, no less that with 
the writings of the Rev. Stephen Keenan, D.D., of 
Dundee, and those of the Rev. John Stewart 
McCorry, D. D., of Perth. With the Rev. Mr. 
Keenan and the Rev. John McPherson, D. D., the 
Bishop concurred in promoting the establishment 
,bf an academy at Welburn, .near Dundee. 

Among the many things that tended to give lus 
tre to the pontificate of Bishop Carruthers were the 
discovery and final restoration to Scotland of that 
invaluable relic, the quigrich or crozier of St. Fillan. 
This relic is certainly the most interesting that remains 
in connection with ancient Scottish history. The late 
Mr. Adam Dawson was the first who aroused at 
tention in regard to it, and made known that it had 
found its way to Canada. When visiting in the; 
township of Beckwith he was shown the venerable^ 
quigrich together with documents which proved its 
authenticity, at the house \6f its hereditary guardian." 
Alexander Dewar or Doir. He lost no time in com- 
municating the information thus received to his 
brother the Rev. yEneas McDonell Dawson, LL. D., 
F. R. S., who was at the time resident at Dunfer- 
mline. The latter imparted this knowledge of the 
quigrich to his good friend, Sir JDaniel Wilson,. 

L. L. D., and F. R. S., who was then secretary to- 

--.. 







CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 51 

the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland, and engaged 
in preparing his learned work, "The Pre-historic 
Annals of Scotland." It was received as a valuable 
contribution to that work and occupies one of its 

.brightest pages. The quigrich is remarkable as 
having been the crozier of St. Fillan, who,, in the 
eighth century, continued the work of St. Columba 
among the Scots and Picts. It was held in, 
great veneration by King Robert Bruce, who 
had it in the tent in which he heard Mass 
and received the Holy Communion, before joining 
battle with Edward II. of England at Bannock- 
burn. Immediately after the conflict the King 
returned to his tent in order to give thanks to 
Almighty God for the great victory which he had 
won. Anxious to make sure that the relics, of St. 

.TFillan were in the reliquary at the head of the crozier, 
destined to contain them, on examination, , he found 

them not. He asked the. Abbot of Inchaffray, their 
custodian, to account for their absence, and received 
for reply that it had been thought prudent to remove 

them before the battle to a place of safety. . "What 
better place of safety," said the King, indignantly, 
to the affrighted Abbot, "than the army of your 
King ? " and, depriving him of the guardianship, con- 

,;fided it to Malise Doir, the ancestor of the Dewara 
or Doirs of Canada, who had distinguished himself 
















852 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 






by good service in the great battle. The quigrich 
continued under the guardianship of the Dewars 

I . till our day, with only a temporary interruption, 
when it came into the possession of the Catholic 
family of Glengarry. Mr. Dewar denied that it 
was parted with for money, as a common matter of 
bargain and sale ; but admitted that it had been 

given in pledge for a loan. The Dewars ceasing to 
prosper from the time that they gave up the quigrich, 
appealed to the generosity of Glengarry, who liberally 
surrendered the precious relic to its hereditary 
guardians. Prosperity, however, did not return 

. with the restoration of the sacred trust ; and the 
family emigrated to Canada. Sir Daniel Wilson 
had also come to Canada, and was for some time a 
Professor in the University of which he is now the 
, Principal. It was a cherished object with him to have 
the quigrich restored to Scotland. His first nogotia- 
tions with the Dewars proved fruitless. Some time 
later. he returned, to the charge and was more sue-, 

| -cessful. Mr. Alex. Dewar himself had become 
anxious that the great relic should go back to Scot 
land. He was eighty-seven years * of age ; and 

-rightly believed that his sons would not be guided 
l>y the same sentiments as himself in regard to Scot 
land and its historical associations. In fact, he could 
imagine the holy and historic relic among the profane 






CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 







853 



shows of a Barnum or consigned to the melting pot. 
Such a fate could only be averted by treating with 
Sir Daniel Wilson ; and he did so on the most liberal 
terms. Seven hundred dollars were the ransom for it 
required by the family. Two hundred of these 
Mr. Dewar himself agreed to pay. The rest was 
provided through Dr. Wilson, by the Society of. 
Antiquaries at Edinburgh. It now remained only 
to have the venerable relic conveyed to Scotland. 
This Sir Daniel Wilson accomplished with complete 
success. A full meeting of the Antiquaries was held, 
the Marquess of Lothian presiding, on occasion of the 
reception of the quigrich which will ever remain as^ 
sacked trust in the keeping of the venerable anti 
quaries, for the gratification, instruction and edifica 
tion of Scotch people in all time to come. The I 
most probable derivation of the name, quigrich, is 
.from ("the king s crook") the crozier haying been..; 
greatly venerated by King 1 Robert Bruce. The 
deed, signed by Alex. Dewar and his son , Archibald/;: 
is dated December, 1876, and distinctly makes over, 
fm^trust, to the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland ; 
the most interesting relic. (See "The proceedings J; 
of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland, 9/th 
session, 1876-1877, vol. 12; part i " Edinburgh^ 

.1877.) V 

- 



t 









854 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



,_ v CAP. LXIX. 

CONVERSIONS BISHOP GILLIS AND OTHER WRITERS 

THE EX-KING OF FRANCE DEATH OF MR. MENZIES 

HIS LAST WILL MAGNIFICENT FUNERAL 

BISHOP GILLIS A DIPLOMATIST HIS SUCCESS IN 

OBTAINING FUNDS FOR THE MISSION CAUSES THE 

LIBRARY OF THE SCOTCH COLLEGE AT PARIS TO BE 

REMOVED TO BLAIRS DEATH OF THE HONOURABLE 

AND RIGHT REVEREND ALEXANDER M*DONELL AT 
DUMFRIES HIS FUNERAL AT EDINBURGH IN 2O 

YEARS HIS REMAINS TRANSFERRED TO KINGSTON 



THE CHURCH AND HOUSE OF ST. MARY*S, EDIN 
BURGH, GREATLY IMPROVED GUILD OF ST. JOSEPH 

SOCIETY OF ST. VINCENT OF PAUL BISHOP GILLIS 

_AND THE "FREE CHURCH " -NEGOTIATIONS CON 
CERNING THE SCOTCH MONASTERY AT RATISBON 
FINAL DECISION FRENCH HOYAL FAMILY AT EDIN 
BURGHTHE COUNT DE CHAMBORD RELICS 

SAINT CRESCENTIA RELICS OF SAINT MARGARET^ 

jj PERTH BANQUET AT BIRTH OF THE PRINCESS 

ROYAL, 1840 GREAT PROGRESS, CONSOLING TO 

THE BISHOP IN HIS OLD AGE HIS DEATH. 

Conversions were not as yet very frequent in 
Scotland. That they were not impossible, however/ 




CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



855 






circumstances occasionally showed. Towards the 
close of Bishop Carruthers career, in the year 1850, 
Viscount Fielding came to Edinburgh in order to be 
received into the Church, together with Lady 
Fielding. They applied to the coadjutor Bishop, 
before whom they made their abjuration. This had 
scarcely been done when the Viscount s father, the 
Earl of Denbigh, accompanied by his chaplain, the 
Rev. Mr. Baylee, arrived, in the hope of being able 
to prevent his son and daughter-in-law from taking 
what he considered a false step. To his great 
mortification, however, it was too late. As if to make 
amends he and his clerical friend sought and obtained 
an interview with Bishop Gillis, at which Mr. Baylee 
raised a discussion on several tenets of the Catholic 
- Church. The conversation, or controversy ^ lasted 
x three hours ; but led to no result. Soon after, Mr. 
Baylee published a very unfair account of the inter,- 
; view in* the Morning Herald. Bishop Gillis was 
& obliged, in consequence, to insert in the same paper 
a counter statement for his own vindication. An un 
profitable newspaper correspondence was the result. 
But it was not of long continuance. It lasted, Kow-j? 
I ever, long enough to show how little justice was to 
; be expected from the public press of. the time. The 
/ unfairness of the Herald s report imposed on Bishop 
Gillis the necessity of publishing a pamphlet, in 







5 6 CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 

which he gave in detail the facts and arguments that 
had been brought forward, This work, although it 
had no effect on the opinions and prejudices of Mr. 
Baylee and his right houourable patron, was circu 
lated, along with the coadjutor s other learned writ 
ings, and won for him, apart from his episcopal charac- 
ter, a high place among men of letters. 

Another able writer of the time among Catholics 
was the Reverend James Stothert, a graduate of 
Cambridge and a convert to the Catholic faith. Of 
Mr. Stothert s ability as a writer and lecturer we- 
need no better proof than the elegant lectures which 
he delivered at Edinburgh, and which gave so much: 
delight to all who heard them. 

Mr. William Turnbull, a member of the Edin 
burgh bar, was well known in those times as a man 
of letters and a zealous antiquary. He was for some 
time secretary to the Society of Antiquaries of Scot 
land ; and was succeeded in that office, by Principal^ 
Sir Daniel Wilson, now at Toronto. Mr. Turnbull;^ 
like Mr. Stothert, was a convert .to the Catholic re- 
: ligion. Dr. Kemp, of the medical profession, was 
also a convert, and did honour to his profession bjr 
the elegance of his writings. Another convert, Sir 
William Drummond Stewart, was one of the first 

> - 7f. .+~ r ^.- > - * 

who travelled through and explored the Rocker 
Mountains of America, and was well known throng K 















CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



857 



out those wild regions as " the hospitable Scotch 
man." What he wrote about his travels entitles him 
to honourable mention among literary men. His nice 
appreciation of the fine arts was well shown in the 
tasteful decorations and whole style of the elegant 
chapel which, at a cost of ,16,000, he erected near 

. his family mansion, Murthly Castle. 

Mr. Clerk, son of Sir George Clerk, Bart, of 
Pennycuick, so long known in Canada as the editor 
of the Montreal " True Witness" and much distin 
guished by his able writings, was a convert of the 
time. James Browne, LL.D., who so well illus 
trated portions of Scottish history, and who was also 
a convert to the Catholic Faith, fills, and is well en- 
tided to fill, a high place among the literary charac 
ters of Edinburgh. The brothers, Alexander and 

^George Miller, of the British army, grandsons of 
Lord-Glenlea of the Court of Session (the Supreme.: 
Court of Scotland), and sons of Colonel Miller, who 

fell at Waterloo, are well entitled to an honourable* 

<."..-.. " *:y:; i . r - -- ( -, . 
place among the distinguished converts of the period^ 

If correct, elegant and judicious composition of 
sermons can give any claim to literary reputation it 

.eminently belonged to the Rev. Alexander Badenoch. 

* It is to be regretted that he left no writing to impart 
instruction and perpetuate his memory. The ex- 
King of France, Charles X, who attended regularly 









858 CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 

at St Mary s Church, where Mr. Badenoch was the 
senior priest, was heard to say that he showed much 
feeling in his sermons. Mr. Smith, editor of the 
Catholic Magazine of those times, and the first that 

- appeared, must not be forgotten. H is work ably pro 
moted the cause of letters as well as that of religion. 
It would be a grievous mistake not to mention the 
Venerable John Sharpe who after having laboured 
long in the mission, was President of Blairs College 
in Bishop Carruthers time. Under his rule, and 
without the aid of punishments, the highest discipline 
prevailed. 

The Reverend William Bennet was one of the 
gifted men of Bishop Carruthers time. He laboured 
many year3 in the mission, and was distinguished for 

: both piety and learning. He joined the Society of 
Oblates and was Professor of Greek and English 

Literature for several years in the University which 

f".i -"f*- . * 

that Society founded and conducts at Ottawa, Canada. 

He died there at the advanced age of 73 in 1887. 

In the time of Bishop Carruthers that illustrious 
scholar, Nicholas Cardinal Wiseman, paid several 
visits to the clergy and Catholics of Edinburgh. 
Colonel McDonell of that time who lived long at 
Edinburgh, wrote a remarkable work, called "the 
Abrahamidae," in which he endeavoured to prove 
that the people of Scotland are descended from the 









CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



859 



Patriarch, Abraham. His work and the idea it 
maintains were only known to the Colonel s private 
friends, as he never published it, 

Charles Glendonwyne Srott was a striking figure 
in the society of those days. He was called and was 
in reality, Mr. O Connell s " Head Pacificator for 
Scotland." The mission lost its best benefactor when 
John Menzies, Esq., of Pitfodels, departed this life on 
the nth of Oct., 1843. Bishop Gillis returned from an 
intended tour to Germany in time for the funeral, 
which was conducted with all the pomp becoming a 
friend of .the Church who was so deeply lamented. 
Bishops Kyle and Murdoch were present, together 
with many of the clergy from various parts of Scot 
land. The Guild brethren, in full costume, appear- 1 
ing in procession from St. Mary s Church to the 
Chapel of St. Margaret s Convent, where the inter 
ment took place, added much to the solemnity of the 
services. ; Meanwhile, some oT the populace mistook 
the .brethren for priests ; and ^certain murmurings 
were heard about so many " Romish " priests bein^ 
in the city. This may not have aniounted to much. 
Nevertheless, the police officers thought it advisable 
that the Guild men should not return in their uniform r 
and counselled them accordingly. Bishop Carruthers 
was unavoidably absent, being from home and hot; 
having had notice in time. Mr. Menzies testamen- 



- 



86o 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 









tary settlements had been partly executed in 1834, 
,To St. Margaret s Convent he bequeathed a con 
siderable sum of money, together with a small landed 
estate, for the benefit of the community established 
there. Bishop Gillis he appointed his residuary 
legatee, and willed to him, besides, the property and 
/house of Greenhill, where Mr. Menzies had spent 
the last years of his life, and, along with it, the 
plate and furniture. The library also, he left to the 
Bishop during his life, appointing that it should after- 
Awards belong to the future College of the Eastern 
District. The testator directed, moreover, that the 
debts of the two churches of Edinburgh should be 
paid out of his funds. Legacies were left to each of the 
three Vicars-Apostolic for building new churches in 
the Highland portions of the Western district, and 
for erecting a new church at Aberdeen. In addition 
there were several bequests to individuals ; so that 
almost the whole of .Mr. , Menzies property was de- 
nsed for ecclesiastical and charitable purposes in 

Scotland. 

, , . 

; Soon after the appointment and consecration of 
Dr. Gillis as coadjutor, Bishop Carruthers had good 
reason to congratulate himself on the diplomatic 
ability and success of the newly appointed Bishop in/ 
.obtaining additional funds for the use of the mission. -^ 
Hitherto the Society for the Propagation of the 









I 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



86 1 





Faith, which originated at Lyons in 1822, and had 
one of its directing councils at Paris, had confined its 
benefactions to missions outside of Europe. When 
Bishop Gillis applied for some aid to the struggling 

missions of Scotland the reply was given that the 

" 
Society could not deviate from the purpose for which 7; 

it was founded, even in favpur of the poorest European 
mission. The Bishop was not to be defeated. Avail- 1 
ing himself of his acquaintance in France, and 
finding himself sustained in his views by several 
religious and influential persons, he set about estab 
lishing: another charitable society for giving assistance 
in European missionary countries, on the same plan 
as that of the institution already in existencel In 
this endeavour he was eminently successful. The 
devout Catholics, who at first favoured his views, 
.and lent him their countenance, continuing to sustain 
him, the new institution, called Tceuvre du Catholicism. 

; -en Europe (the work of Catholicity in Europe/, was ; 

.-established *at Paris. The prospects of .this under-:- 

^taking were in a short time so good that the 
.Society became alarmed for its prosperity. Its coi 

f-cils, dreading the influence of the rival institution^ 
]aid the whole case before the Holy See. >-It wasp 
there decided that there should be only one society,* 
as the interests of two rival societies might often 
clash and injure each other. !t would tend more to 




862 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 




promote the general good, that the missions of all 
countries, whether -European or other, should- in 
future, receive aid in proportion to the necessities of 
each mission and the means at command of the 
Society for granting aid. It was, no doubt, cause of 
regret that a good work with such excellent pros 
pects, should be abandoned. Meanwhile, it had pro 
duced its fruit. The council of the original, or rather, 
the united society entertained favourably the case of 
the Scotch missions, and ever since they have shared 
abundantly in its distributions. 

The influence of the coadjutor was still further 
employed in obtaining that all that remained of the 
library of the Scotch College of Paris, should be 
transferred to Blairs. In May, 1839, he returned to- 
Scotland. 

A singularly distinguished son of Scotland, where 
were spent the earlier years of his ecclesiastical 
career, justly claims honourable mention here.JJrgedv 
by his sacerdotal zeal the Honourable and Right Rev, 

Alexander McDonell, of Kingston, had traversed the -I 

- - - . - 

Atlan tier Ocean and revisited the scenes of his earlier ;J 
labours in order to obtain some assistance for his 
recently established diocese in Canada, It was not * 
however, the will of the Great Master that he should 
^continue his work in the vineyard ; and he was called 1 
suddenly to his reward a day or two after his arrival 



- 














CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



863 



at Dumfries, in Scotland, on the 1 4th day of January; 
1840. (For details see Biography by Chevalier W. ; 
J. McDonell, of Toronto, Canada.) It was resolved, 
on the occasion, to do the greatest possible honour, 
as was fitting in the case of a prelate who had been 
so eminent in his day as a Bishop, and, in trying 
times, had done signal service to both Church and 
State. The remains were conveyed to Edinburgh^ 
in order to be temporarily deposited in the vaults of; 
the chapel of St. Margaret s Convent. The funeral 
services were conducted with extraordinary pomp at 
St. Mary s Church. Nothing of the kind so splendid 
had been seen at Edinburgh since Royalty ceased to 
have its abode in the Scottish capital. A magnifi 
cent funeral car was provided, a procession formed,, 
and all that was mortal of the great Bishop conveyed ; 
to the Convent, there to await transference to the 
_seat of his Canadian diocese. Twenty years later, 

one of his successors, Bishop Horan, effected the 

r 

change and laid down in their final resting place the 

^remains of Kingston s first Bishop. ~. 

f 

When Bishop Carruthers gave over the charge of 

I Edinburgh and its two churches to his coadjutor, the 
latter made several improvements in St. Mary s 

-Church. The pews were in great part renewed. A 
new altar with appropriate furniture, and a new pulpitl 
were erected. A screen of elaborately carved oak 




864 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 




was placed at great cost around the sanctuary, and 
within it an episcopal throne and a^ choir organ. 
The chief organ, meanwhile,, was repaired and en 
larged, and the church newly painted ; and decorated 
within. The house in which resided the Bishop and 
clergy was also considerably improved. The walls 
were raised a few feet and new furniture provided. 

It was at this time also that Dr. Gillis, with the 
consent of the Bishop, instituted the Holy Guild of; 
St. Joseph. li was his good fortune also to favour 
the establishing in Edinburgh of the well known 
Society of St. Vincent of Paul. This brotherhood 
that followed so closely in the footsteps of its sainted 
patron, although it originated in Paris so Iatearr833, 
in a short time had branches all over France, and , 
somewhat later, in every country where there are 
Catholics. At Edinburgh there are three confer 
ences. . 

At this time (1846), Mr. Frederick . Monod, a 
Calvinist* minister, directed, under the auspices of. 
the Free Church of Scotland, a volume of calumnies 
,d misrepresentations against the Catholic Church. 
The Bishop considered it his duty to reply. He,, 
accordingly, prepared an elaborate refutation of Mr. 
Monod s book and addressed it to the assembly of the 
Free Church, which was then in session. No 
answer was received,, and it is not known what im- 
























CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



86 5 






pression the Bishop s work produced on the Free 
Church mind ; but the volume remains a monument 
of its author s learning, moderation and literary skill. 

Bishop Carruthers, at his advanced age, could ill I 
dispense, even temporarily, with the presence at 
Edinburgh and aid of his coadjutor. It was, never 
theless, resolved that the latter should proceed to 
Ratisbon in Bavaria, as representative of the Vicars- 
Apostolic of Scotland, in order to obtain if possible, v 
that on the decease of the last Scotch Benedictine, 
Prior Deassori (Dawson,) the Monastery of St. James 
should be secularized and converted into a Seminary 
for the Scotch missions. Such a demand was not 
unreasonable, as all the properties connected with 
the Monastery, had been gifted to it by Scotchmen, 
noblemen and others interested in the cause of Scotch jj 
education. The Bishop had taken care to provide 
himself with letters of introduction from the ex-Royal ; 
Family of France. He succeeded, moreover, in 
interesting in favour of his view the Bishop of 
Ratisbon and the surviving Religious. He then 
repaired to Munich and obtained an audience of the 
King, who received him with favour, entertained his 
application, and referred him for a final answer to 
his Minister for Ecclesiastical Affairs. It appears to 
have been no easy matter for this Minister, to manu-J 
facture a reply. For it was not given till after a 






v 



866 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 









delay of four months, when everything asked for 
was refused, and a threat held out, at the same time, 
that if the Monastery were not supplied with subjects, 
Scotch Benedictines, within six months, it would be 
delivered to Bavarian members of the same Order. 
The Bishop replied to this extraordinary State paper, 
which "was wholly founded on erroneous assumptions, 
in a memorial which was called " Reclamations," and 
- which set forth the claims and rights of the Scotch 
mission to the whole property, proving beyond ques 
tion, that it was the intention of the founders and 
benefactors to promote the cause of the Catholic Re 
ligion in Scotland, and not to benefit the Bavarians. 
He pointed out, moreover, how unjust it would be to 
- alienate the Seminary, from the Scotch mission, de 
claring it to be nothing less than an act of spoliation. 
The Bavarian Ministry were proof against argument 

* * - "* " JL 1 *-" *-l-" ."-*"*, . * - " -^*" 

.Meanwhile, Bishpp Gfllis submitted the memorial 
Lord Palmerston, at the time ^Foreign Secretary, am 
requested him to use his influence with the Court of 
, Bavaria* in order to obtain more reasonable tertrisJ 
The British Minister promised to give his aid and 

. 

suggested that the memorial should be presented tpfl 
him in a more condensed form. This was done; 
and the Government, " through their envoy at |j 
at Munich, Mr. Milbank. made .a representation to 
e Bavarian Ministry. This action was flo{ without 






CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



867 



its effect. The threatened measure was suspended, 
and the matter in question was referred for final 
decision to the Holy See. There even, the nig 
gardly spirit of the Bavarian Ministry so far pre 
vailed that only .10,000 was allowed to Scotland / 
in lieu of all the properties bestowed by Scotchmen 
on the Monastery of St. James of Ratisbon. It was 
a condition of this decision that the sum mentioned 1 
should be applied in aid of additions to the Scotch ." 
College at Rome. The negotiations lasted eight, 
months, the two or three last of which the Bishop 
spent at Bruges. In March, 1849, he returned to 
Edinburgh. 

- " r - . 

The pontificate of Bishop Carruthers was further 
illustrated by the sojourn for some years, at Edin 
burgh of -the ex-King. Charles X., and the exiled 

v Royal Family of France.- All kind and proper 
attentions^Jwere shown them by the Bishop, his - : 
coadjutor, the Rev/Alexander Badenoch, and the 
other priests, of the time. A special pew was fitted 
up for them in St. Mary s Church, where they regu-, 
larly attended, and a private passage opened from 

;V the^ Bishop s house to the church. 

The grandson and heir of the exiled King Henri , 
Due De Bordeaux, better known, afterwards, as 

* 

Count De Chambord, had his earlier education at 
Edinburgh. Later in life, when a yoking man, he 



868 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



revisited the scenes of his youth in Scotland. He 
was treated everywhere with attention and every 
mark of regard. He paid a visit to St. Margaret s 
Convent, and held a levee there attended by His 
Grace, Mgr. le Due De L6vis, Admiral Count Villaret 
Joyeuse and his preceptor, M. De Barande. Several 
persons of distinction friends of his family availed 

themselves of the opportunity to honour him with 

. / 

: their friendly greetings. The chaplain, who as such, 
and also as senior priest of Edinburgh, assisted the 
good sisters in doing the honours of the house, in 
the absence of the Bishop, requested Mgr. De L6vis 
to.present to the Prince, the venerable Sister Agnes 
>Xavier, informing him that she was the daughter of 
a . Presbyterian clergyman, and a convert to the 
Catholic Faith, the first Scotch lady who, since 
the Religious Revolution, became a Religious, and one 
of the first colony of Religious Sisters who occupied;; 
St Margaret s Convent To hear all this was a: new 
pleasure to the Prince, who was a good Catholic. I 

.In 1842, a new honour was added to the pontificate 
of Bishop Carruthers by the arrival in Scotland of 
the relics of one of the early martyrs. This good 
fortune was due to the zeal of a Catholic lady, Mrs. 
Colonel Hutchison, who, on occasion of a visit to 
Rome, had an audience of the -- Holy Father, 
Gregory XVI., at which she was introduced as ,a 

. . . . * .*>,i; /*.*; -."io .:. ; 







CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



869. 






convert from Protestantism, and a liberal bene 
factress of the Scotch missions. The Pope was so 
pleased that he asked her to name any favour it might 
be in his power to grant. The good lady expressed 
her wish to obtain the relics of a saint for her "eldest 
daughter." On learning that this was no other 
than Saint Margaret s Convent, Gregory XVI. 
immediately ordered that the body of Saint 
Crescentia, Virgin and Martyr, should be confided 
to Mrs. Hutchison. On her return home, in 

* 

company with Bishop Ullathorne, she was arrested 
at Leghorn, having been mistaken for a person of 
the same name who had aided in the escape of 
Lavalette in 1816. Bishop Ullathorne on reaching 
London, drew up a statement of the case, which was 
presented to Lord Aberdeen by Lord Cunningham, 
(a Judge of the Supreme Court) Mrs. Hutchison s 
brother^ The British Minister lost no time in 
communicating with /, Prince Metternich> . and an 
apology speedily put an end to the trouble! A list 

^P 

of " contraband " individuals was no longer kept on 
the frontier of Lombardy where many British 
travellers had been stopped and turned back. In 
future there could be no such annoyance. The case 
of relics which Mrs, Hutchison carried with her 
was an additional source of anxiety to her during her 
misadventure. She succeeded, however, in bringing 1 



I& , ,._^ 



8;o 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 




it safely to Edinburgh ; and the relics of Saint 
Crescentia, having been duly presented to the Ursu- 
line:Sisterhood, were deposited in an elegant shrine, 
designed by the celebrated architect, Pugin, and 
manufactured by Bonnar and Carfrae, of Edinburgh. 
Somewhat later, Scotland and the Convent were 
enriched with a relic of Oneen Saint Margaret, 7 
obtained from Spain through the exertions of Bishop 
Gfllis, when Vicar- Apostolic. But we must not anti 
cipate. , 

V ; One of the latest acts of the Bishop, now far ad 
vanced in years, was to preside at the re-opening of 
the enlarged and improved Church of St. John, at 
Perth. . He asked on that occasion the writer, who 
had preached in the forenoon, to give a second 
sermon^at the Vesper service. - On the latter sugges- 
ting that it would be more acceptable to the congre 
gation to hear a few words from their Bishop, the aged 
prelate addressee! to them a short but very feeling allo- : 

:ution. In connection with Perth it may be men- 

j 

tioned, : as shewing the advancing .liberality ^ of the 
; time, that on occasion of a banquet given by the muni 
cipality, 1840, in honour of the birth of the Princess- 
MRbyal, now Empress Dowager of Germany, the Lord 
Provost invited the priest in charge at the time, and 
[included him in the toast of ihe clergy t to the = 
great satisfaction of the numerous co mpariyr 












.. - " 











- It was a source of great consolation to the vener- ; 
able Bishop, in his declining years, to observe the 
progress which, religion had made during his compara- 
- lively short pontificate. The number of churches 
and clergy, had increased and was still increasing^ 
jthe cause of Catholic education was daily gaining 
Aground ; Catholics from being a disliked and dreaded 
sect, were become popular ; religious societies had*! 
begun to be introduced ; the community of St. 

"" 

Margaret s, with its two houses, had gained by its 
successful pains in the work of education and its 
charitable care of the sick, the affection of the Cath- ; 
olics and the esteem of the general public. The 

. Bishop was now eighty-three years of age, and J 
having lived to witness all that he could expect or 
hope for, he was prepared to say, like the saintly 
Simeon, "Now, Lord, dismiss Thy servant in peace* 

for my eyes have, seen the advance of Thy salvatic 
He was still active, however, and persevered 
visiting the missions ; insomuch, that it was remarked 

: that he thought he -could never do enough of duty. 
His last visit was to Dunfermline, the chief seat of 
the Fifeshire missions, which he had caused to be^ 
founded. He was there the guest of the writer forj 
the better part of a day ; and after an early dinner^ 
returned to Edinburgh/apparently in his usual good: 
health, He had scarcely reache4 the capital, however, ^ 




1 872 



CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 



when he was attacked with typhus fever, which, in 
its fatal course of eleven days, put an end to his 
career, but not until after he had participated in all 
the consolations of religion and set a bright example 
of Christian fortitude and patience. His death was 
generally lamented and spoken of in the public prints 
as that of the " the much beloved prelate." 



THE END. 



f 



: 












ADDENDA; 



TULLOCH-ALLUM. 

Tulloch-Allum in the Highlands of Banffshire, alluded to in . , 
r this work, was a favourite resort of the venerable Bishop Hay.~.The*j 
head of the family that had been resident there for several genera^ 
.tions -was devoted to the Bishop always served his mass and 
accompanied him on his missionary journeyings. . His eldest soni|| 
John Gordon, who was studying for the priesthood at the College",, 
of Douai at the time of the French Revolution, escaped from 
France, along with other students, and became distinguished as a 

missionary Priest. He built a church at Dumbarton and another -: 

.. . - " 

at Greenock, where, afterwards, the late Reverend William Gordon, 

the last chief of the clan Gordon of Glenbucket, was so long the | 
.zealous .and popular pastor. 
.The following account of the" missions of Cabrach, Achen- r - 

- doune, and AbulineSpeyside, from 17 70 till 1856, has been kin 
furnished by a worthy member of the family so long . resident 
Tullochallum. The prie st or missionary for the time* had 

.home mostly at Shenval, parish of Cabrach, one of the wild 
, spots in that poor country. A very humble thatched cottage ser\ 

- as a church long ago levelled to the ground. 

- The Catholics in Cabrach were few : and poor, but, like. some of r - 

v. the other missions, were protected by the powerful Duke of Gordon.. 

At Achendoune in those days they had no church. Mass was 

said there at intervals at the farm of Tullochallum^ then . occupied 

:^by*John Gordon, a cadet and near relative of Gordon of Clastirum. 

-.: -, in the Enzie, already mentioned in these sketches, and still in the 

. possession of his grandson, George Gordon. No room in the. 




modest, house of Tullochallum was large enough for the few : 
CatholicSj so that mass was celebrated in the ;"kiln." "A complete 
_set of hangings to cover the temporary altar were kept at TuHoch : 5; 
allum ; and one of the sons, principally the late Alexander Gordon,"" 
had the honour of carrying the altar stone and chalice, with other 
requisites for mass, from Shenval to Tullochallum and thence-: 
to Abuline, his duties further consisting : of serving mass;- ; 
the priest as a rule visiting" each place in succession 
:..-, There were few Catholics in Abuline, but the family, a cadet j 
; branch of the Letterfourie Gordons, were firmly attached to the 
old faith." < 

In addition to this, Bishop Hay, when on his journeys between 
Aberdeen and Scalan, invariably spent some time at Tullochallum, 
ssting occasionally a few weeks, his episcopal Palace for; the? 
ic being what in the language of those days was termed "the 
lest chamber," a room or rooms apart from the main house, 
[ere in quiet and solitude he used to write part of those works so 
long famous in Scotland, and forming to this day what his worthy 
uccessor, the-late Rev. Bishop Kyle, justly styled "The Layman s. . 

icology." :When on his journeys, always performed in his later 
fears on horseback, the bishop was accompanied by a man servant^ 
This was,, necessary as .well for assistance aS protection, as they 
/carried, all the baggage, including the -bishop s ; vestments; 
everything necessary for celebrating mass, in two immense sadc 

;; : The bishop, his man, and horses, were welcome at Tullochalli 
: so long as they chose to remain. It was mainly to the 
riband generosity of John Gordon, ably supported by"his pious spous 
:y" a : near relative of Gordon of Glenbucket, that , the mission .of 
\ -Achendoune owed its life and existence. 

Both from the fact that iY was frequently the temporary home 
Bishop Hay r as well as the resting place of every priest trayenin|j 
it way, the name of Tullochallum was so well" known at 
it some of the students on their return to Scotland as priest 
laving Heard so much of it and the family,- were astonisfied to 
was only a modestHfarm house. 





The late John Gordon was often heard to remark (he was 
himseif a very early riser, never in bed after four o clock) that 
on going ta visit the bishop -the first thing he did every, morn 
ing he never found His Lordship in bed or asleep", but on 
.knees at prayer. 

When times became less intolerant, and.it was considered mo 
convenient for priest and people,- the headquarters of the miss 
were removed from Shenval to the farm of Upper Kjeithock 
Achendoune, possibly about 1790. , To help the priest. to 1 
the Duke of Gordon rented him the small farm ; and a little church 
was built, one story and thatched roof. .The priest then was 
Mr. Davidson, a native of the Enzie. John Gordon of Tullochallun 
took upon himself the cost of cultivating the priest s farm, s 
and labor never doing a thing for his own till the priest s crop 
laid down. 

Rev. Mr. Davidson was removed from there to Green 
and was succeeded- early in this century by the Rev. .George C 
don, a native of Garioch, Aberdeen-shire, in many ways a rerhar 
able man. Educated at the Scotch College in Valladolid he was 
thorough Spaniard to the end of his life ; a born musician, as h 
masses and hymns testify^; composed and arranged for the use c 
small choirs as their title sets~forth, they are td~ this day the standard 
inusic in many missions i in Scotland, as much as Bishop Hay s f; 
works were the theology of the, people. 

MrfGordon, not satisfied .with the thatched chapel, . set to work 
and erected .a comfortable two story stone building with slate 
roof. . The lower story , served as- the presbytery, and the;uppe 
flat, having a vaulted roof, made a very respectable chapel a grea 
improvement on the other with the mud floor. 

/In 1817 the village of Dufftown on the property of the Earl of. j 
Fife, a very liberal nobleman, was begun. It is situated 
two and a half miles north west of the farm of Upper .Keith 
and. besides being more central was on the .high way to.Glenliya 
and the upper missions. " Mr. Gordon got a grant of a few acr 
of land from the Earl of Fife, and in 1825 he built thereon a" v< 
heat "stone church with gothic facade, in dressed sandstone, 
well as a compact and comfortable presbytery, also in stone, an 




enclosed the whole property with a stone and lime wall, all of 
which remain to this day a standing memorial of his zeal and 
energy, y vj: ^ ^^.^H- : .--~ 

With his taste and his musical talent he got. an organ for the 
new church, and trained several members of his choir, male and 

female, to play and sing. Some years before his death in 1856 
he, but of his private means, purchased a magnificent organ, cost 
ing about one thousand pounds sterling, and presented it to the 

..mission, the smaller organ going to another place. 

This good and pious priest lies buried at the side of the altar 

-in the church his. zeal was the means of erecting, and a marble 
tablet in the hall records a fitting tribute to his memory. .. How 

;> little many, now . alive, and in this over-busy century, think how 
much they are indebted to the zeal, piety and self-denial of their 
ancestors who in sad days of trial kept for them the inestimable ^ 

^ift of the Catholic faith! 







PEOGEESS. 



r .In order to convey an idea of the growth of the church since 
the restoration of the hierarchy, -it may be mentioned that in - 
the Archdiocese of Glasgow alone, the number of Catholics has 
increased to 220,000. 

The work of education keeps pace with the increase of pop 
ulation. -The teaching staff of the Archdiocese" numbers 679. 
r There has been an extraordinary extension of mission schools from 
1877 to 1888. Accommodation augmented from i 23,911 to 34,61 2: 
-number on rolls from 21,647 to 33,283 ; average attendance Vrorl 
14,521 to 24,292 ; number presented at Government examinatior 
from 10,655 to 23,117 ; at religious examination from 16,599 to 
.. 26 j477 ; while at the other schools the accommodation has risen 
from 1739 to 2082 ; number on rolls from, 1508 to 1679; tht 
number presented at religious examination from 1220 to 1553. ; 
. A second synod of the Archdiocese of. Glasgow was herd" i: 
- October last, the Archbishopjiresiding and 120 priests attending 
r ;The decrees of the first National Council which/had been held , 
i Fort Augustus were promulgated and the appointment announce 
of " Missionary Rectors " for thirteen missions. 



DeMAISTRE S 



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ive a still greater number of admirers. In his treatise on the Pope, M. de 
laistre. develops only one truth. In order to place this one truth in its fullest ; y 
flight, he employs all the resources of his talent, he lavishes all the treasures of ; 
learning. In the work before us the field is more extensive, or, to speakjl 
fmore truly, without limits. He considers man hi all his relations with God. 
He undertakes, to reconcile free will with Divine power. ^ He aims atunfolc 
the great enigma of good and" evil. He takes possession of innumerable trul ^ 
^or rather of all great and useful truths, as having a right to thenv in order* 
defend them, as their legitimate possessor, .against pride and impiety by wt 
they have been all attacked. Never did the abject, philosophy . 
entury meet with a more formidable adversary. He is" not awed, by sclenc 
genius or celebrated names. He advances without" interruption," demol 
; as he proceeds all these colossal statues with feet of clay. -Never did i 
irch with more sagacity the tortuous folds of sophistry, drag it to the 
id exhibit it, such as it is, absurd or ridiculous. Never was more, 
id more varied erudition employed with more art and judgment in order 
irrobbrate argument with all the power of evidence. 



extensive 







.By the author of "The Catholics of Scotland." 

PIUS IX; AND HIS TIM 

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THE 



""CATHOLICS OF SCOTLAND. 

By the REV*&. McD. DAWSON, LL.D., Etc. 




Thomas Coffey, Catholic Record Office, London, Orit 
Thomas Baker, I Soho Square, London, England. 



BX 1498 .039 1890 

pt.4 SMC 

Dawson, Aeneas McDone 1 

1810-1894. 
The Catho lies of 

Scotland from 1593 : 
AKE-2452 (awsk) 






V%V 

\"* v ^y